Like us on Facebook


Follow us on Twitter





Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 63
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    9,342

    Monkey Pox -- and no, it isn't a joke.

    There are confirmed cases of Monkey Pox here in the US. Here are the CDC says to watch for.
    https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/symptoms.html
    Edit:
    With an up to 10% mortality rate, this is a potentially very serious threat.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    64,331
    Quote Originally Posted by catman View Post
    With an up to 10% mortality rate
    *in Africa

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    38,831


    Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    America
    Posts
    105,801
    Quote Originally Posted by spliff(TONE) View Post
    *in Africa
    I feel like people were saying this about COVID and China.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    8,333
    Quote Originally Posted by spliff(TONE) View Post
    *in Africa
    Even if it's lower in developed countries, remember Covid had a survival rate of like 99% and over 1 million people have died of Covid in this country.
    You don't need to have a high lethality rate to rack up a high body count.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Flock of Sheep No.97 near BAAA BAA lane
    Posts
    18,250
    You really don't know about the other aliments that people thought only occur in tropical area that is appearing here.
    There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

    Will Rogers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    46,306
    Well thankfully we live in a country that takes public health seriously and doesn't demonize doctors trying to guide the country through a global pandemic. Imagine the mess we'd be in if that wasn't how we handled things.


    "It is a grotesque parody of the bazaar at Marrakech, as if dumb animals had been granted only the amount of sentience required to mock humanity."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    46,306
    An article with some good information on it, including the R0, which is what I was looking for when I found it.

    Studies have suggested the virus’s R0 — the number of people who will hypothetically contract a communicable disease from a person infected with that disease — is relatively low, somewhere between one and two.
    https://www.vox.com/science-and-heal...break-smallpox


    "It is a grotesque parody of the bazaar at Marrakech, as if dumb animals had been granted only the amount of sentience required to mock humanity."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    47,353
    Quote Originally Posted by natepro View Post
    An article with some good information on it, including the R0, which is what I was looking for when I found it.



    https://www.vox.com/science-and-heal...break-smallpox
    This is what ultimately matters. We've seen cases of Ebola in this country in the last decade as well. Yeah it sucks that anyone catches it but it really comes to down to how contagious it is. Not to mention, there is a vaccine for it and the US is apparently being proactive in a potential response if it does get worse.

    https://nypost.com/2022/05/19/us-buy...chusetts-case/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    64,331
    Quote Originally Posted by natepro View Post
    Well thankfully we live in a country that takes public health seriously and doesn't demonize doctors trying to guide the country through a global pandemic. Imagine the mess we'd be in if that wasn't how we handled things.
    Excellent point.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    9,342
    Here is why I take this seriously.
    "EMS Response to the Current Outbreak of Monkeypox
    Monkeypox is a rare, pox-like viral disease found mainly in Central and Western Africa. In the past several years, cases of Monkeypox have been detected outside of Africa, typically linked to international travel or imported animals. On May 18, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) confirmed a single case of monkeypox virus infection in an adult male with recent travel to Canada. The CDC has been tracking the U.S. case as well as multiple clusters of Monkeypox reported in several countries that typically do not see Monkeypox cases including Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Italy, and the United Kingdom (CDC). 
    EMS Strategies for Preventing the Spread of Monkeypox
    • Given the actions of the public health authorities, it is very unlikely that EMS clinicians will encounter a person infected with Monkeypox during routine operations. However, EMS professionals should follow an identify, isolate, and inform strategy, as outlined in NETEC’s webinar The I’s Have It: Identity, Isolate, and Inform to stop the spread of illness.
    • Find additional resources on clinical care and infection control related to Monkeypox.
    • If you suspect a case of Monkeypox, contact your state health department for possible initiation of special pathogen transport protocols. State of Iowa Duty Officer 24/7 reporting 1-800-362-2736 or the CDC Emergency Operations Center 1-770-488-7100.
    Identifying the Signs, Symptoms, and Risk Factors for Monkeypox
    • The signs and symptoms of Monkeypox include flu-like symptoms (fever, headache, muscle aches) and swollen lymph nodes. Learn more about the signs and symptoms of Monkeypox.
    • One to three days after the onset of viral symptoms, the patient will develop a rash that becomes vesicular/pustular starting on the face and covering the whole body.
    • An individual who has recently traveled to a country where Monkeypox is endemic, including Central and Western African countries such as Nigeria or the Democratic Republic of Congo, parts of Europe where Monkeypox has been reported, other areas reporting Monkeypox, cases or had close contact with a person sick with Monkeypox in the last 5-21 days.
    How to Prevent Person-to-Person Transmission of Monkeypox
    • A patient is considered infectious 5 days prior to rash onset until crusting of skin lesions.
    • Person-to-person transmission occurs through exposure to large respiratory droplets, which can be projected as far as 6 feet. It can also be transmitted by way of exposure to mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth), direct contact with body fluids or lesions, and indirect contact with lesions, such as through contaminated clothing or linens.
    PPE for EMS Personnel Managing Patients Suspected of Infection with Monkeypox
    • To guard against the possibility of airborne transmission, EMS personnel should strictly adhere to standard, contact, and airborne precautions. This includes a NIOSH-approved, fit-tested N-95 respirator, gown, gloves, and eye protection with face shield or goggles.
    Implementing a Hierarchy of Controls in EMS Care
    • Separate the driver compartment from the patient compartment.
    • Turn the exhaust fan on high in the patient compartment, if so equipped.
    • Adjust air handling to introduce fresh air in both compartments if possible.
    • Driver of ambulance should wear an N-95 respirator if isolation of driver compartment cannot be verified.
    • Limit the number of personnel making patient contact.
    • Use PPE checklists for donning and doffing, ideally with a trained observer. See NETEC’s guide on the role of the trained observer.
    • Exercise caution when performing aerosol-producing procedures, e.g., endotracheal intubation, airway suctioning, CPAP/BiPAP, CPR. Only perform these procedures if medically necessary and cannot be postponed.
    • Clean and disinfect all surfaces of the ambulance and equipment with an EPA-registered hospital grade disinfectant. Look for disinfectants with a label claim against vaccinia.
    Infection Prevention and Waste Management When Caring for a Patient with Monkeypox
    • Apply a surgical mask to the patient if tolerated and consider covering the patient with an impervious sheet if rash is present.
    • Monitor personnel for signs and symptoms of illness for 21 days after transport if the patient is confirmed to have Monkeypox.
    • More guidance can be found in the EMS Infectious Disease Playbook in the “Special Respiratory Precautions” section.
    • Monkeypox contaminated waste must be managed as a Category A waste pathogen, requiring specific waste handling, transporting, and final disposal protocols. To determine if this waste may be exempt from category A Infectious Substance Regulations, contact the local public health authorities for further guidance.
    • View the CDC’s Guide, “Managing Solid Waste Contaminated with a Category A Infectious Substance,” to learn more.
    Have a question about infection control and management, how to effectively use your PPE, or waste management for a Monkeypox case? Get an answer from a NETEC expert: send us your question today!
    Informing Health Care Personnel and Public Health Authorities of a Suspected Case of Monkeypox
    • If you suspect a case of Monkeypox, contact your state health department for possible initiation of special pathogen transport protocols. State of Iowa Duty Officer 24/7 reporting 1-800-362-2736 or the CDC Emergency Operations Center 1-770-488-7100.
    • Inform other responding personnel if a risk of Monkeypox is suspected and prevent unprotected exposure to the patient.
    • Inform supervisory personnel – some communities may have dedicated transport teams and/or designated facilities for transport and management of patients suspected or confirmed to be infected with special pathogens.
    • Inform the receiving facility, as soon as possible, that you suspect a patient may be infected with Monkeypox, so that space is made available to properly isolate the patient on arrival (airborne isolation room if available) and that receiving healthcare personnel are in appropriate PPE."

    I don't care to get this virus.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    8,333
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-61532083.amp

    Over 80 cases in 12 countries.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    America
    Posts
    105,801
    Quote Originally Posted by ciaban2.0 View Post
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-61532083.amp

    Over 80 cases in 12 countries.
    Seems it’s time once again to start masking up. Monkey pox spreads the same way as other diseases like COVID and the cold.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    8,333
    Quote Originally Posted by dbroncos78087 View Post
    Seems it’s time once again to start masking up. Monkey pox spreads the same way as other diseases like COVID and the cold.
    I'll make sure to wear a mask the next time I **** a monkey.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    parts unknown
    Posts
    67,086
    Quote Originally Posted by ciaban2.0 View Post
    I'll make sure to wear a mask the next time I **** a monkey.
    You should also take PREP


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Rep Power: 0




    Quote Originally Posted by Raps08-09 Champ View Post
    My dick is named 'Ewing'.

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •