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  1. #106
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    forget the $8m, Stilla talked about Frank not being worth even his 6m option. I think you have to be REALLY low on a guy to not pick up a rookie option. As much as I was down on DSJR for instance, it was a no brainer to pick up his option.

  2. #107
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    All you need to know about Dennis Smith Jr, in the Knicks 119-122 loss to the Wizards (before the pandemic shutdown), Coach Miller chose not to give him any minutes. Basically a healthy scratch.

    Smith Jr and Randle's stock were so low that Perry basically had to add a first rounder just to entertain the idea to move them in order to get Monk and Rozier. Basically, the Hornets weren't going to take Randle's contract w/o compensation.

    The Knicks are basically trying to lure Giannis, hoping AD will opt out and join him. Will it happen? Dunno.

  3. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeartOfStarks View Post
    I mean you’re all over the place. Yes you’re basically saying you don’t want him. Someone will sign him for 8 million. He’s 21 years old and an elite defender.

    What contract would you give him? 2 years 7 million? He’s not a keeper to you and that’s fine. I disagree but you clearly do not value him then simultaneously say “I like him.” You don’t really like him as a player though clearly.
    clearly you know me lol, you know how I feel, not sure how that's possible? And for the record Frank cannot be extended for less than his contract so that is why you wait?

    You didn't answer the question you said you would sign Frank for the right contract, what is that exactly? And when would you do it?

    I'm not even sure anymore of your agenda.........because I don't want to extend Frank right now this second I don't want Frank and don't like him as a player? your warped on this kind of mentality to be perfectly fair.

    I like Lin, but not at what he signed for........and after he got the contract he failed. You can like a player yet also give him a contract based on reality.

    I like Tobias a lot but not at Max, I watched him grow through so many stages, would love him on the Knicks but don't think he's a Max player,

    this making sense to you? So please don't tell me how a feel about a player, BB is a business as much as pleasure to us fans, and Frank is not worth right now this second, today, 8.5m?

    So I'll ask again and don't make it about me, what would you pay Frank, when would you extend him, and how many years?

  4. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    forget the $8m, Stilla talked about Frank not being worth even his 6m option. I think you have to be REALLY low on a guy to not pick up a rookie option. As much as I was down on DSJR for instance, it was a no brainer to pick up his option.
    so reality, 2015 draft because we are talking about Frank in 2021 getting his QO or extended.

    Picks 3, 5, 6, 7 ,8, 9 all did not get extended..........we are no longer talking about picking up options, we are talking extensions, extending players is not by any means a no brainer, correct?

    You have Frank signed and extended already, and not even letting him step on the court when he's locked in next year and you have his QO to match any offer the following, how stupid it would be to extend him.

    If Frank exceeds all expectations I'm sure the Knicks will gladly pay the extra couple mil to lock him up, but if he remains the same, how smart you don't have a contract on the books to worry about.

    This is about being a GM, not a coach, and very much not a fan, it's when now to extend Frank, and now is not the time that would be one dumb Front office move.

    Like giving a guy locked up for under 1.8m for next two years 20 mil now? didn't you say that? No you don't do that as a FO person.

    How come no one says I clearly don't like Mitch lol...........I was his first big time fan, still am but you don't pay him that kind of money when you have him locked up for nothing for two years.

  5. #110
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    Elfrid Payton- Part 10 of a series analyzing the New York Knicks


    Knicks point guard Elfrid Payton is back in his hometown of New Orleans, doing lots of running to keep in shape during the coronavirus pandemic.

    Payton is running the flat terrain of the Big Easy every morning, running as well as he ran the Knicks in his 45 games in orange-and-blue this season.

    When the 6-foot-3 Payton wasn’t injured, he was the Knicks’ starting point guard, posting some real strong performances in victories with his penetration, dishes and steals.

    With his deceivingly solid season, Payton became general manager Scott Perry’s best free-agent signing — a one-year, $8 million deal with a team option for 2021-22. Perry was instrumental in bringing Payton to Orlando in a draft-night trade after the 76ers made Payton a lottery pick in 2014.

    “I just feel the team has been a noticeably better basketball team with him healthy,’’ one NBA source connected to the Knicks said. “He was out during that awful stretch. He just brings us defensive tenacity, a pace to the offense and a veteran craftiness to the team.’’

    Former coach David Fizdale will always wonder “what if” Payton had not strained his hamstring in the season’s fourth game. Payton missed the next 17 games and made a rusty return in a Denver rout on Dec. 5.

    Fizdale got whacked the next day with the Knicks at 4-18. Knicks owner James Dolan completely discounted Payton’s absence.

    Interim coach Mike Miller reaped the Payton benefits. The Knicks’ offensive rating with Payton on the floor is 110.7 (15th in the league). Without Payton, the rating is 103.4 — which would make them dead last.

    The Payton Effect only grew stronger as the season wore on. Since February, Payton averaged 12.3 points, 8.8 assists and 5.4 rebounds in 14 games in which the Knicks were 7-7. He even posted a triple-double.

    And yet there is no assurance new president Leon Rose will exercise an $8 million team option. That Payton is a Creative Artists Agency client, whose primary agent is Aaron Mintz, doesn’t hurt. Rose ran CAA’s basketball department until joining the Knicks last month. Payton’s only 26.

    Even with youngsters Frank Ntilikina and Dennis Smith Jr. locked up for next season, the Knicks have their sights set on adding a point guard in the draft or free agency. One of the top candidates in free agency is Toronto’s grinder Fred VanVleet, an NBA champion out of Wichita State.

    While Payton may be among the game’s most underrated point guards, his glaring weakness — 3–point shooting — can’t be ignored. Payton shot a miserable 20.3 percent this season and is 28 percent for his career.

    “I like Payton, but I didn’t like his reluctance to better his shot at the start of his career,’’ said ex-Knick and longtime Raptors broadcaster Leo Rautins. “That set him back. The big difference between him and Fred is Fred came into a winning environment and had to fight.

    “Payton entered the league a high pick, was not held accountable, and to some degree, felt entitled. Plus, playing on struggling teams and for several coaches stunted his growth. I still feel if he wants it bad enough, in the right environment, he can be a solid point off the bench for a good team.’’

    Payton’s ability to penetrate at will had Miller steadfast about starting him. Miller cherishes point guards who can touch the paint and Payton continued his solid chemistry with former Pelicans teammate Julius Randle.

    With Payton on the court, 55.6 percent of the Knicks shots came in the paint. That’s highest ratio in the league. With Payton on the sidelines, just 43.7 percent of their points came in the paint.

    If Payton didn’t get hurt, Fizdale may still be employed.

  6. #111
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    Bobby Portis- Part 11 of a series analyzing the New York Knicks


    Knicks power forward Bobby Portis got judged more for his contract than his contribution.

    Taking advantage of the Knicks striking out on stars in free agency, Portis landed a whopping two-year, $30.7 million pact to be their backup power forward.

    There was no way Portis could live up to that money. But the 25-year-old put together some massive games — including single-handedly beating his former club, the Bulls, with 28 points in 30 minutes in a contest MSG Network replayed Tuesday night.

    Portis, quarantining in his home state of Arkansas, made $15 million this season and a $15.7 million team option exists for next season.

    “At the time of the signing it was a little high, but they got an option,’’ one NBA personnel director told The Post. “So to get that they had to pay the premium, but I can’t imagine they can keep him.”
    Enlarge ImageBobby PortisBobby PortisNBAE via Getty Images
    Selected by Chicago with the 22nd pick in the 2015 draft, Portis is expected to become a free agent and probably is worth the midlevel exception that stood at $9.2 million last summer, according to NBA talent evaluators. With the coronavirus pandemic potentially canceling the season, there’s no telling what the midlevel will look like in 2020 free agency.

    “People look at him through a different — and sometimes unfair lens — but he stayed in his lane, knew his role and produced,’’ one talent evaluator said. “You can argue that after Marcus Morris, he was responsible for a lot of wins. And he bangs a little more than he gets credit for.’’

    Never known for his defense or ball sharing, Portis joined his third team in five months when he signed July 1 and was inconsistent up until the All-Star break.

    But over the last 11 games, Portis averaged 13.5 points on 52.6 percent shooting, including 41.4 percent (12 of 29) on 3-pointers. If the season is over, Portis would finish in double figures (10.1 points) on 45 percent shooting and become the only Knick to play in all 66 games.

    “Bobby was really terrific the last month heading into the shutdown,’’ his agent, Mark Bartelstein, told The Post. “He was getting comfortable with the guys he was playing with. He was trending toward a great finish to the season.

    “I think there was an adjustment period with a new team, the coaching change. There were a lot of things happening at the same time and that accounted for some rough spots.’’

    At 6-foot-10, Portis is the prototype stretch 4. He made 35.8 percent of his 3-pointers on the season. However, while one NBA personnel man praises his “perimeter skills’’ and rebounding, Portis’ defense is still a work in progress.

    “He struggles with team defense, isn’t a shot-blocker or rim protector and can struggle with mobile 4s and powerful low-post 5s,’’ the personnel man said. “And what is his position — 4 or 5?”

    The Knicks fielded calls about Portis at the Feb. 6 trade deadline. His gargantuan contract made a deal too arduous.

  7. #112
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    Julius Randle- Part 12 of a series analyzing the New York Knicks
    Power forward Julius Randle became the most polarizing Knicks player with the fans — and in the locker room.

    Randle’s traditional numbers are strong but bittersweet.

    If there are no more regular-season games due to the coronavirus pandemic, Randle will finish 32nd in the league in scoring (19.5), 14th in rebounding (9.7) while posting the 12th-highest total of double-doubles (30).

    Nevertheless, some Knicks, including rookie RJ Barrett, were frustrated by Randle’s penchant for not distributing the ball quickly enough and overdribbling, according to two sources familiar with the situation.

    Randle became less of a turnover machine in the final two months and became a little less clunky on the drive. Still, the on-court chemistry between Randle and Barrett, who is used to having the ball in his hands, bears major watching next season. For the most part, Barrett kept quiet about the Randle situation.

    “A lot of players felt like that with the exception of Elfrid Payton,’’ one NBA source told The Post.

    Randle was signed to a three-year, $63 million contract and the pressure of being the No. 1 guy was too much early on. He eventually ceded that designation to Marcus Morris after committing four-plus turnovers in eight of the first 12 games.

    “You can’t argue with his productivity,’’ an Eastern Conference personnel man told The Post. “But he was in the wrong role. He absolutely should not be your No. 1 or even No. 2 option, maybe not even No. 3 on a serious contender. He doesn’t have a good enough feel, [and is] much too ball-dominant. I don’t trust his decisions with the ball. As sixth man, he would fit perfectly because I don’t think he gives you much defensively either. That’s more in line with a sixth-man role.”
    The 25-year-old southpaw reflected on the difficultly of his adjustment to the Knicks amid the 21-45 campaign. His agent, Aaron Mintz, was often in his ear with encouragement, but Randle often talked about struggling to figure out the double- and triple-teams he had never faced before.

    According to The Athletic, Randle apologized to the club for not being a better on-court leader during a players-only meeting the morning former coach David Fizdale was fired.

    “Julius got paid to be the leader of the franchise, but Morris played like the leader of the franchise,’’ the NBA source said. “Fiz anointed Mo the leader early on. Maybe that fueled Julius to play like he did.’’

    After Morris was traded, Randle’s scoring responsibility rose, and he met the challenge. However, his 3-point shot never became reliable. Randle wound up regressing in that area, finishing at 27.7 percent before the season’s suspension.

    Randle’s shakiness from the perimeter prompted Fizdale to comment in a radio interview last week that the Knicks need more of a stretch-4 to start at power forward.

    Randle went out in style in Atlanta on March 11 — scoring 33 points and hitting three of six 3-pointers in a victory that could become the season finale. That marked his eighth 30-point outing of the season.
    “He’s played extremely hard, started to show he could make the passing play when doubled,’’ said another NBA scout. “Though his 3-point shooting dipped, he’s proved in the past he is capable of stretching his game and the defense. But he can be a ball-stopper.”

    The Post reported before the trade deadline the Knicks were open to moving Randle, whose third year is guaranteed at just $4 million. Subsequent reports stated Charlotte engaged with the Knicks about Randle for point guard Terry Rozier, a longtime target of Knicks GM Scott Perry.

    Whenever the offseason begins, that Charlotte scenario could always be revisited, though Randle may have an ally in new president/former agent Leon Rose (Randle is a Creative Artists Agency client).

    Randle, a former Lakers lottery pick, is just 25, but it should be noted he has played on a losing team for all his six seasons. Figuring out the Randle conundrum is one factor making Rose’s job so challenging.

  8. #113
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    Mitchell Robinson- Part 13 of a series analyzing the New York Knicks

    On Feb. 9 in Atlanta, Knicks center Mitchell Robinson discussed big man Clint Capela, who had just been introduced at a press conference as the newest member of the Hawks an hour before the Knicks tipped off at State Farm Arena.

    When Robinson was selected in the second round of the 2018 draft, former Knicks coach David Fizdale said Robinson had Capela potential. The comparisons have stuck, with Robinson showing a player doesn’t need a jump shot to be a force — even in the new NBA.

    “I don’t really watch him,’’ Robinson said of Capela. “We do the same thing. He’s all right, but I think I’m better on defense.’’

    Robinson, 22, who is averaging 2.2 blocked shots for his career, has never lacked for confidence. He also may not be wrong, with his rim protection becoming more spectacular as the season moved on.

    The numbers show he is already a larger force than Capela on offense around the rim.

    The Knicks returned to Atlanta on March 11 and Robinson may have finished out a record-setting season with perfection — 7 of 7 from the field for 16 points. It raised his field-goal percentage to 74.2 percent.

    If there are no more games this season because of the coronavirus pandemic, Robinson will break Wilt Chamberlain’s field goal percentage record of 72.7 — set in 1972-73 when the Knicks beat Chamberlain’s Lakers for their most recent championship.

    The consensus around the league is that, for all the negativity surrounding James Dolan’s franchise, the Knicks at least have cap space, all their draft picks and two definite building blocks in Robinson, a second-round pick, and 2019 No. 3-overall selection RJ Barrett. Robinson being passed over for the Rising Stars Challenge at this year’s All-Star Weekend could turn out to be the worst snub in that event’s history.

    “I think Mitchell can end up being one of the best centers over the next 10 years,’’ Fizdale said on the radio last month.

    The Knicks would never trade Robinson the way the Rockets dealt Capela. Robinson is leading the league in alley-oops by far. He has made 88 total in 100 attempts. The second-closest is, yes, Capela with 66.

    “Now Mitchell has to win,’’ Fizdale told The Post recently. “Capela has won a lot of games.’’

    Robinson, who has been holed up in his hometown of New Orleans, also has to develop a mid-range jumper. Before each game, Robinson was on the court with assistant coach Pat Sullivan, launching perimeter shots from all angles. He refused, however, to launch once tip-off occurred despite defenders laying off.

    That hasn’t prevented the Knicks from being a better club when Robinson is on the floor — and it’s not close. The Knicks’ net rating improves by 5.3 points per 100 possessions with Robinson on the court — improving both offensively and defensively.

    Interim coach Mike Miller didn’t want to mess with a role at which Robinson became comfortable. Hence, Miller kept him as a reserve despite temptations to move him into the starting lineup when the 7-foot center’s game took off from February on.

    The advanced metrics are superb. Robinson ranks 16th in the NBA in Player Efficiency Rating, which sums up a player’s positive accomplishments and subtracts negative accomplishments to offer a per-minute performance evaluation.

    While he only took three jump shots this season, Robinson led the NBA for bench players in offensive rebounds (3.0 per game). He also rebounded 31 percent of the team’s missed shots at the rim when on the court (13th best in the NBA).

    “I think he’s going to have a great NBA career,’’ former Knicks coach Rick Pitino told The Post’s Steve Serby in a recent Q & A. “I’ve watched him play about five games, I don’t know his attitude, I don’t know his work ethic, but his ability is there, and I like what I see.”

    The only confounding stat is that Robinson is on his fifth agent — possibly an NBA record for a second-year player.

    In February, Robinson fired his young rep, Mayar Zokaei, and hired LeBron James’ and Anthony Davis’ superagent, Rich Paul.

    Robinson, however, is locked in for the next two years at a $1.6 million for 2020-21 and $1.8 million for 2021-22 — a team option. It’s unclear what Paul can do about it.

    For a guy who will become the first NBA player to average 2-plus blocks and shoot 60 percent in each of his first two seasons, it’s probably the league’s most team-friendly contract.

  9. #114
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    Dennis Smith-Part 14 of a series analyzing the New York Knicks

    Point guard Dennis Smith Jr. helped get former Knicks president Steve Mills fired.

    It was bad enough Mills failed to use the Knicks’ league-high cap space appropriately following the Kristaps Porzingis blockbuster trade 14 months ago.

    Adding insult to injury was that Smith, the Knicks’ prized athletic acquisition from the Mavericks, laid an egg in 2019-20. The Porzingis trade was Mills’ undoing, according to multiple sources.

    Everything that could have gone wrong for the 22-year-old Smith in his first full season in New York did go wrong. Smith hurt his back in training camp, then lost his stepmother in October, which led to a two-week family leave.

    He never could regain a rhythm or get enough playing time, battling for minutes with Elfrid Payton and Frank Ntilikina.

    Smith’s offseason jump-shot clinics with assistant Keith Smart didn’t pay dividends and he became prone to turnovers.

    When Smart got fired along with Fizdale in December, according to a source, it was a big blow to Smith. Fizdale and Smart were key allies.

    Smith went on to suffer an obscure oblique injury around Christmas that cost him 13 games. In late February, Smith sustained a concussion, forcing him out another five contests.

    Upon his return to the active roster, interim coach Mike Miller kept him on the bench for two straight games to close out the season so far. It was an unmitigated disaster.

    Now he’s back in North Carolina, having just donated food vouchers and computers to his hometown of Fayetteville during the coronavirus pandemic. No doubt he’s wondering what his Knicks future holds.

    “In short, Dennis is gifted but clueless,’’ one Western Conference personnel man told The Post. “ He’s supremely athletic and can be a gifted scorer as an attack-style ballhandler. But he’s an average shooter and non-passer. And doesn’t have a clue how to make others better. Plus he’s an indifferent defender, meaning when the mood strikes him.’’

    If the regular season is over, Smith will finish ranked 483th out of 503 players in real-plus minus (minus-2.54) — considered a more accurate barometer than standard plus-minus. In 34 games, Smith shot 34.1 percent — 29.6 from 3.

    New president Leon Rose has no political attachment to Smith like Mills did. Trading Smith will be an option in the offseason as the Knicks try to figure out their point-guard solution.

    Minnesota had some interest, but the additions of D’Angelo Russell and combo guard Malik Beasley make the Timberwolves less likely to pounce. The Magic could be a suitor.

    Some NBA sources believe Smith, with his age and seemingly unlucky journey in New York, could be a good risk in “the second draft.” That is first-round picks still on their rookie contracts who need a change of scenery.

    Smith, selected ninth by Dallas in 2017, had his $5.7 million fourth-year option picked up by Mills in October, though that looks like a mistake now.

    “He thinks too much about his shot and trying to score the ball,’’ another NBA scout said. “He needs to be more of lead pass-first guard and score second. Dennis also need a coach who shows him love and gives him confidence. The quickness and ability to dribble drive is always there but he wants to always be the highlight play with traffic dunks.”

    Still, there is potential to reverse the narrative. He has played just 156 career games in three seasons. One positive to hold on to is that after the Porzingis trade, Smith averaged 14.7 points and 5.4 assists in 21 games (18 starts) in 2018-19.

    “Right now there looks to be a lack of ability to run a team,’’ the NBA scout said. “But he’s got the ability if he would accept his role, to learn to be a pass-first point guard and don’t worry about buckets.”

  10. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by still a fan View Post
    clearly you know me lol, you know how I feel, not sure how that's possible? And for the record Frank cannot be extended for less than his contract so that is why you wait?

    You didn't answer the question you said you would sign Frank for the right contract, what is that exactly? And when would you do it?

    I'm not even sure anymore of your agenda.........because I don't want to extend Frank right now this second I don't want Frank and don't like him as a player? your warped on this kind of mentality to be perfectly fair.

    I like Lin, but not at what he signed for........and after he got the contract he failed. You can like a player yet also give him a contract based on reality.

    I like Tobias a lot but not at Max, I watched him grow through so many stages, would love him on the Knicks but don't think he's a Max player,

    this making sense to you? So please don't tell me how a feel about a player, BB is a business as much as pleasure to us fans, and Frank is not worth right now this second, today, 8.5m?

    So I'll ask again and don't make it about me, what would you pay Frank, when would you extend him, and how many years?
    Ok you took that pretty personally and I was really just referencing your posts on Frank. So let’s keep it there as that’s all I care to discuss here.

    Contracts aren’t always given based on what a player is worth today. Part of a good front office’s job is projecting player value over the coming seasons. Do I think Frank is worth a 3 year $25 million contract. Absolutely. Many fans (perhaps you included) disregard net rating, plus/minus or on/off splits. I don’t. I’ve said from day 1 and still believe today he’s a player who helps a team win. I stand by that now.

    It’s strange you’re saying I won’t answer a question but there it is, I believe I answered it. If I understand you correctly your answer is don’t sign him now, wait another season but also trade him if possible. Again that’s fine and if I’m misunderstanding you please correct me.

  11. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by still a fan View Post
    Dennis Smith-Part 14 of a series analyzing the New York Knicks
    I tried to get on the DSJR bandwagon but I just never could see it with him.

    even when Lebron was saying we should have drafted him 2 years ago, and when people suggested we trade Frank for DSJR, I always said Frank was going to be more of an impact player.

  12. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by still a fan View Post
    so reality, 2015 draft because we are talking about Frank in 2021 getting his QO or extended.

    Picks 3, 5, 6, 7 ,8, 9 all did not get extended..........we are no longer talking about picking up options, we are talking extensions, extending players is not by any means a no brainer, correct?

    You have Frank signed and extended already, and not even letting him step on the court when he's locked in next year and you have his QO to match any offer the following, how stupid it would be to extend him.

    If Frank exceeds all expectations I'm sure the Knicks will gladly pay the extra couple mil to lock him up, but if he remains the same, how smart you don't have a contract on the books to worry about.


    This is about being a GM, not a coach, and very much not a fan, it's when now to extend Frank, and now is not the time that would be one dumb Front office move.

    Like giving a guy locked up for under 1.8m for next two years 20 mil now? didn't you say that? No you don't do that as a FO person.

    How come no one says I clearly don't like Mitch lol...........I was his first big time fan, still am but you don't pay him that kind of money when you have him locked up for nothing for two years.
    why would we worry about a 3/25m type deal? He's well worth that now, this isn't DSJR we're talking about. no one is suggesting maxing the kid, the idea is you lock him up now at a reasonable rate, because even if he doesn't really break out but just improves again a bit more he could be looking at a Harkless type contract. but if he breaks out then you're probably talking about a Smart type contract.

    but again you're just way under valuing him, you don't even think he was worth the $6m option, heck you've said we can replace Frank with a vet min guy numerous times.

  13. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeartOfStarks View Post
    Ok you took that pretty personally and I was really just referencing your posts on Frank. So let’s keep it there as that’s all I care to discuss here.

    Contracts aren’t always given based on what a player is worth today. Part of a good front office’s job is projecting player value over the coming seasons. Do I think Frank is worth a 3 year $25 million contract. Absolutely. Many fans (perhaps you included) disregard net rating, plus/minus or on/off splits. I don’t. I’ve said from day 1 and still believe today he’s a player who helps a team win. I stand by that now.

    It’s strange you’re saying I won’t answer a question but there it is, I believe I answered it. If I understand you correctly your answer is don’t sign him now, wait another season but also trade him if possible. Again that’s fine and if I’m misunderstanding you please correct me.
    yes i'll correct you, my answer is the same for Mitch who just may be my favorite player right now, you have them locked up you don't need to rush, why sign him now, what changes if you wait part or even all of next season? The quick answer is Nothing......you still have his QO, hence why they have QO for Rookie contracts to protect the team, so NBA gives you something and you don't use it? Like the Houston rule and Dolan don't use it, not smart was that?
    Trade him? I said for the right deal if he needs to be included, absolutely......what Knick fan wouldn't? Only Frank fans, not Knick fans, correct?

    Okay I posted many more, enough with Frank it's redundant and I don't think anyone is willing to truly read how I feel, just same old interpretations.....I'm a Knick fan first, players are secondary to the team.

  14. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    why would we worry about a 3/25m type deal? He's well worth that now, this isn't DSJR we're talking about. no one is suggesting maxing the kid, the idea is you lock him up now at a reasonable rate, because even if he doesn't really break out but just improves again a bit more he could be looking at a Harkless type contract. but if he breaks out then you're probably talking about a Smart type contract.

    but again you're just way under valuing him, you don't even think he was worth the $6m option, heck you've said we can replace Frank with a vet min guy numerous times.
    Actually you are over valuing him because he's locked up and we can match any offer or even do a S&T if needed.
    No at some point you be a business man and see how Frank performs you have all year, and to repeat if he excels fantastic you pay him, chances are not exactly high he will outperform his 8.5 QO, so yes you take the business aspect and wait, not the fan aspect and lock him up for over 8.5m and think that's a great deal, then if he's not you can't move him for nothing.
    You act like 8.5 is nothing.........it is something, especially if he remains the same and you can sign him for say 3-4 mil and lock him up. Then if he is a late bloomer you have a steal.

    sorry lets just agree to disagree, I have to put my business hat on, we have him locked up and we have the advantage, you want to give that up.

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    15 part series - Analyzing Present-Future of each Knick- Mark Hale, Marc Berman

    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    I tried to get on the DSJR bandwagon but I just never could see it with him.

    even when Lebron was saying we should have drafted him 2 years ago, and when people suggested we trade Frank for DSJR, I always said Frank was going to be more of an impact player.
    Both guys are mentally flawed. DSJ plays like he doesn’t care most of the time and Frank plays like he feels he doesn’t belong most of the time. DSJ is a total lost cause. On the other hand, I think Frank can get much better with just a couple little adjustments. start to rebound and look to receive outlets passes. push the ball like Green down the middle of the court without picking it up or stopping forward progress unless it is a throw ahead or the defense has reacted. Aggressively look to get the ball below the 3 point line while pushing it north/south. Thats it. Now his passing and size becomes an asset. he could often have value as this secondary pace making ball handler. It’s not a big ask but 3 years of watching him mince around the court on offense certainly gives me doubt.


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    Last edited by ewing; 04-05-2020 at 02:37 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raps08-09 Champ View Post
    My dick is named 'Ewing'.

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