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  1. #2476
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShadyOne View Post
    Dinwiddie actually has a player option after next year. That was what he got in return for signing a cheap extension. He’s easily the best part of the deal you mentioned, and he’s basically a rental

    Take this with skepticism, but reading the response/comments from
    Beal and his agent, didn’t sound like a guy that wants out
    Levert is a beast. Allen is a young center and If you like dinwiddie you sign him to an extension. Levert is the main piece of that trade anyway. I doubt Beal goes anywhere, they’re getting wall back I’d think they’d give that team a shot before blowing anything up.
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  2. #2477
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxplayerxx23 View Post
    Levert is a beast. Allen is a young center and If you like dinwiddie you sign him to an extension. Levert is the main piece of that trade anyway. I doubt Beal goes anywhere, they’re getting wall back I’d think they’d give that team a shot before blowing anything up.
    Yeah Wizards will be interesting to see how they are when Wall comes back. They could have something like

    Wall-Beal-Rui-Bertans-Toppin

    If Wall comes back close to 100% of what he was they could be back in the playoff hunt. But if he’s a shell of himself I could see them blowing it up for a rebuild.

  3. #2478
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeartOfStarks View Post
    Yeah Wizards will be interesting to see how they are when Wall comes back. They could have something like

    Wall-Beal-Rui-Bertans-Toppin

    If Wall comes back close to 100% of what he was they could be back in the playoff hunt. But if he’s a shell of himself I could see them blowing it up for a rebuild.
    That’s probably going to be the worst defense in the history of the NBA.

  4. #2479
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxplayerxx23 View Post
    Levert is a beast. Allen is a young center and If you like dinwiddie you sign him to an extension. Levert is the main piece of that trade anyway. I doubt Beal goes anywhere, they’re getting wall back I’d think they’d give that team a shot before blowing anything up.
    I don’t know about a beast. Nice player, yes. And you can’t just sign him to an extension unless he wants it

    Good package though if he would resign

    On the negative side, Beal signed that 2 year extension to set himself up for a crippling next deal. I guess the Nets wouldnt worry, as they are obviously in all-in mode
    Last edited by ShadyOne; 05-25-2020 at 06:13 AM.

  5. #2480
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeartOfStarks View Post
    I would hesitate to give him that contract personally but I’m not saying that’s the right call or I have all the answers. I’m just not sure that’s a smart contract .
    That is because it would not be a smart contract. On this squad in NY he will be shutdown by opposing teams and he is not good enough to build around. FVV is perfect where he is at on a mix of good veterans and upcoming talent like Siakim. He will flounder in NY with these young guys on this team and we would be stuck with that contract while expectations are not being met.

  6. #2481
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungStuna View Post
    How does FVV block our PG? The top PGs all have 2 guard size. They can play together. Imagine LaMelo and FVV in the backcourt, our BBIQ and passing would be fantastic.

    FVV is a great volume 3PT shooter who can shoot with unlimited range. He would help our spacing so much. I still think FVV has room for improvement in the short/mid-range, that’s the main reason for his inefficiencies inside the 2PT line.

    I also think he’s a guy who would go to the FT line more being more of “the guy.” THJ wasn’t a PG and had no playmaking skills, so his inefficiencies were more glaring. FVV is also a way better defender than THJ who is below average. FVV guards most PGs fine.
    Don't you say you want us to draft Kira? And Cole is another strong possibility.

    ironically you hate Cole but he projects as a bigger better version of FVV.

  7. #2482
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    wow Lots of FVV posts........I'm off that train, unless he takes a Randle type contract or less....he no doubt would make us better but he's not going to be that game changer some think he will be.

    Unless there are other significant moves he'd be a waste of time at anything coming close to 25m.

    Wood I like and think he could be a really good player but you can't over pay yet on his body of work. Remember Copeland, I mean did he doing anything much less in limited time, should teams have lined up to pay him 20M? NO!

    A player like Wood still have some proving up to do, and then if he proves himself his next deal can' be his legacy. Right now I like would but also like him around 10-12m.......and some point a GM has to draw a line in the court and then walk away if it gets crossed.

    Ironically there are a couple of RFA's and they are worth it, so do you gamble, why not, they could be game changers.

    Well let's finish the season see where we draft then take it from there.......as usual we have likes of work to do, and need some luck...........Maybe with Mills gone it starts now

  8. #2483
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    Quote Originally Posted by still a fan View Post
    wow Lots of FVV posts........I'm off that train, unless he takes a Randle type contract or less....he no doubt would make us better but he's not going to be that game changer some think he will be.

    Unless there are other significant moves he'd be a waste of time at anything coming close to 25m.

    Wood I like and think he could be a really good player but you can't over pay yet on his body of work. Remember Copeland, I mean did he doing anything much less in limited time, should teams have lined up to pay him 20M? NO!

    A player like Wood still have some proving up to do, and then if he proves himself his next deal can' be his legacy. Right now I like would but also like him around 10-12m.......and some point a GM has to draw a line in the court and then walk away if it gets crossed.

    Ironically there are a couple of RFA's and they are worth it, so do you gamble, why not, they could be game changers.

    Well let's finish the season see where we draft then take it from there.......as usual we have likes of work to do, and need some luck...........Maybe with Mills gone it starts now
    Copeland is a good example, guy averaged over 20ppg PER 36 in his 56 games with us. Mind you that was when teams weren't dropping 120ppg left and right.

    Wood was at 22ppg but he just doesn't bring much else.

    but there's a reason these guys never get to 36mpg or even 30mpg, they are two one dimensional to play that much and get exposed if they do longterm.

  9. #2484
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    If we do sign Wood I’ll be disappointed in anything less then MVP consideration at this point


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    Quote Originally Posted by Raps08-09 Champ View Post
    My dick is named 'Ewing'.

  10. #2485
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    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    Copeland is a good example, guy averaged over 20ppg PER 36 in his 56 games with us. Mind you that was when teams weren't dropping 120ppg left and right.

    Wood was at 22ppg but he just doesn't bring much else.

    but there's a reason these guys never get to 36mpg or even 30mpg, they are two one dimensional to play that much and get exposed if they do longterm.
    I get the point. That happens a lot.

    But come on, Copeland? Wood had a much more consistent/sustained impact. I also don’t see him as one dimensional. He’s an athletic, versatile big, and he can defend

    Going overboard with that comparison. But really, I think most are in agreement we like him at the right dollars
    Last edited by ShadyOne; 05-25-2020 at 12:34 PM.

  11. #2486
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShadyOne View Post
    I get the point. That happens a lot.

    But come on, Copeland? Wood had a much more consistent/sustained impact. I also don’t see him as one dimensional. He’s an athletic, versatile big, and he can defend

    Going overboard with that comparison. But really, I think most are in agreement we like him at the right dollars
    Wood isn't a good defender by any means. He's big and athletic but so is Portis, doesn't make you a good defender.

    Wood doesn't rebound or pass particularly well either. He's pretty one dimensional. and what impact? DET went like 1-12 the last 13 games when Wood started. they were meaningless games with no pressure. Earl Barron killed it for us too and was never heard from again.

  12. #2487
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    I think the Wood assessments here are not too far off which is why I was suggesting targeting him more in a 6th man role on a reasonable deal. Maybe that doesn’t lure him from Detroit but it’s worth a shot.

  13. #2488
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    Christian Wood’s story has the makings of one of those Hollywood feel-good flicks. You’re familiar with that cliché but triumphant storyline where the basketball player barely makes the team, gets his moment and then ends up being the talk of the town. The plot has its own chapter in the “Making a Basketball Movie” how-to manual.

    Wood, a 24-year-old big man, has lived out that script this season with the Pistons. His ending, though, will include a multi-million-dollar pay increase.

    Wood has impressed all year, as a bench man and even as a starter. He’ll be an unrestricted free agent this summer after playing this season on a vet-minimum deal. At the trade deadline, the Rockets and Celtics, two championship-contending teams, made multiple offers to Detroit for Wood, per a source. The 2020 free agency class is considered blah, so don’t be surprised if Wood garners interest from teams with available cap space.

    The Pistons are ending the season amid a youth movement, inching closer to a top-five pick in the draft. But Wood’s 25-game audition as a starter and multifaceted player down the final stretch is a reason to tune in, as Detroit tries to figure out who he truly is (a starter or high-end bench player), and what he’s truly worth.

    Wood stepped into a starting role after the Pistons’ trade of Andre Drummond on Feb. 6. Since then, he has posted 20.0 points, 10.8 rebounds and 2.3 assists while shooting 53.7 percent from the field and 42.1 percent from 3 in 33.4 minutes per night. At the surface, those are starter’s numbers.

    What Wood will cost in the open market has been one of the lingering questions this season. He has a lot of things working for him: He’s long, athletic and young. He can stretch the floor, rebound and play both power forward and center (though he appears to be better guarding power forwards). He also can routinely create his own shot off the dribble. On the other hand, Wood doesn’t have much of a résumé (he’s played two more games this season than his previous three years combined). Questions about his maturity have followed him throughout his career. He also needs to become more impactful defensively given what is expected of players of his ilk. There are many reasons the Pistons should make him the big man of the future, and there are reasons they should continue to tread with caution.

    “He’s had a great year, for sure, but not sure everyone fully trusts it yet,” a league source told The Athletic. “It’s been the most consistent he’s shown his whole career. I think, maybe, $5 (million) to $7 million per year (is what he’ll get).”

    Then there’s this evaluation …

    “I would expect him to get a mid-level value, something like $9.7 (million) annually,” an NBA agent said.

    When examining Wood’s value in the open market, something between the contracts of the Kings’ Richaun Holmes and the Pacers’ Myles Turner feels like a good starting point — even though Turner’s deal is close to double what many anticipate Wood getting.

    Like Wood, Holmes was a bit of an unknown before signing his two-year, $9.77 million deal this past summer (close to $5 million annually). At 6-feet-10, he’s the same height as Wood. He’s had a breakout season in Sacramento — he’s a solid defender and rebounder, as well as an efficient and low-maintenance offensive player. But Holmes, while valuable, is what he is. And while he does some of the traditional big-man stuff better than his counterpart in Detroit, Wood is better and more diverse offensively, and that’s critical at this stage in the evolution of the NBA game. Wood appears to have more value than Holmes.

    Now on to Turner, the No. 11 pick in the 2015 draft. Turner recently signed a four-year, $80 million deal that pays him $17.5 million annually. That pay day came in large part because of projections for the 23-year-old’s future. Turner is a bigger name than Wood, so many may think Wood has no chance at that type of money. However, Wood’s agent can make an argument that the two aren’t as far apart as many casual observers believe.

    Turner has been more productive and consistent throughout his short career, but he is having a bit of a down year. He’s started all 45 games that he’s appeared in this season, averaging 11.9 points, 6.1 rebounds and 1.9 blocks with a true-shooting percentage of 56.8. That is somewhat close to on par with Wood’s overall numbers this season (11.2 points, 5.7 rebounds, 0.8 blocks, true-shooting percentage of 66), and Wood has started 40 fewer games. It’s only been five games, but Wood’s numbers as a starter are on pace to far exceed Turner’s. Furthermore, Wood’s per-36 stats this season are better than any Turner has posted in his career.

    Wood’s 2019-20 per-36 stats, per Basketball-Reference:

    Turner’s per-36 stats for his career:

    To be fair, Wood has yet to show that he can play 36-plus minutes consistently, which is why these final 25 games are critical. (Comparing per-36 numbers can create a flimsy argument.) Turner has consistency on his side. Also, Turner shares the frontcourt with an All-Star big man, so the case could be made that his development has been hindered.

    It seems unlikely Wood will receive a contract similar in value to Turner’s, especially since the value of the big man has declined, but it’s a discussion Wood’s agent can have with earnestness.

    Dwight Powell’s Mavericks contract is probably the sweet spot for Wood. Powell is in the final season of a four-year, $37.3 million deal that he signed at 25, a year older than Wood is now. Powell, like Wood, is a 6-foot-10 power forward. He’s floats between average and above-average defensively, and he does just enough offensively. Wood is far more gifted as an offensive player and has youth on his side. Defensively, Wood is closer to Powell, who will make north of $10.2 million this season, than he is Holmes or Turner.

    A deal similar to the construction of Powell’s makes the most sense for Wood at this point. A contract that pays Wood $10 million per year seems reasonable given his skill set and age. Something like three years, $30 million, give or take, would probably make both sides happy.

    Wood is in the midst of a multi-million-dollar audition.

    “I would expect a three-year deal, but if he gets four, he and his agent killed it,” the agent said. “It’s hard for his level of player to get real long deals unless you have tons of leverage. The league is going shorter on the length of deals.”
    https://theathletic.com/1616534/2020...t-the-pistons/
    Last edited by YoungStuna; 05-25-2020 at 03:41 PM. Reason: Added quotes/link

  14. #2489
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    Christian Wood’s numbers post-trade deadline speak for themselves. If you’re the Pistons’ front office, or the front office of any rebuilding team, how much stock can you put into Wood’s numbers given the sample size? Additionally, should they have a cap on how high they’re going to go in the open market if they get into a bidding war?

    So, I have some history with Wood. I don’t think I’m betraying any confidences by saying that I was a huge supporter of signing him when I was with the Bucks, as his talent and potential fit as a mobile, skilled, hybrid power forward/center in today’s game. In a way, he became a victim of our success in 2018-19.

    He was quite obviously too good for the G League, averaging 29 and 14 with over a steal and two blocks per game. To contextualize, he put up 63.1 true shooting on a 30.1 usage rate. There have been eight total player seasons of 63-plus true shooting percentage and 30-plus usage — three by Kevin Durant, two each by LeBron James and Steph Curry and one by Giannis Antetokounmpo. That was Wood in the G League. But, there wasn’t a rotation spot for him on a team winning 60 games with the MVP playing essentially the same position, so when we had some backcourt injuries late in the season, Wood was the guy we had to let go to bring in point guard depth. But that had everything to do with the exigencies of the moment for a team trying to win a title in the immediate future and nothing to do with Wood’s talent, which he continued to demonstrate with a strong end-of-season cameo in New Orleans.

    Still, until a player has actually done it in real minutes at the NBA level — Wood had played 503 mostly garbage-time minutes across parts of three seasons entering the season — there are always doubts about whether someone is a “quadruple-A player,” too good for the minors, but not quite big-league level. In his first season getting regular rotation minutes. I think it’s fair to say Wood’s performance this year was more than sufficient to address that particular concern. I think you’ve probably covered just how good Wood has been sufficiently, so I won’t rehash with a bunch of numbers.

    He’s shown he’s an NBA player worthy of a rotation spot, but how will that play out in terms of what the free-agent marketplace will look like? Even before the cap crunch likely to result from the shutdown and related revenue loss, the group of teams with significant cap space available was pretty small, including the Hawks, Hornets and Heat, with a few other teams (such as Phoenix and New York) in range with another move or two. With John Collins in place and having just traded for Clint Capela, Atlanta is probably off the list of those who might offer a big number. Meanwhile, the Heat are likely to be aiming at superstar talent either this summer or next, so a multiyear offer for Wood isn’t likely. Despite his strong production in 2019-20, other teams with potential interest might still be skittish about a big multiyear guarantee given the lack of track record. All of which is to say it’s hard to see an exceedingly robust market of external suitors.

    So the question for the Pistons’ brain trust is mostly how long of a commitment do they want to make and how much compared to what Wood is willing to take? Prior to the shutdown, the 2021 offseason was already shaping up to be a much better market for players. with significantly more free agency money available, which provides a player like Wood some incentive to bet on himself with a short-term deal to get back on the market next year if he doesn’t get the average annual value he’s seeking in a multiyear offer this summer. In normal times, I would bet against Wood being willing to accept a long-term deal paying less than the low teens, and could probably talk myself into around three years, $40 million, if I was reasonably confident in Wood’s long-term fit with the organization’s future.

    Of course, that analysis is all the framework of the pre-shutdown cap environment. With the cap and possibly entire CBA regime likely to change dramatically, who knows?
    https://theathletic.com/1811460/2020...eir-potential/
    Last edited by YoungStuna; 05-25-2020 at 03:41 PM. Reason: added quotes/link

  15. #2490
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    those are two more realistic Wood articles. I think the tide has turned against Wood because people starting throwing out "all star" and $20m, even 25m per year for him. But he makes sense for a some teams at a more reasonable figure.

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