Like us on Facebook


Follow us on Twitter





Page 5 of 11 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 162
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    13,503
    Quote Originally Posted by ccugrad1 View Post
    I just have never figured out why baseball would even consider a floor simply because salaries are too far gone to make it even feasible. According to Spottrac, the Orioles payroll this past year was $53,755,204, so roughly 47 million below a 100 million dollar floor. The Orioles were 52-110. So let's spend 47 million last year for the Orioles:

    SS Didi Gregorius-- 2 years, 28 million (14 million per year)
    SP Jake Odorizzi-- 3 years, 23.5 million (7.8 million per year)
    SP Jose Quintana-- 1 year, 8 million
    CF Jackie Bradley Jr-- 2 years, 24 million (12 million per year)
    RP Kirby Yates-- 1 year 5.5 million

    So right there is 47.3 million and here is what you got out of that:

    Gregorius-- 14 HR, 53 RBI, .209 BA
    Odorizzi-- 6-7 with a 4.21 ERA
    Quintana-- 0-3 with a 6.42 ERA
    Bradley Jr-- 6 HR, 29 RBI, .163 BA
    Yates-- Nothing, ended up having Tommy John Surgery

    Are the Orioles in any better shape with that extra 47 million payroll?
    I mean, yes, if they happened to spend all the money on the worst FA values, then it would be bad.

    But like others said, it would be gradual and the smart teams would plan. If you're bad, instead of paying your 1st year players dirt for 3 years, buyout their arb with a flattened contract. If you're planning for the future, you should rarely need to sign someone just to sign someone. And even then, you could potentially eat a contract in a trade and get a prospect.

    I think the issue and I'm guessing at least some owners agree is that bad, small market teams can slash payroll, get huge payments from the other teams in profit sharing, and claim a rebuild as a reason not to be competitive.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,758
    Quote Originally Posted by koldjerky View Post
    If the NL has to move things around to adjust how does that give them an advantage?

    I know thereís imbalance and it needs to end I just donít think itís the NL who has the advantage.
    Once the rules change, you are 100% right, until the NL rebalances, the advantage is for the AL. However until we have universal rules the advantage is always for the NL unless you feel the AL is always the better.
    My Ignore List: bklynny67, crovash, nastynice, OhSoSlick, spliff(TONE), zmaster52

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bethlehem
    Posts
    45,380
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    Once the rules change, you are 100% right, until the NL rebalances, the advantage is for the AL. However until we have universal rules the advantage is always for the NL unless you feel the AL is always the better.
    I think whoever has the DH is at an advantage.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of Blades View Post
    I don't consider Brand New indie. I consider them ****ing awesome and don't belong to a genre.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,758
    Quote Originally Posted by koldjerky View Post
    I think whoever has the DH is at an advantage.
    That's money the AL can't use elsewhere. They lose the DH in NL parks. How is it an advantage?
    My Ignore List: bklynny67, crovash, nastynice, OhSoSlick, spliff(TONE), zmaster52

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    44,928
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    That's money the AL can't use elsewhere. They lose the DH in NL parks. How is it an advantage?
    Yeah and AL teams gain an extra solid bat in their lineup. Something NL teams can't use because there is no DH. How you think adding a hitter 20-40% better than league average (because you don't DH unless you hit well) is a disadvantage amazes me.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,758
    Quote Originally Posted by metswon69 View Post
    Yeah and AL teams gain an extra solid bat in their lineup. Something NL teams can't use because there is no DH. How you think adding a hitter 20-40% better than league average (because you don't DH unless you hit well) is a disadvantage amazes me.
    They don't gain anything. They spend money at a position that the NL doesn't have to. That allows the NL to spend more where the AL team cannot.
    My Ignore List: bklynny67, crovash, nastynice, OhSoSlick, spliff(TONE), zmaster52

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    44,928
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    They don't gain anything. They spend money at a position that the NL doesn't have to. That allows the NL to spend more where the AL team cannot.
    Yeah and they get a bat that is significantly better than anything NL teams carry on their bench. Not to mention said NL teams can't use said bat for 500 or 600 PA because they have to let the pitchers spot hit. I don't see how you think more offense is a disadvantage. Tell that to the 2018 Red Sox and JD Martinez or the 2013 Red Sox and David Ortiz.
    Last edited by metswon69; 11-12-2021 at 10:54 AM.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,758
    Quote Originally Posted by metswon69 View Post
    Yeah and they get a bat that is significantly better than anything NL teams carry on their bench. Not to mention said NL teams can't use said bat for 500 or 600 PA because they have to let the pitchers spot hit. I don't see how you think more offense is a disadvantage. Tell that to the 2018 Red Sox and JD Martinez or the 2013 Red Sox and David Ortiz.
    If the argument is that the AL is superior, then you are correct.
    If the answer is the teams are equal, then the rules in play is what makes things unfair for the AL in IL play.
    The teams, in my eyes, are equal. The AL spends money on a DH where the NL spends money on a better pitcher and say a second baseman. They both use the money, but used differently. So if the rules were the same, great, the teams are equal. But the rules only favor the NL and that has to go one way or the other.
    My Ignore List: bklynny67, crovash, nastynice, OhSoSlick, spliff(TONE), zmaster52

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    44,928
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    If the argument is that the AL is superior, then you are correct.
    If the answer is the teams are equal, then the rules in play is what makes things unfair for the AL in IL play.
    The teams, in my eyes, are equal. The AL spends money on a DH where the NL spends money on a better pitcher and say a second baseman. They both use the money, but used differently. So if the rules were the same, great, the teams are equal. But the rules only favor the NL and that has to go one way or the other.
    Are teams consistently pumping significant money in the DH spot though? I mean you do have teams that do like the Red Sox and Yankees but plenty of teams just rotate positional players to DH, or they give one of their better bench bats more PA. Or if they're really lucky you have a guy like Ohtani who is a beast offensively and is paid next to nothing.

    I get that NL teams can focus their money elsewhere but DH's have to hit to stay at DH so you're getting a productive piece there in most cases no matter what and its offense that NL teams don't get that type of production from.
    Last edited by metswon69; 11-12-2021 at 11:19 AM.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,758
    Quote Originally Posted by metswon69 View Post
    Are teams consistently pumping significant money in the DH spot though? I mean you do have teams that do like the Red Sox and Yankees but plenty of teams just rotate positional players to DH, or they give one of their better bench bats more PA. Or if they're really lucky you have a guy like Ohtani who is a beast offensively and is paid next to nothing.

    I get that NL teams can focus their money elsewhere but DH's have to hit to stay at DH so you're getting a productive piece there in most cases no matter what and its offense that NL teams don't get that type of production from.
    Pump money? No. Regular DH spot? Pretty much yes.

    Oh, I agree, the DH adds more offense. Just like removing a pitcher for any batter (minus othani, side note: totally amazing what he did this year) adds more offense. And the pitching is just easier in the NL than the AL which means getting a more dominant pitcher in the NL goes farther since they don't face a lineup of 9, but more like 7.5 (walk/pitch around 8 to get to the pitcher).
    My Ignore List: bklynny67, crovash, nastynice, OhSoSlick, spliff(TONE), zmaster52

  11. #71
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    63,077
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    Once the rules change, you are 100% right, until the NL rebalances, the advantage is for the AL. However until we have universal rules the advantage is always for the NL unless you feel the AL is always the better.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    63,077
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    That's money the AL can't use elsewhere. They lose the DH in NL parks. How is it an advantage?

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bethlehem
    Posts
    45,380
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    That's money the AL can't use elsewhere. They lose the DH in NL parks. How is it an advantage?
    If a bat only DH that costs 8 mil and a ok SP cost 12 mil produces more than a subpar bat but ok fielding 2B and 3B cost 10 mil together and an ok SP cost 10 mil. Who has better value?

    Offense in baseball is more valuable than defense, normally.

    So you give 20 mil to an AL team to spend on DH and pitching theyíll most likely get more value than an NL team spending 20 on SP and two other positions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of Blades View Post
    I don't consider Brand New indie. I consider them ****ing awesome and don't belong to a genre.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,758
    Quote Originally Posted by koldjerky View Post
    If a bat only DH that costs 8 mil and a ok SP cost 12 mil produces more than a subpar bat but ok fielding 2B and 3B cost 10 mil together and an ok SP cost 10 mil. Who has better value?

    Offense in baseball is more valuable than defense, normally.

    So you give 20 mil to an AL team to spend on DH and pitching theyíll most likely get more value than an NL team spending 20 on SP and two other positions.
    In this example you have the AL covering two spots and the NL covering three with the same money. If it's SP and say 2b for the NL, the NL team probably gets more value. The AL has to account for a primary position that the NL simply does not have to.
    My Ignore List: bklynny67, crovash, nastynice, OhSoSlick, spliff(TONE), zmaster52

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,104
    Quote Originally Posted by crewfan13 View Post
    I mean I think everyone acknowledges that, but you're not going to fix one without fixing the other. If big markets are forced to revenue share, you damn well better believe that they are going to want to make sure the teams they are giving money to are actually spending it.
    I donít think anyone is acknowledging it. Itís obvious because people are only talking about how they spend money. Making someone spend more money doesnít make them richer and making someone spend less doesnít make them poorer. Fix the revenue inequity (pool TV revenue) and then see if you still need to force spending habits.

Page 5 of 11 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •