Like us on Facebook


Follow us on Twitter





Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11,711

    The Athletic runs expose on the Eagles organizational collapse

    https://theathletic.com/2506187/2021...e-roseman/?amp

    Paywalled, so here's the article:

    By Sheil Kapadia, Bo Wulf and Zach Berman

    Apr 12, 2021

    "Four weeks into the 2019 season, Doug Pederson sat down for his scheduled inquisition.

    The Tuesday tribunals with team owner Jeffrey Lurie and general manager Howie Roseman were a weekly occurrence during Pederson’s five-year tenure as Eagles head coach. In the meetings, Lurie and Roseman questioned Pederson about all aspects of his game management the week prior. Fourth-down decision-making, play calling, personnel choices — everything was on the table.

    Days earlier, the team overcame a 10-0 second-quarter deficit to beat Aaron Rodgers and the Packers 34-27 and even its record at 2-2. The offensive key to the win was a steady dose of the running game that took advantage of Green Bay’s defensive game plan.

    Apparently, that wasn’t good enough. Lurie, who has long advocated the use of analytics, wanted to know why Pederson hadn’t called more passing plays. The interrogation was the same after another win that season — this time in Buffalo on a day with 23 mph winds.
    Last edited by Rush; 04-19-2021 at 12:41 PM. Reason: Please include only snippets of articles. We cannot include full paywalled articles.
    Dak: 17,634 @ 66.0%, 7.7 per att, 106+24 TD, 40 INT+34 FMB, 97.3 Rate
    Wentz: 16,811 @ 62.7%, 6.7 per att, 113+8 TD, 50 INT+58 FMB, 89.2 Rate

    Quote Originally Posted by manbearchef View Post
    I'll eat a shoe if BB is still coaching in 5 years.
    Quote Originally Posted by BDawk4Prez View Post
    Sticking to traditions:

    IF Wentz is a Philadelphia Eagle in 2021, he will be the starter. If not, bye bye PSD, I'll leave.
    "Hater" is a term used by weak minded people in the face of legitimate criticism.
    -Scott van Pelt

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11,711
    " When Lurie and Roseman decided to trade Wentz this offseason, they acknowledged the move reflected an organizational failure. In January, Roseman described Wentz as being like one of the fingers on his hand. “You can’t even imagine that they are not part of you,” Roseman said.

    Nobody in the organization could’ve seen Wentz’s 2020 disaster coming, and nobody has a great explanation for why he performed like one of the NFL’s worst starting quarterbacks. Some pointed to his supporting cast and the injuries on the offensive line. Others said it was a coaching staff that ran out of ideas to help him.

    And then there’s the Jalen Hurts theory. The Eagles’ decision to select Hurts in the second round last April caught many in the organization by surprise. When explaining the pick, Roseman said the Eagles wanted to be a “quarterback factory,” a comment he now wishes he could have back. Roseman thought he could snag a competent backup quarterback with upside at a low cost, and Lurie was all for the move. What they both underestimated was how the young players on the roster, particularly those who didn’t have a history with Wentz, would gravitate toward Hurts.

    Some in the organization thought it shouldn’t have been an issue. Wentz had received a $128 million contract extension from the team, and in the eyes of some, Lurie and Roseman had coddled him throughout his tenure.

    On the other hand, Wentz had experienced a turbulent four seasons in Philadelphia. Nick Foles led the team on its Super Bowl run in 2017 and to the divisional round of the playoffs the following year after Wentz suffered a pair of successive season-ending injuries. In 2019, Wentz suffered a concussion in the first quarter of the only playoff game he’s appeared in. In between it all, there were anonymous leaks suggesting that Wentz needed to do a better job connecting with teammates.

    Multiple sources said the loss of Reich after 2017 played a role in Wentz’s regression. It wasn’t just that Reich had a connection with Wentz. One source described him as Pederson’s glue, a supportive right-hand man who served as a valuable intermediary.

    The relationship between head coach and quarterback deteriorated as things went south in 2020. One source described Wentz as smarter than most of the coaches on staff, but that meant he wanted to control the game at the line of scrimmage with checks and audibles. His pre-snap orchestrations led to confusion among the other players and resulted in guys not being on the same page. Pederson struggled to find a balance between empowering Wentz and reining him in.

    The overall issues in 2020 were exacerbated by a series of personnel misses. Roseman has admitted that he thought the Eagles had a Super Bowl window as justification for giving up draft picks to acquire players like Golden Tate, Genard Avery and Darius Slay. As a result of his overall philosophy, the organization made just 10 total picks in 2018 and 2019.

    The Eagles traded up in the first round for tackle Andre Dillard in 2019, and he has started just four games in two seasons. Arcega-Whiteside has just 254 receiving yards in two seasons. It’s too soon to judge Reagor, but it will be impossible to discuss his career without acknowledging the Eagles took him one spot ahead of Minnesota’s Justin Jefferson, who already looks like a star.

    Meanwhile, Roseman leaned on contract restructures with veterans to free up immediate cap space. The old, expensive team, combined with the draft misses, played a large role in last year’s disaster and the current state of the roster.

    In the end, 2020 was bad enough that Lurie would have been justified in moving on from Pederson, Wentz and Roseman. But he opted for just two of the three.

    Lurie is fond of Pederson on a personal level but was frustrated by the offensive failures and Pederson’s decisions with his coaching staff. Wentz wanted a fresh start, but if the Eagles believed strongly that he could fix his flaws and get them back to the Super Bowl, they had enough leverage to keep him. Instead, they decided to maximize draft compensation while it was still on the table and get their cap in order for 2022 and beyond.

    The sense is that they’ll give Hurts a shot in 2021 — a decision that one source said was largely being pushed by Lurie — and revisit the quarterback position after the season. Even when they mapped out their worst-case scenarios, this is not where they expected to be.

    The Eagles effectively tanked the final game of the 2020 regular season, but the expectation immediately after the loss was that Pederson would return for his sixth season. He survived “Black Monday” and fulfilled his end-of-season duties. All that awaited was a meeting with Lurie.

    But one discussion was not enough. Much like the end of the 2019 season, there were disagreements about Pederson’s staff that stretched into a follow-up meeting. That’s when the Eagles made the change.

    Lurie called it a “difference in vision,” as the owner was focused on “the mid term and long term and not on how to maximize 2021,” while Pederson wanted to retain familiar coaches who could allow for a “smoother 2021” season. Even Lurie acknowledged that Pederson “did not deserve to be let go,” but it became clear that the Eagles would need a different voice for what the owner termed a “transition period” with the roster.

    When Lurie held a video news conference in January to explain Pederson’s firing, he fielded multiple questions about his evaluation of Roseman: Why was the coach dismissed, but not the general manager? Lurie seemed almost incredulous that Roseman was a subject of intrigue.

    A week later than other teams with coaching vacancies, Lurie kicked off a search that started with 25 candidates and was pared down to 10 for interviews. Sirianni was not considered a front-runner for the job at the outset. He didn’t interview elsewhere in 2021 and was not among the initial wave of interviewees.

    In the phone call offering Sirianni the job, Lurie stated that he was “so incredibly excited for the coach you are and the coach you can become.” An outside perception lingers that Sirianni offered the Eagles a coach of least resistance for management’s involvement. The same was said about Pederson five years ago.

    The Eagles enter the 2021 offseason program with fewer familiar faces. For a growing number of employees at the NovaCare Complex, the Lombardi Trophy is more a vestige of a previous era than a shared memory.

    “The surprise factor (is) that it happened so quickly,” one source said. “Perhaps it’s not surprising given the culture of the organization.”

    But others presented the idea that the drop-off wasn’t dramatic. Perhaps the Super Bowl season was actually the outlier.

    There’s also the thought that even passable quarterback play would have obscured some of the problems that appeared glaring in the absence of it. If Wentz was merely a mediocre quarterback last season and the Eagles were merely a mediocre team, there would be less blame required.

    Lurie keeps a handwritten checklist in the top drawer next to his bed with the tenets he believes are necessary for a successful organization. Among them are a dynamic head coach, a franchise quarterback and an innovative personnel executive. Roseman is the only one in the triumvirate who remains from the Super Bowl campaign. As he begins his fourth partnership with a head coach, Roseman’s survival instincts are thus far unmatched.

    In January 2016, when the Eagles hired Pederson, a question was posed to Pederson and Lurie in the introductory news conference asking for clarity about who possessed final say over the roster.

    “I know this,” said Pederson. “It’s a collaborative effort.”

    And who breaks the tie?

    Lurie, standing a few feet to Pederson’s right, raised his hand. Laughter filled the auditorium. "

    Zach Berman covers the Philadelphia Eagles for The Athletic. He spent seven seasons as the Eagles beat writer for The Philadelphia Inquirer and wrote the 2018 book, UNDERDOGS: The Philadelphia Eagles' Emotional Road to Super Bowl Victory. He previously covered the New York Giants for the Newark Star-Ledger and the University of Virginia/Virginia Tech for The Washington Post, and was a contributor for The New York Times. He's also appeared on NBC Sports Philadelphia since 2011.

    Follow Zach Berman on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ZBerm?s=09

    Sheil Kapadia writes about the NFL for The Athletic. He previously covered the Philadelphia Eagles for The Athletic and for Philadelphia Magazine's Birds 24/7 site. Sheil also covered the Seattle Seahawks for ESPN.?

    Follow Sheil Kapadia on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SheilKapadia?s=09

    Bo Wulf is a staff writer for The Athletic covering the Philadelphia Eagles. Previously, he was a senior content manager for Taylor Sports and a producer for the Philadelphia Eagles website.

    Follow Bo Wulf on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Bo_Wulf?s=09
    Last bit was too long.
    Dak: 17,634 @ 66.0%, 7.7 per att, 106+24 TD, 40 INT+34 FMB, 97.3 Rate
    Wentz: 16,811 @ 62.7%, 6.7 per att, 113+8 TD, 50 INT+58 FMB, 89.2 Rate

    Quote Originally Posted by manbearchef View Post
    I'll eat a shoe if BB is still coaching in 5 years.
    Quote Originally Posted by BDawk4Prez View Post
    Sticking to traditions:

    IF Wentz is a Philadelphia Eagle in 2021, he will be the starter. If not, bye bye PSD, I'll leave.
    "Hater" is a term used by weak minded people in the face of legitimate criticism.
    -Scott van Pelt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    [emoji288]
    Posts
    21,135
    Thanks for copying it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    10,505
    Quote Originally Posted by Bullseyed View Post
    Last bit was too long.
    In all fairness Roseman didn’t say which finger.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    117,893
    I assume the short version is Howie is a moron and wentz is a giant ****ing baby?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    17,759
    Lol ohhhh well

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,850
    Quote Originally Posted by More-Than-Most View Post
    I assume the short version is Howie is a moron and wentz is a giant ****ing baby?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    [emoji288]
    Posts
    21,135
    Quote Originally Posted by More-Than-Most View Post
    I assume the short version is Howie is a moron and wentz is a giant ****ing baby?
    No, it's about how happy you should be your team doesn't have vain trust fund kid as an owner.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11,711
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.B View Post
    In all fairness Roseman didn’t say which finger.
    It was over the PSD character limit for posts.
    Dak: 17,634 @ 66.0%, 7.7 per att, 106+24 TD, 40 INT+34 FMB, 97.3 Rate
    Wentz: 16,811 @ 62.7%, 6.7 per att, 113+8 TD, 50 INT+58 FMB, 89.2 Rate

    Quote Originally Posted by manbearchef View Post
    I'll eat a shoe if BB is still coaching in 5 years.
    Quote Originally Posted by BDawk4Prez View Post
    Sticking to traditions:

    IF Wentz is a Philadelphia Eagle in 2021, he will be the starter. If not, bye bye PSD, I'll leave.
    "Hater" is a term used by weak minded people in the face of legitimate criticism.
    -Scott van Pelt

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •