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  1. #1531
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    Yanks Guy u are correct my error. I just remember that their was talk of making sure Cole was lined up for the home opener

  2. #1532
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny ny View Post
    they should just cancel the season. what happens if players on multiple teams get the virus then what...what if 20 players on a team get the virus.. there is just now way they can safely play this season...
    If the entire Yankee roster has it it would be a major home field advantage. So much so that the other teams wouldn't want to play so they forfeit. Yankees 2020 WS Champs by default. Parade!

  3. #1533
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    Quote Originally Posted by dayners81 View Post
    Yanks Guy u are correct my error. I just remember that their was talk of making sure Cole was lined up for the home opener

    Yes...SET HIM UP to pitch the home opener, not hold him out til then. That sounds more reasonable. But as things are, it doesn't much matter now. I just hope we get to see some baseball and I don't care who's pitching. Just give me some Yankee baseball.
    The REAL DEAL Yankee fan

  4. #1534
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    Quote Originally Posted by YANKSGUY View Post
    Yes...SET HIM UP to pitch the home opener, not hold him out til then. That sounds more reasonable. But as things are, it doesn't much matter now. I just hope we get to see some baseball and I don't care who's pitching. Just give me some Yankee baseball.
    I'd even settle, tempoarily of course, just to find something BB related to talk about. Something like when there is a trade deadline who do we think/ hope that the Yanks target as an upgrade. I'd like to see if they could pull of a deal for Jon Gray. 3/5ths of our rotation is set to become FA after this yr and Sevy's not going to be back till mid 21 so were probably going to need another starter anyways. Gray has absolutely incredible stuff and he's an absolutely prime candidate for a change in scenery

  5. #1535
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    So desperate for sports, I'm dreaming of some baseball....

    Projected...

    2B: DJ Lemahieu
    RF: A. Judge
    SS: G. Torres
    DH: G. Stanton
    C: G. Sanchez
    1B: Voit
    3B: M. Andujar
    CF: A. Hicks
    LF: C. Frazier

    I prefer this line up:

    2B: DJ Lemehieu
    CF: A. Hicks
    RF: A. Judge
    SS: G. Torres
    DH: Rotation Stanton-Judge-Gardner
    C: G. Sanchez
    1B: L. Voit
    3B: M. Andujar/G. Urshala
    LF: C. Frazier

  6. #1536
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    3B according to Boone and Cashman is Urshelas to lose. Gardy will be in CF till Hicks gets back then in LF. I would also count on seeing Andujar rotate quite a bit between LF, 3B and DH. I will be very shocked if Frazier makes the team especially if Hicks, Judge and Stanton are all healthy to start the season. Talkman will be the 4th ofer because of his elite defense at all 3 OF position where Frazier can really only play LF, he was a nightmare in RF last yr

  7. #1537
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    Starting rotation rankings for all 30 teams. They have the Yanks ranked 2nd even without Sevy, gotta imagine they would have been the clear #1 had he been healthy https://bleacherreport.com/articles/...otation#slide8

  8. #1538
    OhSoSlick's Avatar
    OhSoSlick is offline Formerly RCSownsU - PSDs Sexiest Fireman
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    Sources: MLB, union focused on plan that could allow season to start as early as May in Arizona

    Major League baseball and its players are increasingly focused on a plan that could allow them to start the season as early as May and has the support of high-ranking federal public health officials who believe the league can safely operate amid the coronavirus pandemic, sources told ESPN.
    Though the plan has a number of potential stumbling blocks, it has emerged above other options as the likeliest to work and has been embraced by MLB and MLB Players Association leadership, who are buoyed by the possibility of baseball's return and the backing of federal officials, sources said.


    The plan, sources said, would dictate all 30 teams play games at stadiums with no fans in the greater Phoenix area, including the*Arizona Diamondbacks' Chase Field, 10 spring training facilities and perhaps other nearby fields. Players, coaching staffs and other essential personnel would be sequestered at local hotels, where they would live in relative isolation, and travel only to the stadium and back, sources said. Federal officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Health have been supportive of a plan that would adhere to strict isolation, promote social distancing and allow MLB to become the first professional sport to return.

    The May return date depends on a number of concerns being allayed, and some officials believe a June opening day could be more realistic, sources said. Most important would be a significant increase in available coronavirus tests with a quick turnaround time, which sources familiar with the plan believe will happen by early May and allow MLB's testing not to diminish access for the general public.

    While health officials see MLB players as low-risk candidates for COVID-19-related issues because of their age and health, putting protocols in place to ensure the health and safety of older managers, coaches, umpires and other personnel would be paramount to the plan working, sources said.

    The logistics to pull off such a plan would be enormous and cumbersome on the league side and require the buy-in of players, who sources expect to be skeptical of separating from their families for an indefinite amount of time - perhaps as long as 4½ months, if the inability to stem the coronavirus outbreak keeps teams from playing in their home stadiums in 2020.

    Still, there is hope among leadership on both sides that the combination of receiving paychecks for playing and baseball's return offering a respite to a nation beset by the devastation of COVID-19 would convince players to agree to the plan, sources said.

    For weeks, top federal health officials and officials at the league have discussed the feasibility of the plan, sources said. On Saturday, top officials with the MLBPA spoke with health officials who offered the plan as the clearest way for baseball to restart, according to sources. The league and union began discussing the plan multiple in phone calls Monday, sources said. With the uncertainty of how long the coronavirus pandemic will affect the United States, the isolation option leapt to the forefront of the possibilities the league was considering, sources said.
    The hurdles go far beyond testing and players' fears of separating from their families. MLB and the MLBPA, sources said, expect to discuss this week the economics of the plan, in which the league would forgo the gate receipts that account for the largest proportion of its annual revenues that exceed $10 billion. The league could reap additional money by adding games to its national television portfolio, with networks likely to leap at live programming as other sports remain shuttered due to the coronavirus, sources said.

    Should the league and union agree to a deal, sources said, it would strongly increase the possibility that teams descend on the Phoenix area in May, provided the logistical issues - securing robust coronavirus testing, lodging, security, transportation and myriad other matters - can be solved. After a two- to three-week training camp, during which the protocols would be tested and iterated, MLB could consider beginning its regular season, sources said.

    While the possibility of a player or staff member testing positive for coronavirus exists, even in a secured setting, officials do not believe that a positive alone would necessarily be cause to quarantine an entire team or shut down the season, sources said. The plan could include teams carrying significantly expanded rosters to account for the possibility of players testing positive despite the isolation as well as to counteract the heat in Phoenix, which could grow problematic during the summer, sources said. The allure of more players potentially receiving major league salaries and service time would appeal strongly to the union, according to sources.

    Both sides acknowledge the uniqueness of the season would not be limited to stadium location or roster size. Among the possibilities that have been discussed among people from both sides, though not in the talks Monday, according to sources:
    • Implementing an electronic strike zone to allow the home-plate umpire to maintain sufficient distance from the catcher and batter

    • No mound visits from the catcher or pitching coach
    • Seven-inning doubleheaders, which, with an earlier-than-expected start date, could allow baseball to come closer to a full 162-game season
    • Regular use of on-field microphones by players, as an added bonus for TV viewers
    • Sitting in the empty stands 6 feet apart - the recommended social-distancing space - instead of in a dugout

    Each option, though far from certain, is likely to be bandied about in the coming days as the viability of the plan for everyone involved takes shape.

    The money discussion would not just be between the league and players but among the teams, too. Because local television contracts vary significantly by market - well over $100 million a year separate the top and bottom local TV deals - those reliant on gate revenues could seek a one-year change to the revenue-sharing plan among the 30 teams.

    The sides also would need to determine how many people would live inside the sport's so-called bubble alongside on-field and medical personnel and whether it would include front-office officials, scouts, video personnel and media, among others, sources said.

    As consequential and potentially tricky as some of the challenges may be, sources said the league and union are motivated to make the plan work because they realize the alternative may be worse for both sides: No baseball at all in 2020.

    http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/2...-early-arizona
    via @ESPN App http://espn.com/app


    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
    Last edited by OhSoSlick; 04-07-2020 at 12:37 AM.
    He is talking about the one and only, pure trash: Ereck Flowers

    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyskilla View Post
    His stern face can give that impression but I don't feel that's the case. New York isn't an easy place to play at, so honestly I can see his confidence at an all-time low for him.

    I don't think he's a bust. I think he just needs the right motivation to pick himself up & play harder.

  9. #1539
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    5,155
    Quote Originally Posted by RCSownsU View Post
    Sources: MLB, union focused on plan that could allow season to start as early as May in Arizona

    Major League baseball and its players are increasingly focused on a plan that could allow them to start the season as early as May and has the support of high-ranking federal public health officials who believe the league can safely operate amid the coronavirus pandemic, sources told ESPN.
    Though the plan has a number of potential stumbling blocks, it has emerged above other options as the likeliest to work and has been embraced by MLB and MLB Players Association leadership, who are buoyed by the possibility of baseball's return and the backing of federal officials, sources said.


    The plan, sources said, would dictate all 30 teams play games at stadiums with no fans in the greater Phoenix area, including the*Arizona Diamondbacks' Chase Field, 10 spring training facilities and perhaps other nearby fields. Players, coaching staffs and other essential personnel would be sequestered at local hotels, where they would live in relative isolation, and travel only to the stadium and back, sources said. Federal officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Health have been supportive of a plan that would adhere to strict isolation, promote social distancing and allow MLB to become the first professional sport to return.

    The May return date depends on a number of concerns being allayed, and some officials believe a June opening day could be more realistic, sources said. Most important would be a significant increase in available coronavirus tests with a quick turnaround time, which sources familiar with the plan believe will happen by early May and allow MLB's testing not to diminish access for the general public.

    While health officials see MLB players as low-risk candidates for COVID-19-related issues because of their age and health, putting protocols in place to ensure the health and safety of older managers, coaches, umpires and other personnel would be paramount to the plan working, sources said.

    The logistics to pull off such a plan would be enormous and cumbersome on the league side and require the buy-in of players, who sources expect to be skeptical of separating from their families for an indefinite amount of time - perhaps as long as 4½ months, if the inability to stem the coronavirus outbreak keeps teams from playing in their home stadiums in 2020.

    Still, there is hope among leadership on both sides that the combination of receiving paychecks for playing and baseball's return offering a respite to a nation beset by the devastation of COVID-19 would convince players to agree to the plan, sources said.

    For weeks, top federal health officials and officials at the league have discussed the feasibility of the plan, sources said. On Saturday, top officials with the MLBPA spoke with health officials who offered the plan as the clearest way for baseball to restart, according to sources. The league and union began discussing the plan multiple in phone calls Monday, sources said. With the uncertainty of how long the coronavirus pandemic will affect the United States, the isolation option leapt to the forefront of the possibilities the league was considering, sources said.
    The hurdles go far beyond testing and players' fears of separating from their families. MLB and the MLBPA, sources said, expect to discuss this week the economics of the plan, in which the league would forgo the gate receipts that account for the largest proportion of its annual revenues that exceed $10 billion. The league could reap additional money by adding games to its national television portfolio, with networks likely to leap at live programming as other sports remain shuttered due to the coronavirus, sources said.

    Should the league and union agree to a deal, sources said, it would strongly increase the possibility that teams descend on the Phoenix area in May, provided the logistical issues - securing robust coronavirus testing, lodging, security, transportation and myriad other matters - can be solved. After a two- to three-week training camp, during which the protocols would be tested and iterated, MLB could consider beginning its regular season, sources said.

    While the possibility of a player or staff member testing positive for coronavirus exists, even in a secured setting, officials do not believe that a positive alone would necessarily be cause to quarantine an entire team or shut down the season, sources said. The plan could include teams carrying significantly expanded rosters to account for the possibility of players testing positive despite the isolation as well as to counteract the heat in Phoenix, which could grow problematic during the summer, sources said. The allure of more players potentially receiving major league salaries and service time would appeal strongly to the union, according to sources.

    Both sides acknowledge the uniqueness of the season would not be limited to stadium location or roster size. Among the possibilities that have been discussed among people from both sides, though not in the talks Monday, according to sources:
    • Implementing an electronic strike zone to allow the home-plate umpire to maintain sufficient distance from the catcher and batter

    • No mound visits from the catcher or pitching coach
    • Seven-inning doubleheaders, which, with an earlier-than-expected start date, could allow baseball to come closer to a full 162-game season
    • Regular use of on-field microphones by players, as an added bonus for TV viewers
    • Sitting in the empty stands 6 feet apart - the recommended social-distancing space - instead of in a dugout

    Each option, though far from certain, is likely to be bandied about in the coming days as the viability of the plan for everyone involved takes shape.

    The money discussion would not just be between the league and players but among the teams, too. Because local television contracts vary significantly by market - well over $100 million a year separate the top and bottom local TV deals - those reliant on gate revenues could seek a one-year change to the revenue-sharing plan among the 30 teams.

    The sides also would need to determine how many people would live inside the sport's so-called bubble alongside on-field and medical personnel and whether it would include front-office officials, scouts, video personnel and media, among others, sources said.

    As consequential and potentially tricky as some of the challenges may be, sources said the league and union are motivated to make the plan work because they realize the alternative may be worse for both sides: No baseball at all in 2020.

    http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/2...-early-arizona
    via @ESPN App http://espn.com/app


    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
    total absurdity...

  10. #1540
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCSownsU View Post
    Sources: MLB, union focused on plan that could allow season to start as early as May in Arizona

    Major League baseball and its players are increasingly focused on a plan that could allow them to start the season as early as May and has the support of high-ranking federal public health officials who believe the league can safely operate amid the coronavirus pandemic, sources told ESPN.
    Though the plan has a number of potential stumbling blocks, it has emerged above other options as the likeliest to work and has been embraced by MLB and MLB Players Association leadership, who are buoyed by the possibility of baseball's return and the backing of federal officials, sources said.


    The plan, sources said, would dictate all 30 teams play games at stadiums with no fans in the greater Phoenix area, including the*Arizona Diamondbacks' Chase Field, 10 spring training facilities and perhaps other nearby fields. Players, coaching staffs and other essential personnel would be sequestered at local hotels, where they would live in relative isolation, and travel only to the stadium and back, sources said. Federal officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Health have been supportive of a plan that would adhere to strict isolation, promote social distancing and allow MLB to become the first professional sport to return.

    The May return date depends on a number of concerns being allayed, and some officials believe a June opening day could be more realistic, sources said. Most important would be a significant increase in available coronavirus tests with a quick turnaround time, which sources familiar with the plan believe will happen by early May and allow MLB's testing not to diminish access for the general public.

    While health officials see MLB players as low-risk candidates for COVID-19-related issues because of their age and health, putting protocols in place to ensure the health and safety of older managers, coaches, umpires and other personnel would be paramount to the plan working, sources said.

    The logistics to pull off such a plan would be enormous and cumbersome on the league side and require the buy-in of players, who sources expect to be skeptical of separating from their families for an indefinite amount of time - perhaps as long as 4½ months, if the inability to stem the coronavirus outbreak keeps teams from playing in their home stadiums in 2020.

    Still, there is hope among leadership on both sides that the combination of receiving paychecks for playing and baseball's return offering a respite to a nation beset by the devastation of COVID-19 would convince players to agree to the plan, sources said.

    For weeks, top federal health officials and officials at the league have discussed the feasibility of the plan, sources said. On Saturday, top officials with the MLBPA spoke with health officials who offered the plan as the clearest way for baseball to restart, according to sources. The league and union began discussing the plan multiple in phone calls Monday, sources said. With the uncertainty of how long the coronavirus pandemic will affect the United States, the isolation option leapt to the forefront of the possibilities the league was considering, sources said.
    The hurdles go far beyond testing and players' fears of separating from their families. MLB and the MLBPA, sources said, expect to discuss this week the economics of the plan, in which the league would forgo the gate receipts that account for the largest proportion of its annual revenues that exceed $10 billion. The league could reap additional money by adding games to its national television portfolio, with networks likely to leap at live programming as other sports remain shuttered due to the coronavirus, sources said.

    Should the league and union agree to a deal, sources said, it would strongly increase the possibility that teams descend on the Phoenix area in May, provided the logistical issues - securing robust coronavirus testing, lodging, security, transportation and myriad other matters - can be solved. After a two- to three-week training camp, during which the protocols would be tested and iterated, MLB could consider beginning its regular season, sources said.

    While the possibility of a player or staff member testing positive for coronavirus exists, even in a secured setting, officials do not believe that a positive alone would necessarily be cause to quarantine an entire team or shut down the season, sources said. The plan could include teams carrying significantly expanded rosters to account for the possibility of players testing positive despite the isolation as well as to counteract the heat in Phoenix, which could grow problematic during the summer, sources said. The allure of more players potentially receiving major league salaries and service time would appeal strongly to the union, according to sources.

    Both sides acknowledge the uniqueness of the season would not be limited to stadium location or roster size. Among the possibilities that have been discussed among people from both sides, though not in the talks Monday, according to sources:
    • Implementing an electronic strike zone to allow the home-plate umpire to maintain sufficient distance from the catcher and batter

    • No mound visits from the catcher or pitching coach
    • Seven-inning doubleheaders, which, with an earlier-than-expected start date, could allow baseball to come closer to a full 162-game season
    • Regular use of on-field microphones by players, as an added bonus for TV viewers
    • Sitting in the empty stands 6 feet apart - the recommended social-distancing space - instead of in a dugout

    Each option, though far from certain, is likely to be bandied about in the coming days as the viability of the plan for everyone involved takes shape.

    The money discussion would not just be between the league and players but among the teams, too. Because local television contracts vary significantly by market - well over $100 million a year separate the top and bottom local TV deals - those reliant on gate revenues could seek a one-year change to the revenue-sharing plan among the 30 teams.

    The sides also would need to determine how many people would live inside the sport's so-called bubble alongside on-field and medical personnel and whether it would include front-office officials, scouts, video personnel and media, among others, sources said.

    As consequential and potentially tricky as some of the challenges may be, sources said the league and union are motivated to make the plan work because they realize the alternative may be worse for both sides: No baseball at all in 2020.

    http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/2...-early-arizona
    via @ESPN App http://espn.com/app


    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

  11. #1541
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCSownsU View Post
    Sources: MLB, union focused on plan that could allow season to start as early as May in Arizona



    http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/2...-early-arizona
    via @ESPN App http://espn.com/app


    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
    I'll bet MLB can all the ventilators and medical supplies, they need.



    Ignorance is bliss

  12. #1542
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Clearwater, Fl
    Posts
    21,009
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Detfink View Post
    So desperate for sports, I'm dreaming of some baseball....

    Projected...

    2B: DJ Lemahieu
    RF: A. Judge
    SS: G. Torres
    DH: G. Stanton
    C: G. Sanchez
    1B: Voit
    3B: M. Andujar
    CF: A. Hicks
    LF: C. Frazier

    I prefer this line up:

    2B: DJ Lemehieu
    CF: A. Hicks
    RF: A. Judge
    SS: G. Torres
    DH: Rotation Stanton-Judge-Gardner
    C: G. Sanchez
    1B: L. Voit
    3B: M. Andujar/G. Urshala
    LF: C. Frazier

    Bro, I get it, the same here...

    But realistically we are not having a season for 2020. Just get ready for the NFL.

    NBA, NHL, MLS, MLB will all be lost to the virus...I feel the virus will come to the end very quick but too many people will say it is too soon to start the season and stalling will ensue....

    IMO the Season is over folks!
    My favorite Top 10 Rolling Stones songs
    1. Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo ( Heartbreaker)
    2. Gimme Shelter
    3. Miss You
    4. Angie
    5. Sympathy for the Devil
    6. Anybody seen my Baby
    7. Paint it Black
    8. Rock and a Hard Place
    9. (I can’t get no) Satisfaction
    10. Undercover of the Night


  13. #1543
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    38,327
    Quote Originally Posted by rrzubnyy View Post
    Bro, I get it, the same here...

    But realistically we are not having a season for 2020. Just get ready for the NFL.

    NBA, NHL, MLS, MLB will all be lost to the virus...I feel the virus will come to the end very quick but too many people will say it is too soon to start the season and stalling will ensue....

    IMO the Season is over folks!
    https://forums.prosportsdaily.com/sh...php?p=33441934

  14. #1544
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Cold Spring, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by rrzubnyy View Post
    Bro, I get it, the same here...

    But realistically we are not having a season for 2020. Just get ready for the NFL.

    NBA, NHL, MLS, MLB will all be lost to the virus...I feel the virus will come to the end very quick but too many people will say it is too soon to start the season and stalling will ensue....

    IMO the Season is over folks!

    That's funny coming from someone that thinks the season is over if they lose the first game.
    The REAL DEAL Yankee fan

  15. #1545
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    The REAL DEAL Yankee fan

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