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  1. #91
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    So I've been thinking...this year we got 8 picks in the first 5 rounds (1,3,3,4,4,4,5,5). I feel this year we need to draft quality of quantity. Which means I'd be perfectly fine packaging a third and fourth to move up to the second (likely late second). But of course I'm also ok moving down in the first if the guy we want is either gone or we feel we can get him a bit later.

  2. #92
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    Hey I've got The Draft Networks premium so if there is a player that you want a full report on just list him. Not everyone has it but most that are 1st and 2nd round potential have it.

  3. #93
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    Did a lot of moving around with this one. Moved back twice and got some additional ammo to move up and get guys I wanted. 5 potential starters from the get go. Carman intrigues me with his size and is projected to move to guard. Jones has major potential it seems. Barmore seems more likely to go in the 1st but I'll take it lol.

    27.

    Minnesota Vikings
    Alijah Vera-Tucker
    IOL, USC
    40.

    Tampa Bay Vikings
    Christian Barmore
    IDL, Alabama
    61.

    Miami Vikings
    Jackson Carman
    OT, Clemson
    75.

    Tampa Bay Vikings
    Paris Ford
    S, Pittsburgh
    84.

    Minnesota Vikings
    Patrick Jones II
    EDGE, Pittsburgh

  4. #94
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    I'll list some guys that are likely targeted at 14

    PROSPECT SUMMARY - KWITY PAYE
    Kwity Paye is an exciting prospect whose potential and physical ability is only now beginning to be realized on the gridiron. There's an extremely high ceiling in Paye's game thanks to his athletic abilities; if his NFL team is able to continue to draw fundamental improvements out of him to allow him to continue to simply react to discard or defeat blocks, he'll be in line for plenty of explosive plays in opposing backfields. The steps Paye made in 2020 during the abbreviated season should only further fuel optimism that his development is still on an upward trajectory. Paye has won in the past most sufficiently from tight alignments and utilized his powerful hands and functional strength to diminish angles and find creases to press through and rally to the football. I do feel he's a bit more of a linear athlete and his ability to collapse tackle sets with speed to power is going to shine more frequently than his reps when looking to crash off the edge and win with finesse. Paye has been forged by fire through a challenging upbringing as an immigrant and finds his "why" in taking care of his familyóhe's internally driven and appears to be the kind of individual you want in your building to buy into the process. He's a home run from an intangibles, effort, and tools perspective, but his scheme fit is an important accommodation to make for optimal success.

    Ideal Role: Starting defensive end (hand in dirt)

    Scheme Fit: Even front, single-gap defense.

    FILM EVALUATION
    Written by Kyle Crabbs

    Games watched: Wisconsin (2019), Penn State (2019), Ohio State (2019), Alabama (2019), Minnesota (2020), Michigan State (2020), Penn State (2020)

    Best Game Studied: Minnesota (2020)

    Worst Game Studied: Alabama (2019)

    First Step Explosiveness: The raw power his frame affords him is excellent and while his snap anticipation hasn't always been on par, he's got the ability to gain ground with suddenness and get into the lap of offensive tackles quickly. His twitch is more valuable in softening angles and collapsing tackles to roll through half a man than it is to dip the inside shoulder and take the edge.

    Flexibility: His natural athleticism shows more in space than it does when he's charged with reducing the shoulder and crashing off the edge, although he was markedly better in that regard through Michigan's abbreviated season in 2020. There's plenty of hip and knee coil to bend and play below the pads of blockers when playing in alignment; won't often catch him without leverage when fitting up blocks.

    Hand Counters: This was a self-described area of improvement this offseason when he spoke with TDN's Jordan Reid and he quickly illustrated improvements to discard blocks and offer more versatility in winning at first contact in 2020 debut vs. Minnesota. Paye has powerful hands and should have plenty of success in his bull, club, push/pull, and long-arm techniques as he continues to develop. An instinctive feel for when to throw and what to throw is still a developing dynamic of his game.

    Length: He is physically capable of locking out his arms and successfully walling off blockers from leveraging him out of a gap. Separation skills are disciplined and make him difficult to uproot and move off the line of scrimmage in the run game, which aids in his success at the point of attack. There's room for improvement in flashing hands and coaxing tackles out of their sets prematurely with his length off the edge in his pass rush, but little indication he won't be able to make that progression eventually.

    Hand Power: Paye will beat you up at the point of attack, you better be ready to crack down on him for a full 60 minutes. He challenges double teams well thanks to his ability to crack the inside shoulder of the first arriving blocker. His punch and press will bubble the point of attack and derail backs looking to press the line of scrimmage to the perimeter, getting runs off schedule. As a pass rusher, pure power rushes, even from the interior, have created chaos.

    Run Defending: Paye has illustrated sound gap discipline from both the interior and the perimeter with his hand in the dirt. The first-step quickness in linear releases allows him to shoot gaps and settle before locating the football when required, but he's also fully capable of pressing and reading a block before progressing to the ball. Athletic prowess in short spaces allows him to quickly disengage and challenge ball carriers working into his gaps.

    Effort: It is easy to love what he offers as a rally defender, he'll work off the back side and has the range to chase down runs away just as he has the ability to work back to the quarterback on second and third effort plays to help corral opposing passers. Paye's path to the pros offers encouragement that he possesses the work ethic necessary to continue developing as a player and leveling up his game for his first few seasons in the NFL.

    Football IQ: Paye is an ascending prospect but that does mean that he's still green in some areas, especially his pass-rush plan and recruiting hand counters to defeat blocks in real-time. Progression is there and so is the awareness of the need for improvement, but nevertheless, he's not as far along as some other high-prized pass-rush prospects. Discipline is strong as a presence in tight alignments to not prematurely jump out of gaps or concede leverage.

    Lateral Mobility: If left in space and forced to play the mesh point, he should be plenty effective with his lateral agility and change of direction skills; he's highly fluid and nimble in such instances thanks to some degree to his awareness to not over-stride or overextend himself.

    Versatility: The Wolverines showed a willingness to move Paye all around the defensive frontóhe's taken reps in the A-gap on speed rush packages, and has been moved between the edge and the B-gap in base front looks as well. He's not a player that is going to find value in coverage, nor will he win from a two-point stance working as a 3-4 OLB given his stature.

    Prospect Comparison: Ezekiel Ansah (2013 NFL Draft, Detroit Lions)

    SCOUT GRADES
    TDN Consensus: To Be Determined

    Kyle Crabbs: 85.5/100

  5. #95
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    Slater
    PROSPECT SUMMARY - RASHAWN SLATER
    Rashawn Slater is a scheme diverse and positional flexible prospect who should offer a little something to everyone depending on what specific needs and traits are prioritized for any given franchise. Slater, who opted out of the 2020 college season and has not played since the end of the 2019 campaign, is well regarded for his fundamentals and functional athleticism along the front. Slater manned the left tackle position for the Wildcats. For teams that donít prioritize certain measurable thresholds, he appears to be a viable candidate to do the same in the NFLóbased specifically on his work against 2020 No. 2 overall pick Chase Young in pass protection. But Slaterís ceiling is likely lowest on the edge and the further into the heart of the line he transitions, the higher his potential is to become a perennial Pro Bowl player and potential All-Pro candidate in my eyes. Slater has tremendous cutoff abilities and clean, patient footwork working space and the necessary functional strength to hold his own on the interior. The position flexibility he offers ensures he can be a part of any NFL offensive lineís combination of best five players to start up front from Day 1.

    Ideal Role: Starting center (teams will be well within rights to let him fail outside and work in if preferred).

    Scheme Fit: Inside/outside zone heavy rushing attack to optimize lateral mobility, West Coast passing tendencies (if playing tackle).

    FILM EVALUATION
    Written by Kyle Crabbs

    Games watched: Stanford (2019), Michigan State (2019), Ohio State (2019), Iowa (2019)

    Best Game Studied: Ohio State (2019)

    Worst Game Studied: Michigan State (2019)

    Balance: Slaterís ability to work and slide down the line and sustain his posture and attach onto blocks late into reps is impressive. Heíll string out the point of attack well and still plays with power and control in such instances. His ability to gear down working up to the second level to pick off B-level flow to the football is excellent. In Slaterís sets, you donít often see him overextend himself or allow his weight to roll out over top of his toes; heís disciplined here and as a result clean to wait out finesse rushers but quick to anchor versus power.

    Pass Sets: Slater is at his best to get set quickly and look to diminish angles earlier in sets. I do believe heíd work fine in a vertical passing offense if required to, but there may be a transition period there as he acclimates to an offense that has the quarterback holding the ball and allowing more shallow angles for rushers off the edge. The ability to hold his ground off the edge buys Slater valuable wiggle room in his sets if tested by more athletic rushersóa trait heíll need if kept on the edge.

    Competitive Toughness: I love his tenacity. Because heís so well controlled in his movement skills and disciplined to avoid overextending himself, heís methodical with working to gain ground and push up the field when working off of double teams. He has plenty of functional strength to his game and he can go toe to toe with speed to power or, alternatively, defensive tackles if heís called upon inside. His effort on the backside of the play is a major plus and Slater will help pop off big runs as a result of cutting off defensive flow to the football.

    Lateral Mobility: Watching the Stanford game gave me a great appreciation for just how quickly he can get down the line and work cutoff against 3T and 1T defenders on outside zone if need be. That level of range laterally will definitely appeal to ZBS heavy teams. Although in pass protection, if left on an island, Slater should still be considered a plus with lateral movement thanks to disciplined feetóheíll redirect off his momentum well to challenge late stunt games in the pocket.

    Length: Slater isnít blessed with prototypical length to play on the perimeter, but he does have enough to meet the minimum threshold and as such, heíll likely only be eliminated from consideration on the outside by a handful of teams. The wingspan he does have is put to good use to provide a compact punch and generates plenty of power to stunt forward push from edge rushers. This will be a non-factor if working on the side.

    Football IQ: Slater is one of the 2021 NFL Draftís most savvy offensive line prospects and that comes without having taken a snap in 2020. Slater understands angles, he understands the value of space when left unattended or forced to wait out stunts or delayed rushes, and heís very fundamentally sound once heís attached to a block. As an added bonus beyond his versatility, Slater has already logged starts for the Wildcats on both sides of the offensive line and has been exposed to footwork and techniques to suit both the left and right.

    Hand Technique: Slater offers plenty of pop in his hands and has shown himself to be proficient in securing blocks and establishing his hands with a clean fit to sustain beyond first contact. Longer-armed defenders may test him if theyíre playing outside containment and force him to be perfect with his footwork and gaining ground to stay pressed onto blocks. His punch is compact and heís got plenty of power to stun. You have to appreciate how well he manipulates the point of attack to work across the face of defenders and provide space for his back to press through gaps.

    Anchor Ability: Watching Slater pull the e-brake on Chase Young told me all I need to know. Heíll give some ground at first contact before subsequently sitting down on his hips; he does a very good job of keeping his hips sunk and will steadily slow aggressive charges into the backfield while leaving his quarterback enough room to step up in the pocket. Exposure to both sides of the line ensures heíll be effective versus inside and outside alignments if charged with either fan or slide protection.

    Power at P.O.A.: Slater is definitely physical. Heís not a pure overwhelming road-grader and heís not going to consistently put defensive linemen on skates, but heíll rock them on their heels and gain a half-yard advantage into the defensive field of play with consistency. He gets much more movement on his zone concepts where his functional athleticism allows him to transition momentum into his advantage and out-leverage defenders trying to string out a play. Well built for the pro game already, there's little concern with his functional strength.

    Versatility: Genuinely feel as though he could play all five positions along the offensive line if need be. That kind of positional flexibility will be super valuable to his cause. The ceiling at tackle is fine but if teams want more of a high-impact player, kicking him inside and letting him climb up onto linebackers with greater frequency would produce excellent results. Any team looking to work him at center will simply need to vet his snapping consistency after a year layoff, but his physical skill set projects wonderfully to manning the middle and still handling power rushers if facing odd fronts.

    Prospect Comparison: Jonah Williams (2019 NFL Draft, Cincinnati Bengals)

    SCOUT GRADES
    TDN Consensus: To Be Determined

    Kyle Crabbs: 85/100

  6. #96
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    Rousseau
    PROSPECT SUMMARY - GREGORY ROUSSEAU
    Miami defensive end Gregory Rousseau produced 19.5 tackles for loss and 15.5 sacks in 2019, which is the last exposure we have of him playing college football as he opted out of the 2020 season and declared for the 2021 NFL Draft. While the production is eye-popping and he has an exciting physical skill set, his game is underdeveloped, which comes as no surprise given his relative newness to playing on the defensive line after a high school career where he primarily played wide receiver and safety. While Rousseauís frame and length jump off the tape, his lack of technical refinement, processing skills, and functional strength are concerning when projecting him to the next level. It will be important for the franchise that selects Rousseau to understand the need for patience with his development. Rousseau suffered a season-ending fractured ankle in 2018 after just two games and opted out of 2020, leaving 2019 as the only year of film to evaluate and his rawness was evident. With patience and development, Rousseau has the upside to become an impact defender that can play all across the defensive line in multiple fronts.

    Ideal Role: Starting defensive end that gets chances to rush from the interior.

    Scheme Fit: Can play in a defense that is multiple with its fronts.

    FILM EVALUATION
    Written by Joe Marino

    Games watched: Pittsburgh (2019), Florida State (2019), Louisville (2019), Florida (2019), Virginia (2019)

    Best Game Studied: Florida State (2019)

    Worst Game Studied: Louisville (2019)

    First-Step Explosiveness: Rousseau lacks explosiveness when releasing out of his stance which creates challenges creating a half-man relationship with his blocker and positioning himself favorably to attack the edges. He will occasionally shoot a gap and showcase some burst but if heís playing straight, his first step lacks suddenness. He does benefit from having long stride length, which helps him gain ground and mitigate his lack of initial burst.

    Flexibility: For his gangly frame, Rousseau has some impressive smoothness to his mobility, which mostly shows up when he executes a zone coverage drop. Additionally, he showcases good ankle flexion and there are plenty of reps where he gets his foot to catch well outside his frame and it enables him to make tight turns. With that said, he doesnít have loose hips which becomes problematic when heís trying to corner the outside hip of blockers and when attempting to reduce his surface area.

    Hand Counters: Rousseau generally does well to use his length to keep his pads clean, but he fails to blend his anatomical length with effective hand counters to clear contact in a way that translates to the next level. His game is missing the ability to counter and string together moves. While his hand placement is effective, he must develop a consistent repertoire of swipes and counters to maximize his playmaking potential in the NFL.

    Length: Rousseau has vines for arms, which he generally uses to his advantage in playing with extension and keeping his pads clean. Rousseauís length is a major asset as a tackler given how much it expands his tackle radiusówhich frequently shows up on film. His robust tackle for loss numbers are often a result of him playing with extension, keeping his pads clean, and positioning himself to disengage from blocks to finish, often taking advantage of his massive tackle radius.

    Hand Power: Rousseau looks the part of a compression-style defensive end with long arms and heavy hands, but the heavy hands component is missing. Rousseau needs to do a better job of activating his hands with urgency and generating more pop in his strikes to take control of reps. There arenít many instances where his punch stuns blockers and creates opportunities for Rousseau to dictate the down.

    Run Defending: Rousseau has a wiry frame that has plenty of room to add bulk to increase his mass and functional strength to hold up better at the point of attack. When Rousseau does get his hands placed, his length is a major asset in setting the edge and maintaining outside leverage. Unfortunately, Rousseauís inexperience at the position shows up regularly on running plays where his block and play diagnosing skills reveal inconsistency.

    Effort: Rousseau plays with good urgency on every rep and competes. He is routinely willing to pursue the football, even when the distance between him and the ball carrier is significant. Thereís a good chunk of the plays he made behind the line of scrimmage in 2019 that were a result of him continuing his effort to beat his man, get near the football, disengage and finish.

    Football IQ: Rousseau is still relatively new to the position after spending most of his high school career at wide receiver and safety. He does not consistently identify blocks and properly counter, leading to issues with him maintaining his gap integrity. There is a considerable lack of technical skills, primarily with his hands, that speak to a need to further learn the nuances of playing defensive line.

    Lateral Mobility: Rousseau is a fairly smooth athlete that doesnít labor to work down the line of scrimmage in pursuit. There are some impressive reps where he drops into space and showcases easy movement skills in all directions.

    Versatility: Rousseau primarily aligned at left end for Miami, but got some opportunities to play on the interior as well. With added functional strength and developed technique, Rousseau should offer the ability to play multiple spots along the defensive line in the NFL from a variety of fronts. Rousseau has the ability to be asset in zone coverage drops and on the field goal block unit on account of his length.

    Prospect Comparison: Tyler Brayton (2003 NFL Draft, Oakland Raiders)

    SCOUT GRADES
    TDN Consensus: To Be Determined

    Joe Marino: 81.5/100

  7. #97
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    Ossai
    PROSPECT SUMMARY Ė JOSEPH OSSAI
    Born and raised in Lagos, Nigeria, Ossai is one of five children that grew up in a tight-knit family. Playing strictly soccer growing up, he mentioned that he routinely played the sport after school or in the local neighborhood. His journey to the United States was an unexpected one as his mother entered her name into a Visa lottery in order to travel to the country. A year later, the family found out that they were winners of eight permanent U.S. residency cards. Houston, Texas is where their American journey began (Dec. 2009). Ossai was introduced to the game of football in the seventh grade. Starting out as a receiver, he didnít receive any playing time, but with the team needing replacements on the defensive line, Ossai jumped at the opportunity. Since that point, heís stayed at the position.

    While suiting up for the Longhorns, Ossai started in 24 of the 36 games that he participated in. Possessing a long frame that still has room to grow, heís an edge rusher thatís still figuring out how to utilize his present tools. Because of his natural athleticism, he spent time seesawing back and forth between off-ball linebacker and defensive end. As a result, he was unable to find his comfort zone while experimenting with both positions. It wasn't until his final season at Texas where he settled in as a true edge rusher. Showing more comfort from the stand-up position, Ossai is an explosive mover and contains lots of enthusiasm throughout multiple parts of his game. A motor that stays flaming hot, heís able to positively impact plays even if theyíre not intended in his direction. As a natural playmaker, he has a knack for being a turnover creator that can get the offense the ball back at crucial moments in games. Having powerful hands, heís a reactionary rusher that still has room to grow as an initiator with his pass rush moves. Still figuring out how to diagnose and attack run game concepts, heís continued to improve with the more reps that heís experienced at a single position. Ossai is raw in pass coverage when asked to drop to certain spots and itís an area that proves to be one of his biggest deficiencies.

    Ideal Role: Ossai can align as a 3-4 outside linebacker that is used as a spot dropper in coverage. Heís also capable of putting his hand in the dirt as a 5-technique in a four-man defensive front.

    Scheme Fit: 3-4 Outside Linebacker

    FILM EVALUATION
    Written by Jordan Reid

    Games watched: Utah (Alamo Bowl, 2019), Texas Tech (2020), TCU (2020), Oklahoma (2020), Oklahoma State (2020), Baylor (2020), Iowa State (2020).

    Best Game Studied: Utah (Alamo Bowl, 2019), Oklahoma State (2020), TCU (2020), Oklahoma (2020)

    Worst Game Studied: Iowa State (2020), Texas Tech (2020)

    First-Step Explosiveness: Ossai comes fast out of the starting blocks as heís experienced pre-snap stances as both a stand-up outside linebacker and with his hand on the ground. He shows to be much more comfortable when he can stand up and explode compared to coming from the ground and accelerating. Getting up the field quickly is an area that heís shown to be capable of consistently executing.

    Flexibility: The former Longhorn edge rusher has the bend necessary as a pass rusher to not only gain ground on the upfield shoulder of blockers, but he has the ankle flexion in order to bend, dip, and corner to the passer. Lowering his center of gravity to get underneath the arms of blockers is a technique that heís able to remain consistent with.

    Hand Counters: Ossai is keen in his pass rush approach. Possessing a variety of different moves, heís more of a counter mover compared to initiating the first move to dictate what he will do next. He was highly impactful as a reactionary edge rusher that forced offensive tackles to have constant answers to the counter moves that he deployed. Ossai is a quick and efficient operator that can execute speed to power moves.

    Length: Having a mature upper body that involves long arms, a compact torso, but slender legs, Ossai has the dimensions necessary to become a contributor early on, but needs to gain mass in his lower extremities. The lack of mass in his lower half shows up as a run defender, as he can struggle to hold down and maintain his ground when blockers attack his body head-on. Keeping his outside shoulder free was inconsistent and he often can become a gap shooter where his eagerness of wanting to make a high impact play can get the best of him.

    Hand Power: Ossai has well-developed hand strength and packs a powerful punch that jolts the heads of offensive tackles back. Needing to use it more successfully as a run defender, his firmness with his hands in order to maintain at the point of attack is still an area that needs to be developed, but the exact opposite is the case as a pass rusher. Although more reactionary, Ossaiís hands as a pass rusher are active, creative, and tough to contain off of initial punches from blockers. His aggressiveness and suddenness as a gap shooter while slanting as a run defender has enabled him to wreak havoc and finish with tackles for loss against the run.

    Run Defending: Ossai has the strength necessary to set a hard edge on the perimeter, but his consistency with identifying certain running concepts remains a work in progress. Seeing and feeling pullers, kick-out blocks, and detaching from them is an angle that he is inconsistent with. Because of the seesawing of time spent as a second level mixed with being an edge rusher, heís seen multiple viewpoints of run concepts, but settling into one spot may help his development moving forward.

    Effort/Motor: One of the better parts of Ossaiís game is his motor. He plays the game with a battery pack on, but the percentage levels of it hardly ever decrease through the duration of games. No matter the location of the ball, he feels as if he can have an impact on the play. Frequently able to make plays against the run while chasing from the backside, his pursuit to the ball is never ending. Ossai is a prospect that will hardly ever have concerns about his effort as heís displayed it at maximum levels despite the deficit on the scoreboard or points in the game.

    Football IQ: Ossaiís football smarts show up often as a pass rusher, but there are lots of improvements to be made as a run defender. Offenses placed him in predicaments with zone-read concepts and he was hot and cold with staying disciplined on his assignments of keeping contain of the quarterback. There are lots of other examples of where heís able to properly read and attack. After playing a mixture of off-ball linebacker and edge rusher prior to his junior season, he was able to settle into his comfort zone playing strictly off of the edge. Once he placed his sole emphasis on a single position, his football intelligence with seeing things from that lens began to grow significantly.

    Lateral Mobility: His ability to keep his shoulders square and play flat down the line as a run defender is often exemplified with runs opposite of him, as he contains the explosive juices necessary to move laterally down the line and make plays from a chasing position. Ossai possesses above-average range in which he can make plays outside of the tackle boxes or if well behind them initially. His hustle and willingness to get involved in plays oozes throughout him and are many examples of his endless competitiveness. Best suited as a 3-4 outside linebacker, his biggest challenges will come in coverage as he can be a bit of a wanderer when utilized as a spot dropper. Right now, Ossai doesnít have the flexibility and change of direction skills required to play man coverage, and his feel in zone coverage is not sufficient.

    Versatility: After spending time as both an off-ball linebacker and edge rusher during his first two seasons, Ossai was able to focus on being only an edge rusher during the 2020 season. With his mind not tasked with as many responsibilities, he was able to show off his vertically-attacking nature. With his better attribute being a pass rusher from a stand-up position, Ossai still has many strides to make in coverage. Even though he wasnít utilized frequently as a multiple position player in subpackages, his combination of twitch, power, and aggressiveness provides plenty of late down or obvious passing down situational versatility.

    SCOUT GRADES
    TDN Consensus: To Be Determined

    Jordan Reid: 83.5/100

  8. #98
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    Iowa
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    Farley
    PROSPECT SUMMARY - CALEB FARLEY
    Virginia Tech cornerback Caleb Farley enters the NFL after playing quarterback in high school, beginning his college career as a wide receiver, and then transitioning to defense where he shined as a cornerback for the Hokies in 2019. While he is new to the position, his film does not resemble a player that is still learning the ropes. Farley brings a rare blend of physical traits to the table in terms of size, length, quickness, fluidity, and athleticism that he pairs with exceptional man coverage skills that make him an exciting NFL prospect. Not only is he sticky in man coverage, Farley has game-changing ball skills and is an alpha in coverage. Unfortunately, his injury history is concerning. Farley suffered a non-contact ACL tear in 2017 that forced him to miss the season and then missed the last two games in 2019 due to back spasms, an issue Justin Fuente said Farley dealt with all season long. When it comes to on-the-field issues, Farley is a fairly complete prospect that is clearly ascending but sharpening his zone coverage skills would be beneficial. Additionally, he needs to develop his tackling technique to decrease an alarming amount of whiffs on tape. Farley has a full toolbox of traits to develop into a shutdown corner at the next level that can create takeaways.

    Ideal Role: Starting outside cornerback

    Scheme Fit: Schemes that feature large amounts of press and man coverage

    FILM EVALUATION
    Written by Joe Marino

    Games watched: Wake Forest (2019), Pittsburgh (2019), Notre Dame (2019), Miami (2019)

    Best Game Studied: Miami (2019)

    Worst Game Studied: Notre Dame (2019)

    Man Coverage Skills: Farley patiently mirrors routes and never panics. Heís sticky in man coverage as routes elongate and he has a natural feel for anticipating breaks, often finishing routes for receivers. He has the size, length, fluidity, quickness, speed, and pattern-matching skills to match up one on one with any receiver heís tasked with. In pressman, his physical traits and coverage ability enables him to quickly cap routes and take his receiver off the menu for the opposing quarterback. In 2019, the Hokies showed clear confidence in Farley given the amount of reps he was left on an island to defend his man with no assistance.

    Zone Coverage Skills: There are plenty of positive reps of zone coverage in Farleyís tape and his size, length, and foot speed are exceptional traits that project him favorably to zone duties in the NFL. With that said, there are times where he looks a touch unsure with spacing/layering and squeezing routes in zone. Given his limited experience playing corner, more confidence and consistency should come as he gains more reps.

    Ball Skills: Farley began his career at Virginia Tech playing receiver and itís easy to see why when he has chances to make plays on the football in coverage. The game slows down for him at the catch point. He has no issues tracking, adjusting, and invading the catch point with excellent technique. Farley does well to play through the hands of the receiver when heís tested.

    Tackling: Farley has the size and length needed to be an effective tackler, but those traits are not applied consistently when given opportunities to finish plays. There are times when it appears Farley lacks the enthusiasm needed to be a consistent tackler and there are too many missed attempts on his film. Farley must develop his tackling technique, become more willing, and improve his consistency.

    Versatility: Farley projects as an outside corner in the NFL and there isnít any appeal or reason to consider him in a slot role. There isnít a coverage technique that he lacks the desired physical traits to excel in but his best reps come in press-man and man coverage. With nine career attempts, Farley does have some experience as a returner and he was a high school quarterback that began his college career at wide receiver.

    Competitive Toughness: In coverage, Farley is an alpha. Heís assertive in press coverage, physical when mirroring routes, and invasive at the catch point. With that said, his temperament playing off blocks in pursuit and when opportunities are presented to tackle are often disappointing.

    Functional Athleticism: Farley features a rare blend of size and athleticism. Itís not often corners of his size are as loose, fluid, and quick as Farley is. He has exceptional long speed to stay connected as routes elongate and recover. His footwork is clean and his pedal is smooth, leading to easy transitions. His click-and-close ability is dynamic and his explosiveness shines when he flips his hips to turn and run.

    Football IQ: Farley played quarterback in high school and started his career at Virginia Tech as a wide receiver. With that in mind, his film does not resemble a player that is new to the position. His man coverage skills and route anticipation ability is outstanding. That said, he does have room to develop more confidence in zone coverage.

    Run Defending: Considering Farleyís size and physical gifts, he should be a much more effective run defender than he currently is. While there are positive moments playing off contact and finishing, the bad outweighs the good. Run defense is an area that Farley must improve on to reach his ceiling at the next level.

    Length: Farley has terrific length and he knows how to use it in coverage. He has the length and power in his hands to redirect receivers in press coverage and destroy the timing of the route. His length also shows up at the catch point with his ability to play through the hands of receivers and also increase his margin for error. Unfortunately, his length is not an asset playing off contact or tackling at this point like it should be.

    Prospect Comparison: Antonio Cromartie (2006 NFL Draft, San Diego Chargers)

    SCOUT GRADES
    TDN Consensus: To Be Determined

    Joe Marino: 87/100

  9. #99
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    May 2007
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    Land of the sun
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    Anybody else worried we've seen Bradbury's ceiling think he is what he's gunna be not very good. Read an article recently blamed coaching for why the offensive line is garbage?

  10. #100
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    Jun 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacofunk64 View Post
    That seems to be the consensus amongst a lot of mocks going right now. I would have no problem with that pick but it seems like we could probably trade down and still get him? I'm hoping Kwity Paye drops to us, god damn I would love that. Also a big fan of Slater from NW who can play tackle or guard.
    I think how high Rousseau gets drafted will depend on his combine performance. He opted out of the 2020 season. His 2019 film he looks long limbed and really athletic. If he tests really well heíll have a shot at going top 10.

    If we stay at 14, Slater is the OL I would take. Iíve read he can play guard too but it seems like a disservice to him to move him away from LT. Heís really good there. I donít want a G in the first. I read an article (might have been PFF) but it basically said the drop off between starting guards in the first 4 rounds is minimal. Basically saying you can find a starter anywhere. Hopefully this year the Vikings stop missing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    2020 Vikings Draft:
    1: Justin Jefferson WR LSU
    1: Jeff Gladney CB TCU
    2: Ezra Cleveland OT Boise State
    3: Cameron Dantzler CB Mississippi State
    4: D.J. Wonnum DE South Carolina
    4: James Lynch DT Baylor
    4: Troy Dye LB Oregon
    5: Harrison Hand CB Temple
    5: K.J. Osborn WR Miami
    6: Blake Brandel OT Oregon State
    6: Josh Metellus S Michigan
    7: Kenny Willekes DE Michigan State
    7: Nate Stanley QB Iowa
    7: Brian Cole S Mississippi State
    7: Kyle Hinton G Washburn

  11. #101
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    Aug 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimgim View Post
    Anybody else worried we've seen Bradbury's ceiling think he is what he's gunna be not very good. Read an article recently blamed coaching for why the offensive line is garbage?
    No I don't think he's reached his ceiling. The one thing that is lacking is his anchor which I was told on Twitter is him just working on technique. First half of the season he played pretty well in terms of pressures given up but the second half he played poorly. For a while he was around the top 10 centers according to PFF. I think he needs to add lower trunk strength as well so hopefully another offseason of training will help.

    I also think part of the problem is our zone blocking scheme which looks for more athletic types to be able to move in space. Which is why our guys seem to be much better with the run blocking. We need to find an inbetween here because it isn't working lol. Get me a guy like Deonte Brown who isn't the most physically gifted and doesn't necessarily feet a zone scheme but he will bring some dawg and nastiness that won't be easily bull rushed.

  12. #102
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    Aug 2007
    Location
    Iowa
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikingsfan0845 View Post
    I think how high Rousseau gets drafted will depend on his combine performance. He opted out of the 2020 season. His 2019 film he looks long limbed and really athletic. If he tests really well heíll have a shot at going top 10.

    If we stay at 14, Slater is the OL I would take. Iíve read he can play guard too but it seems like a disservice to him to move him away from LT. Heís really good there. I donít want a G in the first. I read an article (might have been PFF) but it basically said the drop off between starting guards in the first 4 rounds is minimal. Basically saying you can find a starter anywhere. Hopefully this year the Vikings stop missing.


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    Ya I get that but my concern is I think he would be better than Cleveland as a guard. I don't think Cleveland has the strength to be successful inside but would do well outside. Regardless, we will have plenty of options at 14 and I think trading down is a real possibility unless someone we thought would go top 10. Very possible, especially if 4 QB's go top 10. I think Lawrence, Fields & Wilson for sure go top 10 and then someone may trade up to get Lance.

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