Like us on Facebook


Follow us on Twitter





Page 5 of 816 FirstFirst ... 345671555105505 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 12240
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    11,015
    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    Ball, Frank & RJ would make for alot of size at the 1,2,3 and alot of playmaking, ballhandling.
    Ball can't shoot either. I like him as well but just sayin' . Cole would be ideal

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    16,169

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    34,439
    Quote Originally Posted by Bivory View Post
    Ball can't shoot either. I like him as well but just sayin' . Cole would be ideal
    i think its too early to say that, i think he'll project to be a very good shooter.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    16,169

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    16,169

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    16,169
    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    Ball, Frank & RJ would make for alot of size at the 1,2,3 and alot of playmaking, ballhandling.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bivory View Post
    Ball can't shoot either. I like him as well but just sayin' . Cole would be ideal
    The thing that appeals to me about Ball is that he's like a magician with the ball...just as good of a passer as Lonzo.

    The difference is he has more of a game off the bounce. Lonzo has steadily improved as a shooter, no reason LaMelo can't either.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    5,729
    Knicks if they are smart they take LaMelo

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    16,169
    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    not that we should take him anyway but the more studs in hte draft the better.
    Definitely and he's the only big also which helps.

    My thoughts on them taking him if they opportunity presented itself is that they better be sure he can be the second pillar next to RJ. Only way it would make sense to take another big and essentially replace Mitch.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    34,439
    Quote Originally Posted by smood999 View Post
    Definitely and he's the only big also which helps.

    My thoughts on them taking him if they opportunity presented itself is that they better be sure he can be the second pillar next to RJ. Only way it would make sense to take another big and essentially replace Mitch.
    and Mitch wouldn't fetch all that much in the trade market so I'd prefer to get a PG.

    Changing your tune on Frank? he;s looking like a legit piece. moreso than even Knox or Mitch at this point. Just an all around player.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    11,015
    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    and Mitch wouldn't fetch all that much in the trade market so I'd prefer to get a PG.

    Changing your tune on Frank? he;s looking like a legit piece. moreso than even Knox or Mitch at this point. Just an all around player.
    Lets not get ahead of ourselves...lol...

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    34,439
    Quote Originally Posted by Bivory View Post
    Lets not get ahead of ourselves...lol...
    you know i like Knox but his defense is a real issue. he doesn't really bring anything outside of shooting right now... and Mitch's feel and IQ is a big issue as well. those things are hard to fix, definitely harder than Frank continuing to slowly improve his offense and shot. the D is for real.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    16,169
    NBA draft No. 1 pick debate: Who are the real contenders in 2020?

    After starting off last year at No. 3 in our draft rankings behind teammate R.J. Barrett and UNC's Nassir Little, Duke's Zion Williamson quickly climbed to No. 1 and held down that consensus top spot for the rest of the year.

    How is the race for the No. 1 pick shaping up in 2020?

    Memphis big man James Wiseman starts off the year on top. Why does he have the spot? How deep does the field of contenders go? And which prospect has the highest ceiling?

    Our draft experts answer the big questions about this year's race before the college season begins.

    Why is Wiseman No. 1 to start the year?

    Jonathan Givony: That's a great question, one we've been wrestling with for the past six months. Our initial projection had Washington forward Jaden McDaniels at No. 1, Georgia guard Anthony Edwards at No. 2 and Wiseman at No. 3. A rough senior year for McDaniels, highlighted by an especially poor showing on the high school all-star game circuit, eventually convinced us to move him all the way down to No. 9, with Wiseman moving up to No. 1 after strong showings at the McDonald's All-American Game, Nike Hoop Summit and Jordan Brand Classic.

    Wiseman might be more of a placeholder at the top until a more solid candidate emerges. We debated moving both LaMelo Ball (whom NBA teams have yet to fully warm to) and Edwards (the least known of the group in scouting circles) to No. 1 this week. That could still happen fairly early in the college season. This draft is wide open at the top.

    The clearest reason to go with Wiseman now is that he's who most NBA teams have atop their board. Another surprising reason is positional scarcity. After a 2019 draft that featured just one center in the lottery and two in the top 25, there's a case that the teams at the top of the 2020 draft will have a real need for a big man in Wiseman's mold.

    Look at the five teams at the bottom of ESPN's power rankings: the New York Knicks, Sacramento Kings, Cleveland Cavaliers, Charlotte Hornets and Washington Wizards. All of them could at least consider picking a franchise-caliber center at No. 1 if given the opportunity. While post-ups are unlikely to return as a default option for coaches, everyone needs an athletic, pick-and-roll-finishing, rim-protecting, switchy 7-footer who can contend with Joel Embiid, Karl-Anthony Towns and Nikola Jokic.

    Still, Wiseman needs a productive, efficient, winning season to hold this spot once draft day rolls around. All the mystery around him sitting out Memphis' exhibitions isn't helping matters. Unlike last year, I suspect we're going to be having this No. 1 pick conversation for a while.

    Mike, what do you think?

    Mike Schmitz: Wiseman's body of work and his freakish physical profile certainly warrant consideration at the No. 1 spot. But I do wonder if we (myself included) put a little too much stock in Wiseman's showing at the 2019 Hoop Summit, which has proved to be fool's gold at times in the past (see Skal Labissiere).

    In Portland, Wiseman was dominant as a defensive anchor, blocking six shots in just 22 minutes while smoothly knocking down face-up jumpers and running the floor impressively. He was equally as dominant during the Jordan Brand Classic practices and game.

    But it's fair to wonder: Did Wiseman simply turn it on at the right time against lesser competition? Will he revert back to the big we saw float through games? If he's not playing with a consistent motor and toughness, what does he reliably bring to the table?

    I was riding high on Wiseman myself after those performances, and I do think he's the guy NBA teams feel most comfortable with at this point. But rewatching bigs such as Evan Mobley and Isaiah Stewart go at him time and time again at the high school level reminded me why we had questions about him in the first place.

    I might have some recency bias, having just returned from a scouting trip to Australia, but I'd rather take LaMelo Ball. I also don't think Wiseman has the highest floor. I'd actually lean Edwards there.

    Wiseman figures to be a useful player, but if he never becomes a defensive anchor or a legitimate floor spacer, what's his greatest value add on the floor? Most of the bigs finding success today can really read the game, and that's an area where Wiseman still has work to do. At the very least with Edwards, you're getting an aggressive, confident three-level scorer with two-way potential and the exact athletic profile of several successful NBA guards.

    Who has the highest ceiling?

    Schmitz: JG, What are your thoughts on Edwards, and who do you think has the highest superstar ceiling?

    Givony: While last year's playoffs reemphasized the importance of the NBA big man, the high pace and scoring outputs we're seeing so far this season unquestionably tell us how important it is to have a go-to creator who can get you a bucket. Edwards has the most upside there.

    We don't have a ton of data points on Edwards at this stage. He was a late bloomer on a weak high school squad with very little help or structure. He played on the weaker Under Armour circuit with a team that lost more games than it won. He surprisingly declined an invite to USA Basketball a year ago, which likely cost him a spot at the Nike Hoop Summit in April. And he is one of the youngest players in this class, having elected to reclassify up a year, which removed even more opportunities to evaluate him against top-level competition. But what we have seen of Edwards is awfully impressive.

    He is perhaps the most physically gifted guard in this class, listed at 6-foot-5, 225 pounds by Georgia, with a wingspan nearing 7 feet and impressive athletic ability. His potential operating out of ball screens is off the charts because of his ability to get into his pull-up jumper, the way he bounces off opponents en route to the rim and his dynamic play in transition. He shows you flashes as a passer and defender -- two areas in which he perhaps has the most room for growth. And he really doesn't have major holes in his game besides his lack of experience.

    How Edwards looks in February and March will be a lot more important to me than how he looks in November, and how much growth he displays will hopefully tell us a lot about his overall upside. Edwards (and North Carolina guard Cole Anthony) will provide some of the best entertainment value for casual fans to observe over the course of the college season.

    How many No. 1 pick contenders are there?

    Givony: Mike, how deep does the list of realistic No. 1 pick contenders go? Is there anyone we're not talking about who could leap up that high?

    Schmitz: For now, the list includes Edwards, Wiseman, Ball and Anthony. Personally, I think the first three have a leg up on Anthony in terms of NBA upside, but given his EYBL production and how electric Coby White looked under Roy Williams last season, I'd expect the UNC freshman to be one of the most productive players in the country. That should keep him in the discussion.

    As for potential No. 1 sleepers, a couple of months back I likely would have said Deni Avdija deserved at least a sniff at the top, but his lack of playing time and productivity with Maccabi Tel Aviv thus far likely takes him out of contention. However, if he were in the NCAA getting 35 minutes a game, I think he'd be in the mix, and I'm still enamored with his versatility.

    I don't actually see a realistic dark horse No. 1 pick at this juncture, but there are a few top-10-caliber prospects I'll be watching closely early on, starting with Jaden McDaniels. There's a reason he was once No. 1 on our board. I was at Washington practice a few weeks ago, and it's fair to say he's one of the most tantalizing prospects in the draft. He's at least 6-10, moves fluidly across the court, has great feet defensively, can handle and pass and carries the potential to make shots with his feet set or off the dribble. He could earn some Cam Reddish comparisons with his inconsistent production. But if he maximizes his talent, he could easily reenter the top-five discussion and emerge as a threat toward the top of the draft. He's that talented.

    After McDaniels, I have my eye on Tyrese Haliburton and Tyrese Maxey. While they may not end up being as productive, I wonder if the gap between them and Anthony is as large as we currently project. Haliburton was outstanding while operating strictly on the ball this summer at the U19 World Championships. He plays both ends with incredible instincts at 6-foot-5, and he knocks down standstill 3s at a high clip, despite funky mechanics. I've always loved the way Maxey plays, and his off-the-dribble shooting and scoring instincts should earn him fans among NBA front offices.

    JG, what will you be watching most closely in the No. 1 pick race to start the season?

    Givony: I want to see how Anthony opens the season. He's drawing the widest variance of opinions from NBA teams. Even though he was the MVP of both McDonald's and Jordan Brand and would have been the MVP of the Hoop Summit if that were awarded, there was quite a bit of negativity around him this spring when I talked privately with NBA scouts.

    It's easy to nitpick Anthony, as he can play a ball-dominant and sometimes ugly style of basketball, with plenty of bad shots, head-down drives and questionable body language. He came up flat in some of his biggest high school games, getting dominated by Cade Cunningham and Montverde, shooting 4-for-16 from the field in the Geico Nationals semifinals in a loss to La Lumiere and losing to an unheralded Imhotep team at the City of Palms semifinals. A lot of that was put to bed in the spring with the way he played on the all-star circuit, and he certainly couldn't have picked a better place to showcase himself than at North Carolina, where the ball will be in his hands on one of the fastest-paced teams in the country.

    Say what you want about Anthony's style, but you have to respect his scoring instincts, hunger for getting into the teeth of the defense, shot-making prowess and willingness to put his body on the line for hustle plays. He's a better passer than he gets credit for, especially when he's letting the game come to him, and he can really get up and guard people when he's operating at maximum intensity.

    It will be fascinating to see which version of Anthony we get over the course of the season. How much will he help UNC win and will he make his teammates better? Is he more Derrick Rose or Collin Sexton?

    Mike, if the draft were today, who would you select No. 1?

    Schmitz: LaMelo Ball.

    Do I think this is the route that NBA teams will ultimately go? No. There still seems to be a fair amount of skepticism surrounding what comes along with drafting Ball. Whichever franchise selects him likely needs to feel it has the proper infrastructure in place to handle the potential distractions that could follow him, and teams with that type of stability usually aren't the ones drafting at the top. Unlike NBA teams, though, I don't have to think about having Facebook cameras in my locker room, so it's far easier for me to rank Ball at No. 1 than an NBA general manager trying to build a team culture or fighting to keep his job.

    But I believe Ball is the best prospect in the draft at the moment. He and Edwards are close, and I could very well have a different answer after getting an extensive look at Georgia. However, I haven't seen many 18-year-olds with Ball's passing feel, creativity and overall basketball instincts. He makes one or two wow plays every single game, and his production in Australia's National Basketball League thus far has been admirable given the lack of weapons on his team.

    He's rarely rattled, with the confidence and ability to turn broken plays into magic like few other prospects I've evaluated. Simply put, these other prospects can become better shooters, decision makers or defenders, but they'll never have LaMelo's creativity with the ball. On top of that, he's far shiftier than his brother Lonzo, with more upside as a scorer. Yes, he can become a more disciplined, willing defender. Yes, he would benefit from relying on fewer deep pull-ups. Yes, he still uses somewhat of a low release push shot and is hitting just 18.4% of his 3-point attempts. Yes, he may not be one for grueling practice sessions.

    But Ball can roll out of bed and give you a triple-double while making deliveries few other players on the planet would even think of attempting. If it all clicks, Ball has a chance to be special. Give me the 6-7 point guard who can make every read, put defenders on skates, make shots with range and who at least has the tools and instincts to be a factor defensively. With teammate Aaron Brooks now out for the year with a torn Achilles and the Illawarra Hawks at 1-6, we'll certainly have our eye on how Ball's role changes and whether he remains engaged during what could be a long season for his club.
    https://www.espn.com/nba/insider/sto...ontenders-2020

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    34,439
    ultimately i do think Knox will get bigger and stronger and needs to move to the 4, and i think he'll be a Rashard Lewis type there. does Fiz and the FO know this is the question

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    16,169
    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    and Mitch wouldn't fetch all that much in the trade market so I'd prefer to get a PG.

    Changing your tune on Frank? he;s looking like a legit piece. moreso than even Knox or Mitch at this point. Just an all around player.
    Definitely much improved this season and last night's game is exactly what his supporters were expecting, but what doubters like me couldn't see.

    Hopefully it continues, but I still have my doubts about him being the long term starter. I'm kinda back to my original thought, when he was a rookie, that he can be the combo guard off the bench in a Marcus Smart role. The reason I couldn't really wrap my head around it is Smart's aggressive nature vs. Frank's passiveness.

    With that said, I'd be looking to put him in a three guard rotation alongside RJ and hopefully the PG they draft in June. RJ and Frank can play 1-3, so there's a lot of versatility there and he won't necessarily be buried if/when the Knicks draft their long term answer at PG.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    11,015
    Quote Originally Posted by nycericanguy View Post
    you know i like Knox but his defense is a real issue. he doesn't really bring anything outside of shooting right now... and Mitch's feel and IQ is a big issue as well. those things are hard to fix, definitely harder than Frank continuing to slowly improve his offense and shot. the D is for real.
    Put it this way. Knox and Mitchs deficiencies have never been so much of an issue where we thought they may not be a piece whereas Franks game, until now, has. I look forward to Knox and Mitch in their 3rd yr.

Page 5 of 816 FirstFirst ... 345671555105505 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •