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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by metswon69 View Post
    I wouldn't expect Keith Law to eat crow. He's too much of an *******. He's usually really good at what he does but in this case he was dead wrong.
    He's arrogant, but he is a good evaluator of talent.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claymation View Post
    I once had an exchange with Keith and finished the conversation saying, "I'm not the one working for a Mickey Mouse organization."
    you work for Disney?

  3. #18
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  4. #19
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    Yes, even in a season when home run numbers around the majors are at an all-time high, McNeil's power surge has been an eye-popping development.

    As one long-time scout told me on Thursday, "Anybody who tells you they saw this coming is probably trying to sell you a bridge somewhere. There's not a scout on the planet that predicted this. At best you saw him as a utility player."

    It's not only scouts who are flabbergasted. When McNeil hit his 20th Wednesday night with a Citi Field moon shot that Statcast measured at 444 feet, long-distance expert Pete Alonso wasn't buying it.

    "When they put it on the scoreboard Pete was laughing," McNeil told reporters." He was like, 'there's no way.' I was giving him a hard time: I go, 'yeah, I got that.' "

    The disbelief is understandable. Never mind college, as recently as 2015, McNeil hit only one home run over 545 plate appearances in the Class-A and Double-A minors.

    Major injuries the next two seasons prompted him to add weight and strength to his 6-foot-1 frame, and the power has followed, reaching a new level the last couple of months, as McNeil has hit 13 home runs since July 14, despite missing 10 days due to a hamstring strain.

    McNeil has talked about standing taller at the plate, as advised by hitting coach Chili Davis, but one scout noticed he's moved closer to the plate as well in recent days, perhaps as a response to a mini-slump that saw him trying to pull everything and regularly grounding out to the right side.

    "Instead of hooking the ball on the ground," the scout said, "he's meeting it out in front because he moved closer to the plate, and he's hitting it in the air."

    Sounds something like what Daniel Murphy did in 2015, under the tutelage of Kevin Long, when he transformed himself into more of a slugger and for a few years became one of the most productive hitters in baseball.

    "Murphy moved up on the plate so he could pull the ball in the air, even the outside pitch," one scout said. "And that's what McNeil is doing right now."

    "Murphy was still quick enough to get to the ball inside, and that's the key because pitchers see a guy up on the plate and they're going to try to bust him in. McNeil will have to adjust to that, but his hands are really quick so he should be able to handle it.

    "The only question is if he falls in love with the home run and he becomes less of an elite contact hitter by selling out for power. That could cost him in batting average, but he's got such great hand-eye coordination that I think he'll always be able to adjust."

    That bears watching, to be sure, as McNeil has hit .285 in the second half of the season, compared to .349 in the first half. Even so, the power obviously brings greater production, as evidenced by a better OPS., 951 to .917, mostly because his slugging average has jumped significantly.

    Finally, if Murphy is the model, well, the additional power sure didn't harm his batting average. After his Ruthian-like 2015 postseason for the Mets, Murphy posted the two highest averages of his career, .348 and .322, with the Nationals in 2016 and '17 while also having his best power years -- 25 and 23 home runs, respectively.

    By then Murphy was in his 30s while McNeil, despite a relatively late start to his big-league career, is 27 and apparently still ascending.

    "I think he can hit for power and still hit around .330," one scout said. "He's that skilled in recognizing pitches and putting the bat on the ball in any part of the strike zone."

    So after all the talk of McNeil as a future batting champion, perhaps the power will make him an MVP candidate in years to come, as it did for Murphy, who finished second to Kris Bryant in 2016.

    On the other hand, as much as scouts love McNeil, they caution that they need to see if MLB reacts to the over-the-top home run totals this season and makes sure the baseballs aren't flying like golf balls in 2020.

    Even in that context, however, McNeil's 13 home runs in 45 second-half games make the case that he's still just tapping into his newfound power, offering all sorts of intrigue as to exactly how dynamic a hitter he'll be over the next few seasons.

    Whatever that finished product turns out to be, the Mets' scouts deserve credit for taking a shot with a skinny, slap-hitting college infielder. But as they were reminded by their recent visit to Long Beach State, where McNeil never hit a ball over the fence, there are some things that nobody can predict.


    SNY

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claymation View Post
    He's arrogant, but he is a good evaluator of talent.
    But he missed on McNeill. Why?
    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly.” -- Teddy Roosevelt

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dugmet View Post
    But he missed on McNeill. Why?
    Because he is stubborn and has preconceived notions

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dugmet View Post
    But he missed on McNeill. Why?
    Ask him on twitter if you don't have his email address.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  8. #23
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    We already know his answer.

    He felt McNeil was an older player who was feasting on younger competition when he was having his breakout year last year.

  9. #24
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    I don't know why, but what you are proposing could possibly the case.

    Some so called experts have missed on quite a few prospects, and plenty on this forum.
    I still think Law is a good talent evaluator.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaMetFan View Post
    Would have been great to have him and Murphy in the lineup every day.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    What? Have two good hitters hitting in the lineup at the same time and especially when both can hit in the clutch? We can't have that!!! :P
    Last edited by mookiewilson; 09-16-2019 at 01:56 PM.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sick Of It All View Post
    We already know his answer.

    He felt McNeil was an older player who was feasting on younger competition when he was having his breakout year last year.
    A great scout looks at the player and sees the talent regardless of the competition or the stat sheet.
    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly.” -- Teddy Roosevelt

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dugmet View Post
    A great scout looks at the player and sees the talent regardless of the competition or the stat sheet.
    Listen, he is a somewhat solid evaluator, I don’t take anything he says as gospel. I don’t take anything anybody says about prospects as gospel.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sick Of It All View Post
    Listen, he is a somewhat solid evaluator, I don’t take anything he says as gospel. I don’t take anything anybody says about prospects as gospel.
    Difficult to imagine he is out on the road "scouting" every player in person. If there's limited video available to him, at some point (most of the time?) he's probably leaning on a spreadsheet and prone to making assumptions.
    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly.” -- Teddy Roosevelt

  14. #29
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    For Amateur Scouting Law attends all the big events. So he does have a bit of 1st hand information on the bigger prospects. Because he works for one of the biggest sports outlet he is privy to more video than some of the smaller outlets.

    The biggest offender to what you are describing is John Sickels, but you can say that with all the big sites, including Baseball America. Who rely heavily on team scouts.

    The one thing that Dug and Law have in common is that they both like Dominic Smith better than Pete Alonso. So there's that.


    "You don't know how to drink. Your whole generation, you drink for the wrong reasons. My generation, we drink because it's good, because it feels better than unbuttoning your collar, because we deserve it. We drink because it's what men do."

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claymation View Post
    The one thing that Dug and Law have in common is that they both like Dominic Smith better than Pete Alonso. So there's that.
    That's not accurate. So there's that.
    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly.” -- Teddy Roosevelt

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