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Thread: Euthanasia

  1. #1
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    Euthanasia

    I’m not sure if this belongs here in religion or in the politics section (maybe a little of both).

    Anyway, I read recently of a 104-year-old man Australian citizen (David Goodall, himself a scientist) who chose to end his life even though he had no obvious terminal illness. Since euthanasia in the form of “assisted suicide” is not legal in his home country, Dr. Goodall chose to fly to Switzerland to accomplish his intent.

    Several US states have “right-to-die” statutes on the books, but only in the case of terminal illness.

    Religious groups generally have opposed these laws.

    I guess my question is whether society should allow this form of death.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.fc9871047bac

  2. #2
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    Short answer: Yes, society should allow this form of death.,

    But the issue is much more complicated, hence the need for a short and a long answer.

    Once you make assisted suicide legal, you open the door for all kinds of potential abuses, the most obvious being committed by people who have a financial interest in someone dying. But that's a hurdle society should be able to leap given the proper oversight and regulation. But it is nonetheless a very scary concern here.
    "Ain't got the call no more. Got a lot of sinful idears – but they seem kinda sensible...."

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by fanofclendennon View Post
    Short answer: Yes, society should allow this form of death.,

    But the issue is much more complicated, hence the need for a short and a long answer.

    Once you make assisted suicide legal, you open the door for all kinds of potential abuses, the most obvious being committed by people who have a financial interest in someone dying. But that's a hurdle society should be able to leap given the proper oversight and regulation. But it is nonetheless a very scary concern here.
    The economic concern is, naturally, very real, and would dictate that this be a political question first and foremost.

    I put it here because I am interested in whether there are religious objections.

    Personally, I agree with you — also, however, with the same trepidation.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crovash View Post
    The economic concern is, naturally, very real, and would dictate that this be a political question first and foremost.

    I put it here because I am interested in whether there are religious objections.

    Personally, I agree with you — also, however, with the same trepidation.
    Unless you disagree with the premise of Separation of Church and State -- the basis of the establishment clause in the US Constitution's First Amendment, this cannot be a religious question.

    Now, it's entirely different if you feel you can never opt for assisted suicide based on your own religious beliefs. But you should never be able to deny anyone else based on these beliefs.

    Or at least i would hope not.
    "Ain't got the call no more. Got a lot of sinful idears – but they seem kinda sensible...."

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by fanofclendennon View Post
    Unless you disagree with the premise of Separation of Church and State -- the basis of the establishment clause in the US Constitution's First Amendment, this cannot be a religious question.

    Now, it's entirely different if you feel you can never opt for assisted suicide based on your own religious beliefs. But you should never be able to deny anyone else based on these beliefs.

    Or at least i would hope not.
    From a legislative point of view, you are correct. However, religious sentiments have a lot to do with what ultimately gets legislated (often too much, in my opinion).

    I’m asking whether this is (like abortion) a hot potato in the religious world — of which I am not really a part. Do religious organizations oppose this kind of euthanasia?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crovash View Post
    From a legislative point of view, you are correct. However, religious sentiments have a lot to do with what ultimately gets legislated (often too much, in my opinion).

    I’m asking whether this is (like abortion) a hot potato in the religious world — of which I am not really a part. Do religious organizations oppose this kind of euthanasia?
    Would love to hear from a theist but I'd think that absolutely, the religious community would have a big problem with anyone other than God ending a life.
    "Ain't got the call no more. Got a lot of sinful idears – but they seem kinda sensible...."

  7. #7
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    If I became terminally ill, my plan was to get a small boat, go a couple of miles off shore, sit on the edge and shoot myself in the head so the fishes could eat me. But now that Im married, if the wife is still alive I dont think that plan would fly.

    The comedian Doug Stanhope does a bit about how he slipped his mother a morphine overdose. He says the statute of limitations is up so he can talk about it publicly.


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    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly.” -- Teddy Roosevelt

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dugmet View Post
    If I became terminally ill, my plan was to get a small boat, go a couple of miles off shore, sit on the edge and shoot myself in the head so the fishes could eat me. But now that Im married, if the wife is still alive I dont think that plan would fly.

    The comedian Doug Stanhope does a bit about how he slipped his mother a morphine overdose. He says the statute of limitations is up so he can talk about it publicly.


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    There’s no statute of limitations for murder. Credit card fraud, yes.

    How is this even funny?

    https://youtu.be/WJ1Ky7xpnPM

  9. #9
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    Euthanasia

    Quote Originally Posted by fanofclendennon View Post
    There’s no statute of limitations for murder. Credit card fraud, yes.

    How is this even funny?

    https://youtu.be/WJ1Ky7xpnPM
    Doug Stanhope is not your typical comedian to be sure. It’s an incredible set of dark humor.


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    Last edited by Dugmet; 05-24-2018 at 05:56 PM.
    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly.” -- Teddy Roosevelt

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fanofclendennon View Post
    There’s no statute of limitations for murder. Credit card fraud, yes.

    How is this even funny?

    https://youtu.be/WJ1Ky7xpnPM
    I find it quite funny.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewing View Post
    I find it quite funny.
    to each his own.
    "Ain't got the call no more. Got a lot of sinful idears – but they seem kinda sensible...."

  12. #12
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    I guess I just wonder:

    Look, we declare war on someone, and all of a sudden, we don’t care all that much whether we are taking a life or whether God is taking the life.

    So, what’s the big deal?

    I’m all for euthanasia in theory. I do question, however, whether I could do it.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crovash View Post
    I guess I just wonder:

    Look, we declare war on someone, and all of a sudden, we don’t care all that much whether we are taking a life or whether God is taking the life.

    So, what’s the big deal?

    I’m all for euthanasia in theory. I do question, however, whether I could do it.
    Yeah. I feel the same way about the death penalty. Theoretically, it makes perfect sense. Someone takes a life in cold blood, he deserves to have his life taken, similarly. The problem, of course, is to trust our very flawed justice system to get the death penalty right EVERY time. See, if it's the state that'd doing the killing, even one mistake is way too much. The state cannot take innocent lives just because they were unable to properly identify the the guilty ones.

    In the case of legally assisted suicide, the system could be maniulated so that an willful life could be taken by someone with a financial motive and made to look like cooperative suicide.

    Don't trust it.
    "Ain't got the call no more. Got a lot of sinful idears – but they seem kinda sensible...."

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