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  1. #436
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    Brodie enjoyed doing that also.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  2. #437
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    Remember when Nimmo was almost included in the Jay Bruce trade? Eerily similar to McNeil almost being put in the Cano trade.


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  3. #438
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    As a guy who saw Nimmo as a 4th outfielder the dude has shown to be pretty elite.

  4. #439
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zmaster52 View Post
    Remember when Nimmo was almost included in the Jay Bruce trade? Eerily similar to McNeil almost being put in the Cano trade.


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    Almost only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.

    Remember when Brody traded for Keon Broxton when he was going to be DFA'd.
    Or Billy Hamilton.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  5. #440
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungStuna View Post
    BVW would have drafted him
    How many times did Brody go overslot in the 1st round?
    He actually signed Baty for less 3.9M for slot of 4.3. So the likelihood of him drafting Giolito is remote at best.

    His regime drafted players that fell and signed them for overslot money.

    Brody's 2 drafts were all about 4 players, Baty, Allan, Ginn & Crow-Armstrong.
    There was no depth behind them, he will have to hit on all 4 players because if he doesn't, this farm will have a harder climb than what was originally thought of.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  6. #441
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    Lmao one draft literally had 5 rounds and he came away with two first round talent.

  7. #442
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sick Of It All View Post
    Lmao one draft literally had 5 rounds and he came away with two first round talent.
    Passed on Garret Mitchell in the 1st round last year for a defensive specialist.

    Fangraphs has only Allan of the last two drafts with a FV of 50. He does have some control problems, hopefully the new Mets Pitching lab can clean up his control problems.

    Baty, Ginn and Crow all have FV of 45. Let's see how they pan out before hailing these drafts as successes, as I wrote, he has to hit on all 4 picks.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  8. #443
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claymation View Post
    Passed on Garret Mitchell in the 1st round last year for a defensive specialist.

    Fangraphs has only Allan of the last two drafts with a FV of 50. He does have some control problems, hopefully the new Mets Pitching lab can clean up his control problems.

    Baty, Ginn and Crow all have FV of 45. Let's see how they pan out before hailing these drafts as successes, as I wrote, he has to hit on all 4 picks.
    Don’t change the fact that he came away with 2 first round talent in a draft that had 5 rounds. Lmao

  9. #444
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sick Of It All View Post
    Don’t change the fact that he came away with 2 first round talent in a draft that had 5 rounds. Lmao
    LMAO, a 45 FV is hardly anything to write home about. You are looking at a David Peterson type of pitcher or a Luis Guillorme type of everyday player.

    Allan should be a nice piece if he can get command of his pitches. Hopefully the new Pitching Lab can correct that.

    And here's hoping they prove Fangraphs wrong.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  10. #445
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claymation View Post
    LMAO, a 45 FV is hardly anything to write home about. You are looking at a David Peterson type of pitcher or a Luis Guillorme type of everyday player.

    Allan should be a nice piece if he can get command of his pitches. Hopefully the new Pitching Lab can correct that.

    And here's hoping they prove Fangraphs wrong.
    And since when is grades the all and end all?

  11. #446
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    The Mets made Major League moves prior to the season -- the trade for Francisco Lindor and his subsequent 10-year contract extension the most notable among them -- that were designed to bring playoff baseball back to Queens for the first time since 2016.

    The organization also boasts a young system with four Top 100 prospects in Francisco Alvarez, Ronny Mauricio, Matthew Allan and Brett Baty, all of whom are 21 years old or younger and have yet to play above the Low-A level. Though the pipeline isn't as deep as some others, it does boast the young core that some rebuilding clubs desire for their Minor League foundations. It's the group of four -- and you could extend that out to six with 19-year-old Pete Crow-Armstrong and 21-year-old J.T. Ginn -- that anyone could see the Mets forming their long-term plans around.

    That may be true of other clubs or even the old Mets, but not these ones. As talented as Alvarez and company are, their jobs as prospects and future rookies will be to supplement the likes of Lindor, Jacob deGrom and others who will be in New York for the long haul.

    "We have a shortstop that's going to be here for a long period of time," said Mets director of player development Kevin Howard. "We have some other guys that have long-term deals. The focus is winning in the big leagues and then developing each player so they can contribute to that success."

    Howard was responding to the concept that the Mets' young core could start together when the Minor League season begins on May 4. After all, all four Top 100 prospects participated in last year's alternate site in Brooklyn and received decent looks at Major League camp this spring. Baty and Allan -- both 2019 Draft picks -- finished their first Minor League seasons by helping Class A Short Season Brooklyn capture a New York-Penn League title. Alvarez was a step lower at Rookie Advanced Kingsport, and Mauricio was one rung above at Class A Columbia.

    Since the canceled 2020 Minor League season is the great equalizer in terms of in-game experience, it's worth wondering if the Mets would consider placing the group on the same 2021 Opening Day roster and getting them going collectively. That isn't likely.

    "As far as us keeping them together as a group so they can win, that's not something that we're really focused on," Howard said. "We're focused on having an individual plan for each guy and then designing a daily process where those guys can contribute to getting better. Then hopefully, that plan turns into success for that individual."

    By way of having already seen full-season ball, Mauricio figures to open higher than the other three, perhaps as high as Double-A Binghamton where he could focus on getting more out of his plus power potential as a switch-hitter. Baty will have his own 60-grade pop to tap into as he makes his full-season debut. Allan, like many young pitchers, will narrow on taking his already improving changeup to the next level, thus complementing his other plus offerings in his heater and curve. Alvarez will get to grow defensively behind the plate with more reps and continue to round into one of the game's best young all-around catching prospects.

    Because of what's happening at the top level, the pressure isn't there for this group to be the future of Mets baseball, but the potential certainly is.

    "I think we handle them by trying to help these guys value what's going to turn into long-term success," Howard said. "That's concentrating on their process, focusing on what they can control. I think all these guys that we're talking about, they went to Major League camp because they had the mental capacity to focus on those things. They've all been great. I don't have any concerns about any of them."

    No. 23 prospect Tylor Megill -- an eighth-round pick as an Arizona senior in 2018 -- showed signs of tiring at the end of his first full season in 2019. Though he struck out 92 batters in 71 2/3 innings as a starter and reliever, his velocity dropped to the lower-90s by the time he made a late-season cameo with Double-A Binghamton. That has not been a concern this spring down in Port St. Lucie. According to Howard, the 6-foot-7 right-hander is back up to 95-96 in April workouts, right in line with where he was during last year's instructional league. Add in an above-average breaking ball, and Megill could be a popup pitcher in the upper levels to open 2021.

    "He can do what he wants with the ball," Howard said. "He can be a power pitcher, or he can pitch with finesse. I've been impressed with how well-rounded of a pitcher he is."

    On the position player side, Mark Vientos has picked right up where he left off during a strong Major League camp. The Mets' No. 8 prospect went 3-for-6 with two doubles in limited looks, but perhaps most impressively, he also walked four times, showing off a patience not typically seen from prospects that can get overeager in their attempts to impress the top brass. Vientos has the plus power potential to make an impact at Citi Field some day and will continue to get looks at his natural position of third base and across the diamond at first to give him multiple routes to Flushing.

    "I think his mindset is advanced," Howard said. "I think he deals with things that come up that other players might react negatively to. I think he deals with those things more maturely than most hitters his age. I've really been impressed by how he makes adjustments, not only at-bat to at-bat, but pitch to pitch. He knows why he chases. He knows his swing and why he's doing what he's doing. All of that is like an older player."


    Going the other way, No. 7 prospect Khalil Lee didn't quite make the first impression he would have wanted in Grapefruit League action. The Mets acquired the 22-year-old outfielder from the Royals in a February three-team deal that primarily sent Andrew Benintendi from Boston to Kansas City and had hopes that Lee's plus run tool, plus arm and solid outfield defense could help the Major League cause before long. However, Lee, who is on the 40-man roster, struck out in nine of his 18 plate appearances in Major League Spring Training and went 0-for-16 overall in Florida.

    Now at the Mets' alternate site in Brooklyn, Lee has focused on using the skills that he already possesses and translating those into his work at the plate. If he can make more contact and put balls into gaps, Lee has the chance to turn singles into doubles and could carve out a spot for himself alongside other New York outfielders.

    "He's working on staying athletic," Howard said, "using that athleticism to get himself into better positions, getting himself behind the ball, keeping his bat in the zone for a longer time so he can be a little bit off but still get extra-base hits. I think at times his effort and his [desire] to be great can turn into the swing getting in and out of the zone. So he's trying to put himself in better positions where he's able to not be perfect but still adjust to pitches and drive the ball."

    Prospect we'll be talking about in 2022
    At No. 9, Alexander Ramirez is the highest-ranked Mets prospect no one has seen on an official Minor League field as of yet.

    The 6-foot-3 outfielder signed for $2.05 million in July 2019 because he shows at least average skills with all five tools. (His run tool, in particular, comes in at a 55 on the 20-80 scale heading into 2021.) His Minor League debut, likely in the Dominican Summer League, was wiped out by the coronavirus pandemic. Instead, that time will come in 2021 in what will be his age-18 season, and the Mets couldn't be more enthused about finally seeing him in competition.

    "He's just an unbelievable, exciting kid to watch," Howard said. "Very natural and athletic in the outfield. Very explosive with his swing. He's a natural center fielder. He doesn't need much coaching out there offensively. There are going to be some things that he's going to have to improve but, for now with a guy like him, you just let him be natural and explosive and let him figure things out on his own."

    Where Ramirez will see first is yet to be determined. Since he's in Florida already, the two options at present would appear to be Low-A St. Lucie or the only stateside short-season option in the Gulf Coast League. Ramirez's present skill set should let the Mets be as aggressive as they want to be with a player still awaiting his first Minor League at-bat.

    "He'd be fine in either place," Howard said.


    MLB.COM

  12. #447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claymation View Post
    LMAO, a 45 FV is hardly anything to write home about. You are looking at a David Peterson type of pitcher or a Luis Guillorme type of everyday player.

    Allan should be a nice piece if he can get command of his pitches. Hopefully the new Pitching Lab can correct that.

    And here's hoping they prove Fangraphs wrong.
    That's a little unfair. You have to look at the full picture:

    Fastball Curveball Changeup Command FV
    55 / 60 55 / 70 45 / 60 30 / 45 50

    Matt Allan has an above average fastball and curveball with potential to be all star FB and Ace Curveball. He has a below average changeup with potential to be all star level. His command is really bad right now and potential at the moment isn't great. But he is also only 20 years old so he has a lot of growth opportunity.

    We have to remember, he was a third round pick because he wasn't a slam dunk. But he is a first round talent and Fangraphs scouting shows that. His fastball, curve, and change are all all star potential and he is young and can get better. That is a first round talent that Brodie picked up

  13. #448
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyubi256 View Post
    That's a little unfair. You have to look at the full picture:

    Fastball Curveball Changeup Command FV
    55 / 60 55 / 70 45 / 60 30 / 45 50

    Matt Allan has an above average fastball and curveball with potential to be all star FB and Ace Curveball. He has a below average changeup with potential to be all star level. His command is really bad right now and potential at the moment isn't great. But he is also only 20 years old so he has a lot of growth opportunity.

    We have to remember, he was a third round pick because he wasn't a slam dunk. But he is a first round talent and Fangraphs scouting shows that. His fastball, curve, and change are all all star potential and he is young and can get better. That is a first round talent that Brodie picked up
    I seem to recall Wheeler having control issues
    Allan sounds a lot like Wheeler, great FB/CB with control issues

    “ Even before he got drafted, Wheeler's fastball has been able to consistently hit over 95 miles per hour. As a result, that is his out pitch and one that he relies upon on a regular basis. Wheeler also has an above-average curveball with a very good break to it.

    However, despite the speed and talent he has, he could use some improvement with his command and mechanics.

    According to Adam Foster of Project Prospect, "Similar to his fastball, Wheeler has room to improve his curveball command. He's presently getting some swing-throughs on curveballs out of the zone that many big leaguer hitters won't offer at." Wheeler throws a change-up as well, but he does not use that pitch as often as the fastball and curveball.”

    “ Pitch counts and a cracked fingernail that wouldn't heal quickly limited him to just 59 innings for Low-A Augusta in '10. He had serious command issues and walked 38 men, but he was also overpowering, fanning 70 and allowing just 47 hits (.218 average against) for a 3.99 ERA.

    Moved up to San Jose in the High-A California League for 2011, Wheeler continued to have command issues and walked 47 in 88 innings, while maintaining excellent K/IP and H/IP rates (98 whiffs, 74 hits, .224 average against). Traded to the Mets in late July, he was assigned to High-A St. Lucie in the Florida State League and pitched brilliantly, posting a 2.00 ERA in six starts with a 31/5 K/BB ratio in 27 innings. Thus far in 2012, he's 4-2, 1.97 in eight starts in Double-A, with a 51/21 K/BB in 46 innings, 27 hits allowed, and a .175 average against.

    Wheeler is a 6-4, 185 pound right-handed hitter and thrower, born May 30, 1990. His key pitch is a 93-97 MPH fastball, a plus pitch with both velocity and impressive movement. He utilizes a slider/cutter, a power curve, and a changeup. The curveball is his best secondary pitch but all of them have strong potential. Statistically, his excellent dominance ratios provide objective confirmation of the quality of his stuff. His biggest issue has been simple command. He threw strikes much more efficiently after going back to his high school mechanics last summer, but his walk rate has spiked upward again this spring, granted the rest of his numbers remain excellent.

    Wheeler projects as a number two starter and we should see him in New York sometime next year. The Mets don't rush prospects like they used to, and I anticipate they will be patient with him while he polishes his command.”
    Last edited by Larry M; 04-21-2021 at 07:47 AM.

  14. #449
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    I actually really like Allan and think Wheeler is a good comp for him. PCA I also think is legit and could play a major league CF if he were called up today. Baty is another guy that I like because of his hitting ability but his swing is too long, making him easily exposed as a hitter.

    Mauricio I think needs to continue developing, dude came into ST looking like the Hulk. Let him work on different facets of the ball and maybe he’ll be a future 3B replacement. Alvarez I don’t know much about, he looked okay in spring training but he has a ways to go.

    Mets have a really nice too heavy farm. They need more solid guys in the 15-30 range for the farm system but their top 4-8guys (you could probably throw in Vientos, Khalil Lee, and JT Ginn) are all major league caliber players IMO.

    BVW did well with his draft, Sandy and Co also did well with their respective drafts and international signings.

    Now only if this team could make good trades and sign good free agents.


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  15. #450
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