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  1. #1
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    Left and Right and Religion

    I've always heard "the Religious Right", but years ago it was talking about a portion of people on the right who were driven by their religion to support certain positions, but it didn't represent the whole right ... whereas now it seems if you are on the right you are always assumed to be religious, and to succeed on the right in politics you almost have to pander to that belief. To me the Religious Right was always kind of a crazy group.

    Meanwhile, other religions seem to have found a home on the left, even religions that have VERY conservative core beliefs. That I find very strange. The left seemed the side of scientists and educated questioners. It pre-dates Trump, but Trump certainly helped that line be drawn more clearly.

    If we go back to the 60s the left was a place where free-love and no rules found a home, and God did not. Can someone explain why this is happening? Or has it always been thus and it's just more obvious than it was?

  2. #2
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    Its a myth
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raps08-09 Champ View Post
    My dick is named 'Ewing'.

  3. #3
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    The religions are divided amongst the two parties based on which religions hate each other. There isn't really an ideological reasoning behind it. You are right that many of the religions on the "left" are fundamentalist and conservative specifically Islam. But the religious groups on the right hate them so they gravitate towards the left and they are welcomed there. Personally I want my political party to reject religious groups outright. But one thing that you have to give religious groups credit for, which is why they hold great sway over their chosen political party is that they show up when they are expected. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, whatever...which of course means they are much more likely than the average citizen to show up on a particular Tuesday in November.
    Think long and hard about why you respond to nonsense. Please!


  4. #4
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    The left is about religious freedom for all so long as it doesnít force others to adopt their policies and beliefs. Itís about co-habitation. The religious right is about morphing policy and laws to adopt their religious based views.

    The key is that many of those views donít have any power currently to push their religious views onto others through political policy. And if and when they did reach that point they would be opposed for overstepping the same as the religious right is. And even without political power, many of those whose adopt their policies are pushed back on from the left.

    But it doesnít mean you have to push against people who peacefully abide by said religions just because others donít.

    There are plenty of religious Christians on the left who believe in a separation of church and state and allowing others to enjoy a true religious freedom (different from what the right likes to push as Ďreligious freedomí).


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  5. #5
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    Yep. Iím perfectly happy to let people have their fairy tale. Just donít put it into my government.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbroncos78087 View Post
    Yep. Iím perfectly happy to let people have their fairy tale. Just donít put it into my government.
    People on both the left and right want to push their religion into the government, and people on the left and the right are fine with people doing whatever they want in their own lives.

    I think the Left/Right thing has moved more away from being religion specific in some ways and closer to religion than in the past in other ways.

  7. #7
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    I'd love to have religion out of politics, but I'm okay with it being in politicians.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoots View Post
    I'd love to have religion out of politics, but I'm okay with it being in politicians.
    I think most well reasoned people would be okay with that. I donít see people demanding that politicians be atheist. They just donít want them using the power that they hold to foist their religious views onto others or using their religious views to justify policy decisions. It can shape who you are, which in a way justifies, but actual religious theology shouldnít be used to justify policy or lack thereof.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoots View Post
    People on both the left and right want to push their religion into the government, and people on the left and the right are fine with people doing whatever they want in their own lives.

    I think the Left/Right thing has moved more away from being religion specific in some ways and closer to religion than in the past in other ways.
    Iím not sure Iím following this.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoots View Post
    People on both the left and right want to push their religion into the government, and people on the left and the right are fine with people doing whatever they want in their own lives.

    I think the Left/Right thing has moved more away from being religion specific in some ways and closer to religion than in the past in other ways.
    Perhaps, but nowhere near in equal numbers. Do not mistake 3 Muslim politicians pushing their religion into government as any kind of widespread agenda on Democrat's part.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoots View Post
    I've always heard "the Religious Right", but years ago it was talking about a portion of people on the right who were driven by their religion to support certain positions, but it didn't represent the whole right ... whereas now it seems if you are on the right you are always assumed to be religious, and to succeed on the right in politics you almost have to pander to that belief. To me the Religious Right was always kind of a crazy group.

    Meanwhile, other religions seem to have found a home on the left, even religions that have VERY conservative core beliefs. That I find very strange. The left seemed the side of scientists and educated questioners. It pre-dates Trump, but Trump certainly helped that line be drawn more clearly.

    If we go back to the 60s the left was a place where free-love and no rules found a home, and God did not. Can someone explain why this is happening? Or has it always been thus and it's just more obvious than it was?
    Youíre seeing Democrats and ďthe leftĒ as the same but they are not.


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeW-Star View Post
    I think most well reasoned people would be okay with that. I donít see people demanding that politicians be atheist.
    In fact, quite the opposite is true. Judging by past and current voting patterns (at least on the national level) voters for the most part actually demand that a candidate have a stated ó if not active ó connection to a mainstream religious tradition.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/...n-us-congress/

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crovash View Post
    In fact, quite the opposite is true. Judging by past and current voting patterns (at least on the national level) voters for the most part actually demand that a candidate have a stated ó if not active ó connection to a mainstream religious tradition.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/...n-us-congress/
    Haha thatís the disconnect here. I donít think anywhere near the majority of voters are well reasoned.


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crovash View Post
    In fact, quite the opposite is true. Judging by past and current voting patterns (at least on the national level) voters for the most part actually demand that a candidate have a stated ó if not active ó connection to a mainstream religious tradition.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/...n-us-congress/
    And yea, atheism is still a taboo for a politician. Most of the atheists in politics just feign being religious. Donald Trump is probably a shining example of that, he just does it so horribly (I.e the clip that Gmen posted).

    Fortunately that taboo appears to be fast dissipating relative to the past.


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeW-Star View Post
    And yea, atheism is still a taboo for a politician. Most of the atheists in politics just feign being religious. Donald Trump is probably a shining example of that, he just does it so horribly (I.e the clip that Gmen posted).
    Oh, yeah. But they still have to do the ďGod Bless AmericaĒ thing at the end of big speeches. Otherwise the sheep would bleat.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeW-Star View Post
    Fortunately that taboo appears to be fast dissipating relative to the past.
    I am not sure itís really happening, but if it is, I canít say I am upset about that.

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