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  1. #1
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    Judges' quest - A place to document his historic feat

    Put notes, stats and general info as it relates to Judges' quest for HR record.

    Only five players had hit 60 home runs in a single season in the history of the major leagues -- that is, until Judge joined that exclusive club with a solo homer against the Pittsburgh Pirates on Tuesday night.

    There have now been nine 60-home run seasons in MLB history, achieved by six players. Judge joined Ruth, Maris, Barry Bonds (2001), Mark McGwire (1998, 1999) and Sammy Sosa (1998, 1999, 2001).

    Judge's 59 home runs were already the most by a right-handed batter in AL history. Judge had also already joined Ruth (four) and Mickey Mantle (two) as only the third member of the storied Yankees franchise to have multiple 50-homer seasons while wearing pinstripes.

    Judge also took over the Triple Crown lead Tuesday night, with his .316 batting average moving atop the AL as Minnesota Twins first baseman Luis Arraez's dropped to .314. Judge, who is all but a lock to lead the league in homers and RBIs (128), has a chance to become the 11th player to win the Triple Crown since RBIs became an official statistic in 1920.
    https://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/...-season-record
    Last edited by drt1010; 09-21-2022 at 03:49 PM.


    Sell the Team, HAL!

  2. #2
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    Most HR in a season, Yankees history:

    1961 Roger Maris: 61
    2022 Aaron Judge: 60
    1927 Babe Ruth: 60
    1921 Babe Ruth: 59

    Judge is on pace for 66 home runs. That would be one homer every 2.5 team games over the Yankees' final 15. Here's how that pacing compares to Maris and Ruth in their 61 and 60-homer seasons, respectively.

    In 1961, Maris hit 56 home runs in the Yankees' first 147 games, the '22 club's current total. That was a rate of one every 2.6 team games. He hit five homers the rest of the way in the team's final 16 games, as they played 163 with an early-season tie. That's a rate of one every 3.2 team games.


    Sell the Team, HAL!

  3. #3
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    Most HR in a season, MLB history:

    2001 Barry Bonds: 73
    1998 Mark McGwire: 70
    1998 Sammy Sosa: 66
    1999 Mark McGwire: 65
    2001 Sammy Sosa: 64
    1999 Sammy Sosa: 63
    1961 Roger Maris: 61
    2022 Aaron Judge: 60
    1927 Babe Ruth: 60

    Most HR in a season, MLB history -- with totals through 147 team games:

    2001 Barry Bonds: 73 -- 64
    1998 Mark McGwire: 70 -- 62
    2022 Aaron Judge: 66 (current pace) -- 60
    1998 Sammy Sosa: 66 -- 58
    1999 Mark McGwire: 65 -- 56
    2001 Sammy Sosa: 64 -- 55
    1999 Sammy Sosa: 63 -- 59
    1961 Roger Maris: 61 -- 56
    1927 Babe Ruth: 60 -- 54

    QUITE A LEAD

    Judge currently has a 20-homer lead over Kyle Schwarber for the MLB lead.

    That would be the fifth-largest difference between Nos. 1 and 2 in home runs for a season, behind only:

    1921 Babe Ruth: +35
    1920 Babe Ruth: +35
    1926 Babe Ruth: +26
    1928 Babe Ruth: +23


    Sell the Team, HAL!

  4. #4
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    He's on a different planet.. My baseball watching really started in the mid 90's and the last guy I've seen that was so much better than everyone else was Griffey.. Griffey was the last guy to do it clean also

  5. #5
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    Average fastball velocity is almost 94 MPH this season vs 89 MPH in 2002 and avg slider velocity is 89 MPH now, slightly higher than fastball velocity back then and much higher than the 80 MPH slider velocity at the time. Plus the percentage of sliders thrown is probably double what it was back then. In addition, pitchers are only pitching three times through the order around 13 % of the time vs 30 % of the time and batters get a higher percentage of hits in those at bats, then earlier at bats. Lastly, Judge has faced more pitchers this season than any other hitter with 60 HRs in history. while the other hitters faced between 100 and 200 different pitchers during their season, Judge has already faced 244 different pitchers. Therefore, Judge has faced by far the most difficult pitching in the history of the game.
    Last edited by johnnyi; 09-22-2022 at 07:56 AM.

  6. #6
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    I just read that Judge also has the most consistent launch angle and the highest average exit velocity and barrel rate in baseball history.

  7. #7
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    Very likely Judge finishes with double digit WAR. (10) There have only been 55 position players seasons in history that notched double-digit WAR, and not all of those were driven primarily by hitting, but rather fielding (Cal Ripken Jr.), a healthy dose of transcendent baserunning (Rickey Henderson), or an incredibly weak league (Fred Dunlap). The vast majority of years like this are put up by Hall of Famers, so Judge is in rarefied air. There’s no question that he is having a special season.
    https://blogs.fangraphs.com/will-aar...-million-deal/


    Sell the Team, HAL!

  8. #8
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    There should be a separate record for nonsteroid users

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phoba Rama View Post
    There should be a separate record for nonsteroid users
    I have always felt that roids don't help hit the ball but, a ball that may have traveled 340 get without roids, could go 350-360 or even more.
    My rough guess is that would take away 10-15 percent of their HRs
    Why not take 10-15 percent of the HRs away? 15 % Bonds would then have 11 less HR putting him at 61
    10% he would be sitting at 65. Split the difference and call it 63 is the true record.



    Ignorance is bliss

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyi View Post
    Average fastball velocity is almost 94 MPH this season vs 89 MPH in 2002 and avg slider velocity is 89 MPH now, slightly higher than fastball velocity back then and much higher than the 80 MPH slider velocity at the time. Plus the percentage of sliders thrown is probably double what it was back then. In addition, pitchers are only pitching three times through the order around 13 % of the time vs 30 % of the time and batters get a higher percentage of hits in those at bats, then earlier at bats. Lastly, Judge has faced more pitchers this season than any other hitter with 60 HRs in history. while the other hitters faced between 100 and 200 different pitchers during their season, Judge has already faced 244 different pitchers. Therefore, Judge has faced by far the most difficult pitching in the history of the game.
    And, holy ****. It's dead ball year
    So not only is he facing better pitching, he's hitting a ball that carries less.
    Bonds and Mcguire were in "live ball eras and juiced through the roof



    Ignorance is bliss

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyi View Post
    Average fastball velocity is almost 94 MPH this season vs 89 MPH in 2002 and avg slider velocity is 89 MPH now, slightly higher than fastball velocity back then and much higher than the 80 MPH slider velocity at the time. Plus the percentage of sliders thrown is probably double what it was back then. In addition, pitchers are only pitching three times through the order around 13 % of the time vs 30 % of the time and batters get a higher percentage of hits in those at bats, then earlier at bats. Lastly, Judge has faced more pitchers this season than any other hitter with 60 HRs in history. while the other hitters faced between 100 and 200 different pitchers during their season, Judge has already faced 244 different pitchers. Therefore, Judge has faced by far the most difficult pitching in the history of the game.
    Adding to the bolded part, Maris faced 101 pitchers over the course of the entire 1961 season, but he did homer off of 46 of them, while Judge has homered off of 54 different pitchers.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinkotheclown View Post
    I have always felt that roids don't help hit the ball but, a ball that may have traveled 340 get without roids, could go 350-360 or even more.
    My rough guess is that would take away 10-15 percent of their HRs
    Why not take 10-15 percent of the HRs away? 15 % Bonds would then have 11 less HR putting him at 61
    10% he would be sitting at 65. Split the difference and call it 63 is the true record.
    The increase in distance is a lot worse IMO. Prior to allegedly taking Steroid, I remember reading that Bonds hit only 3 HRs more than 400 ft, but subsequently hit a ton of them > 420 ft. All those 370 ft - 390 ft doubles and deep flyouts become HRs and all those 340 ft flyouts become doubles off the wall, etc.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by colinskik View Post
    Adding to the bolded part, Maris faced 101 pitchers over the course of the entire 1961 season, but he did homer off of 46 of them, while Judge has homered off of 54 different pitchers.
    Yes, Maris was much more familiar with the pitchers and hit a lot of HRs late in the season against them, not to mention that some of them could have been tired after a long season pitching every 4th day. Ruth also. I think he hit 19 Hrs in September.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyi View Post
    Yes, Maris was much more familiar with the pitchers and hit a lot of HRs late in the season against them, not to mention that some of them could have been tired after a long season pitching every 4th day. Ruth also. I think he hit 19 Hrs in September.
    True, But also consider Ruth's home run totals are hurt by several salient factors:

    1) Starting his baseball career as a pitcher. Therefore he only played once every four days.
    2) Playing part of his career during the dead ball era.
    3) Playing 154 games per season instead of 162.

    How dominant was Ruth at the time? In 1920, Babe Ruth hit 54 home runs…but the American League average PER TEAM was just 46 home runs. (And it was just 33 in the National League).


    Sell the Team, HAL!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by drt1010 View Post
    True, But also consider Ruth's home run totals are hurt by several salient factors:

    1) Starting his baseball career as a pitcher. Therefore he only played once every four days.
    2) Playing part of his career during the dead ball era.
    3) Playing 154 games per season instead of 162.

    How dominant was Ruth at the time? In 1920, Babe Ruth hit 54 home runs…but the American League average PER TEAM was just 46 home runs. (And it was just 33 in the National League).
    I think your comparisons to Ruth are fair. Ruth had a disadvantage in many ways. He also had many advantages. Pitcher velocities lower, movement lower, he was one of the only players swinging for the fences in his era, so pitchers were not accustomed to getting a player like that out. Pitchers didn't have comprehensive data on how to get specific players out at that time either. It's very fair to look at both sides though. I think overall there's no significant advantage for either Judge or Ruth to say that one deserves the record over the other.

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