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  1. #496
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    13,542
    Quote Originally Posted by spliff(TONE) View Post
    I'd rather have one that has done both.
    Typically you donít get both...

  2. #497
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    58,399
    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc77 View Post
    Iíd say itís more based on my professional experience than my personal.
    Sounds like both actually.

  3. #498
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    58,399
    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc77 View Post
    Typically you donít get both...
    As long as I don't get catman.

  4. #499
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Rogers Centre
    Posts
    25,141
    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc77 View Post
    I know nurses do co-op placements while in college. Most medical professionals do. Why couldnít this be done without college though?
    Because there's a lot of stuff you have to learn about the human body and all those fancy machines they use to keep said bodies alive. Chances are it takes a few years to learn all that stuff.
    Quote Originally Posted by ChongInc. View Post
    Facts can be hypothetical.

  5. #500
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    39,682
    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc77 View Post
    Typically you donít get both...
    Of course you do. Where are you going that they don't have both?

  6. #501
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Modesto
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    2,889
    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc77 View Post
    Iím a consultant so not technically an accountant but a big part of my job in accounting and Iíve worked in accounting firms . Basic principles of accounting are better learned on the job than in a classroom.
    Our CPA who is the principal with at least 60 accountants on staff helps with business decisions, all decisions have multiple components, tax, income, financing, adjusted ebita for sales value, succession planning, cash flow.

    Our business finance manger has a degree in accounting and has at least 15 years at major accounting firms including doing specialty items like quick books support, computer support, his job is all the day to day, internal FS, reports for the bank all tax payments and calculations except income tax for the principals and corp (sub-s).

    There is a big difference in the skill set in what our CPA does, what a tax focused accountant does, and just keeping the books correct.

    I have shown my accountant sales tax for our industry which I learned fighting the state and winning a large refund (30+ years ago). My accountant at that time didn't want me to rock the boat and agreed with BOE on their interpretation. We hired our current accountant about 25 years ago when the previous accountant didn't show up for the corporate end of year planning at our lawyers office and our lawyer told us to call our current accountant, he would be better for our business.
    "He's getting the best job in baseball."

    Bruce Bochy sent a clear message to whoever will be the Giants' next manager
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  7. #502
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    40,454
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    That's after they dropped 80K+ in the last 15 years.
    Where in that link do you see that?

  8. #503
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    38,626
    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc77 View Post
    In no way was I putting down nurses. I couldnít do any job in the medical field. My point is in 2020 we carry computers in our pockets. If you wanted to learn the basics of nursing, you could do so without spending a fortune to earn a degree.
    lol, wtf?



    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  9. #504
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    38,626
    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc77 View Post
    Typically you donít get both...
    Typically a nurse goes to school and trains on site before graduation.

    Literally every nurse who isnt on their first day has done both.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  10. #505
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    3,022
    Quote Originally Posted by metswon69 View Post
    Where in that link do you see that?
    Sorry that you have not owned a home or just bought one "recently"
    My Ignore List: bklynny67, nastynice, OhSoSlick, spliff(TONE), zmaster52

  11. #506
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn
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    40,454
    Quote Originally Posted by brett05 View Post
    Sorry that you have not owned a home or just bought one "recently"
    I dont need to own a home to know that they haven't "dropped 80K in the last 15 years". Owning a home has exponentially gone up and for obvious reasons. In most cases they are appreciable assets that people use as investments whether to borrow against or eventually sell.

    What's so difficult about quoting your sources btw? I don't buy much of what you talk about anyways but at the very least if you're going to make a claim like that, show the work.

  12. #507
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Modesto
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    2,889
    Quote Originally Posted by metswon69 View Post
    I dont need to own a home to know that they haven't "dropped 80K in the last 15 years". Owning a home has exponentially gone up and for obvious reasons. In most cases they are appreciable assets that people use as investments whether to borrow against or eventually sell.

    What's so difficult about quoting your sources btw? I don't buy much of what you talk about anyways but at the very least if you're going to make a claim like that, show the work.
    A home is shelter first, not an investment asset; that the lending market has convinced people to use there primary shelter for more than shelter does not make it solid logic.

    If your home drops like mine does (indicated below) and you need access to assets they aren't there. Most people roll one home into a move up home until they die or move into assisted living so you are constantly moving your equity with you.


    My house is still not back to the the pre 2008 value, 15 years later its 26% ($160,000) less than what it was appraised for in 2006, I purchased in 1998 and took out a HELOC at the end of 2006. When I needed the money in 2009 they had clawed back my HELOC and it would not appraise per their new guidelines.

    $11 per hour with good credit can afford a 100k home with a $687 monthly payment.
    https://www.realtor.com/mortgage/too...ty-calculator/

    I think if you are not on a coast or major city there are lots of opportunities in areas to buy a starter home at a 100k
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/real...0k/ss-BB1dApdy
    Last edited by SfgiantsJD3; 03-02-2021 at 03:45 PM.
    "He's getting the best job in baseball."

    Bruce Bochy sent a clear message to whoever will be the Giants' next manager
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  13. #508
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    40,454
    Quote Originally Posted by SfgiantsJD3 View Post
    My house is still not back to the the pre 2008 value, 15 years later its 26% ($160,000) less than what it was appraised for in 2006, I purchased in 1998 and took out a HELOC at the end of 2006.

    $11 per hour with good credit can afford a 100k home with a $687 monthly payment.
    https://www.realtor.com/mortgage/too...ty-calculator/

    I think if you are not on a coast or major city there are lots of opportunities in areas to buy a starter home at a 100k
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/real...0k/ss-BB1dApdy
    I'm aware of the primary use of a home, thanks. I'm saying it can be an asset that you either borrow against or eventually sell at an appreciable price than you bought it for.

    Sure, if you want to live in economically depressed areas like Syracuse and Binghamton NY. Look, I get the mortgage backed security crisis in 2007 and 2008 affected home values but that doesn't change the fact that said market has rebounded quite well in the last 8-10 years. Yeah if you completely leave out the housing bubble bursting in the mid 2000s. A lot of that was market correction. My aunt bought a home in Long Island in 1998 for 175 thousand dollars. In 2004, she sold that same house for 450 thousand. There's no way in 6 years a home should have jumped that price with no renovation.

    It's doable but leaving you 1200 bucks a month to cover food, electricity, heat, insurance (home and car), other expenditures, isn't much.
    Last edited by metswon69; 03-02-2021 at 04:01 PM.

  14. #509
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    16,753
    Quote Originally Posted by joeyc77 View Post
    In no way was I putting down nurses. I couldnít do any job in the medical field. My point is in 2020 we carry computers in our pockets. If you wanted to learn the basics of nursing, you could do so without spending a fortune to earn a degree.
    If you want to go with a Google nurse, your choice.
    It wouldn't be mine.
    gotta love 'referential' treatment

  15. #510
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    39,682
    Quote Originally Posted by SfgiantsJD3 View Post
    A home is shelter first, not an investment asset; that the lending market has convinced people to use there primary shelter for more than shelter does not make it solid logic.

    If your home drops like mine does (indicated below) and you need access to assets they aren't there. Most people roll one home into a move up home until they die or move into assisted living so you are constantly moving your equity with you.


    My house is still not back to the the pre 2008 value, 15 years later its 26% ($160,000) less than what it was appraised for in 2006, I purchased in 1998 and took out a HELOC at the end of 2006. When I needed the money in 2009 they had clawed back my HELOC and it would not appraise per their new guidelines.

    $11 per hour with good credit can afford a 100k home with a $687 monthly payment.
    https://www.realtor.com/mortgage/too...ty-calculator/

    I think if you are not on a coast or major city there are lots of opportunities in areas to buy a starter home at a 100k
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/real...0k/ss-BB1dApdy
    I mean, a $687 mortgage is $8,244 a year. someone who makes $11 on a 40 hour workweek makes $22,880. Meaning their mortgage payment is 35% of their gross pay. After the mortgage is taken out, they are at $14,636 gross pay. That means they have $1,220 a month for utilities, food, gas, taxes, etc.

    It's possible, but I'd venture to say most who make $11 would probably need some help to afford a house.

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