Like us on Facebook


Follow us on Twitter





View Poll Results: Which of the remaining players was best at their peak?

Voters
12. You may not vote on this poll
  • Julius Erving

    1 8.33%
  • David Robinson

    4 33.33%
  • Chris Paul

    2 16.67%
  • Bill Russell

    0 0%
  • Karl Malone

    5 41.67%
  • Patrick Ewing

    0 0%
  • Jason Kidd

    0 0%
  • Steve Nash

    0 0%
  • Grant Hill

    0 0%
  • Rick Barry

    0 0%
  • Kevin McHale

    0 0%
  • Kawhi Leonard

    0 0%
  • James Harden

    0 0%
  • Isiah Thomas

    0 0%
  • Gary Payton

    0 0%
  • Another Player (Please Specify)

    0 0%
Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 92
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    27,083
    Quote Originally Posted by Chronz:32221075
    Quote Originally Posted by KnicksorBust View Post
    But I don't care. It is not about his legacy. I don't care about his clutchness. He is the best player on the board. How many mvp and dpoy are left?
    You mentioned legacy. Drob ain't doing **** even with Stockton
    20 years with Stockton and he aint doing ****? I disagree. Stockton would have made him.better and he was an mvp dpoy on his own.
    Last edited by KnicksorBust; 03-12-2018 at 10:21 PM.


    Kristaps Porzingis
    Stronger than most 15 year old girls.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    27,083
    Quote Originally Posted by Chronz:32221078
    Quote Originally Posted by KnicksorBust View Post
    Cant believe drob didnt win with sean elliot or ewing didnt win with starks. Karl malone choking repeatedly in the finals with stockton and hornacek is so much better.
    Also. Drob himself would be less effective today, why not vote Stockton if you feel he's better than cp3, which he ain't
    "Based on what doe?"


    Kristaps Porzingis
    Stronger than most 15 year old girls.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    35,238
    Hey KoB, do you really think Stockton would be better than CP3 in today's league?



  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    parts unknown
    Posts
    32,204

    Best Player of All-Time At Their Peak (#22)

    Quote Originally Posted by KnicksorBust View Post
    But I don't care. It is not about his legacy. I don't care about his clutchness. He is the best player on the board. How many mvp and dpoy are left?
    I really donít care about his awards. Thatís trivia. I care about who is the best player. When Iím in a close game my best player has to make plays. He also has to play better when his team needs him more. D Rob certainly didnít do those things. He should get downgraded accordingly

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by ewing; 03-12-2018 at 11:30 PM.
    Rep Power: 0




    Quote Originally Posted by Raps08-09 Champ View Post
    My dick is named 'Ewing'.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    17,227
    Did you guys see what happened in 96 when D-Rob was injured compared to the year before when he was healthy?

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    parts unknown
    Posts
    32,204
    Quote Originally Posted by ewing View Post
    I really donít care about his awards. Thatís trivia. I care about who is the best player. When Iím in a close game my best player has to make plays. He also has to play better when his team needs him more. D Rob certainly didnít do those things. Losing is ok shrinking is not. He should get downgraded accordingly

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Rep Power: 0




    Quote Originally Posted by Raps08-09 Champ View Post
    My dick is named 'Ewing'.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,023
    Not gonna vote. This is a joke. The most valuable player of all time, with no possible question, is't even on the list. Bill Russell. The two greatest "fire in the belly" players I've ever seen were Michael Jordan and Bill Russell. They were the two players I've seen who simply weren't going to allow their team to win. Russell was without question the greatest defensive player in the history of the game as well as the greatest rebounder in the history of the game. If you saw Dennis Rodman at his absolute peak, if you could imagine him on super steroids, that was Russell. He controlled nearly every game he was in through his defense. The best outlet passer I've ever seen. A freakishly great shot blocker. No one that I know of who saw him play much would even dream of putting either Bill Walton at his peak or Kareem at his peak above Russell. To this day, if I had to build a winning NBA team, Bill Russell would be THE FIRST PLAYER I would choose for my team, over Chamberlain, over Jordan, over Lebron. And to make it really, really clear, I hated the effing Celtics. They were unbeatable, and Russell was the reason that they were so dominant. He played thirteen seasons and won eleven rings. There was no MVP award during his career, but if their had been, he would have been the MVP around 9 or 10 times. He absolutely dominated Chamberlain in their match ups. Any list without Russell in at least the top 2 or 3 spots has any validity.

    And no Elgin Baylor? If we are talking "at their peak" - and for Baylor that was about a five year period, before a devastating knee injury - Baylor was unquestionably one of the 3 or 4 players who be part of that discussion. I get it. It is an age thing. If you haven't been watching basketball for more than a couple of decades you might not fully grasp who Baylor was. Put it this way: at the end of his life Red Auerbach still believed Elgin Baylor was the best forward he had ever seen. Not Larry Bird. Elgin Baylor. I think you can make a very strong case for Baylor being a better offensive player prior to his knee injury than Michael Jordan. And he had the numbers to prove it. Just before his knee injury - and what happened was that he suffered significant torn cartilage as well he knee injury breaking into three separate pieces -

    I know one of the standard excuses for rejecting players from the sixties. Basketball allegedly wasn't as competitive. That is hogwash. It was far more competitive then than now. The talent gap does not exist. Most of my playing was in the seventies and eighties, and I've seen nothing in players today to make me think that there is a talent gap. I tried to base my jump shot (I was a very good shooter and I really regret that there wasn't a three point shot line) on Dave Bing, who played most of his career with Detroit. Despite major eye problems, he was a deadly outside shooter. Maybe the best baseline jump shot I've ever seen. Two reasons that it was harder to score then: first, hand checking. Defensive players could really slam offensive players then. Charging was called far more frequently. If Baylor had played with the kind of limitations on what you could do with your hands, he'd probably have average over 40 a game. Second, the talent pool today is incredibly watered down because of a combo of the merger of the NBA and the ABA and extensive expansion. You have at least three times as many players in the league today than in the sixties. So the talent level was actually higher than it is today. There are a lot of starters today who probably couldn't have made any NBA team in the sixties.

    If you didn't see Baylor, go check out some highlight reels. He was, along with Jordan, the most freakishly athletic player in the history of the game. They fudged his size and weight for much of his career, but he was probably around 6'5, 230 for most of his career. What made him impossible to guard was a combo of extreme athleticism, incredibly quickness, amazing physical strength, and surreal leaping ability. If you think about "hang time," Baylor had it as much as Jordan, and perhaps more. One of his patented moves was to drive the baseline, jump up while outside the lane, and try to lay the ball in. If anyone challenged the ball, he would use the rim to screen their hands away, and he would curl his hand back and dunk in on the side opposite of where he started off. I saw him do that at least a dozen times. He is the only player in the history of the NBA that I believe could do that routinely. Dr. J did the same play, only spinning the ball off the backboard, and people consider it the greatest play in his career. Baylor did the same play, only dunking it instead. Red Auerbach always spoke of Baylor in superlatives: the greatest forward in the history of the NBA, the strongest forward he ever saw, the quickest player he ever saw, the greatest jumper he ever saw, the most unstoppable offensive player he ever saw. He had elevated his game to the point where he was averaging 38 points a game and 19 rebounds a game. After the knee injury, he dropped to someone who would average 26 points a game and 12 rebounds a game. Still a very, very good player, but not the GOAT like he was prior to the injury.

    Another thing about Baylor was the sheer variety of ways that he could score. His bread and butter was driving to the basket, trying to create a three point play by getting fouled on a lay up. Despite his hang time, he rarely dunked, except when using the rim to keep players from blocking his shot. He had a spectacular finger roll, a surprisingly effective jump hook, which he shot with either hand, an excellent jump shot, and he was the only player I've ever seen who would consistently drive to the basket, then turn his back to the rim as he jumped, flipping the ball backwards over his head, a no look shot that went into the hole far more often than you could imagine it should. He was one of the greatest offensive rebounders ever, in the Moses Malone class, so frequently if he missed, he could just put back up his own shot.

    But here is the main thing: if you take NBA star players who are old enough to have seen Baylor and who have seen all the players who came afterwards, they nonetheless still consider Baylor to be the best forward ever. I'd bet you money that if you polled the NBA HOF players, Baylor would get their vote for best small forward of all time (though technically he was a power forward - size wise you'd think he was a SF, but he was stronger than the big power forwards, so that with his strength and quickness, no one could come close to handling him.) Think of it this way. Imagine a player about the size of Charles Barkley who was significantly stronger, had 10 inches more on his vertical, and had the quickness and body control of Michael Jordan, and you have Elgin Baylor. But like I said, if you doubt this, hit Youtube and just randomly watch a few highlight reels.



    Now for a confession: I keep saying that he had as much body control as Michael Jordan, but that is a lie. I actually think he had better body control. One reason I feel free to say this is because I just found a particularly good highlight reel, one that really does encapsulate the player I remember. In the sixties you couldn't watch endless amounts of basketball, but I watched every game I could. Then living in Chicago from 1981 until 2013, I watched as much Michael Jordan as I could. But I never really thought that Jordan was quite as athletic as Baylor. I do think he had that "fire in the belly" that I mentioned above. But they are clearly the two most athletic players I ever watched.

    I could go on. Take Rick Barry. He is better than several players on that list. And where is Julius Erving? Are you kidding me? You have Tracy McGrady, who isn't even a good player, on the list, but no Erving? Or going back to the fifties, Bob Pettit. Pettit was better than Barkley, far better than Wade, better than Durant. I mean, look at his stats. He was a phenomenal rebounder. Bob Pettit is definitely the greatest player in the history of the game that people today have never heard of. But he went up against Russell, Chamberlain, Baylor, West, Robertson, and so on, and would often have games where he would score 38 points and pull down 26 rebounds.

    And why no John Havlicek on the list? Why no Nate Archibald? What I am really complaining about is the lack of perspective that fan have today. That doesn't happen with serious baseball fans. Baseball fans all know about Ted Williams and Mickey Mantle and Walter Johnson, but today's basketball fans don't grasp how good Oscar Robertson and Baylor and Jerry West were. Or if today's fans could watch Earl Monroe play. Just an amazing one on one player. Or the tragedy that was Connie Hawkins, who might have been as good as anyone, but was banned from the NBA for years for a point shaving controversy in which he almost definitely played no role. Fans today might know a lot about Pete Maravich, but might not grasp that he wasn't really a great basketball player, despite his freakishly great skills (he wasn't a good defensive player, his passes were so creative that his teammates couldn't always catch them, and his style was disruptive to team flow - the mark of truly great players like Bill Russell and Michael Jordan is that they make their teammates better players). Or how much do people know now about Wes Unseld and Elvin Hayes? Unseld was a dominant center despite being only around 6'6 and not having any scoring ability. But he was significantly wider than Charles Barkley, was incredibly strong, a great rebounder despite not being a great leaper, and a really great passer. No one knows if Hayes was a good or bad passer because he never attempted one (this is a joke - he did pass, he just didn't pass much). But he was a great offensive player, with one of the best fade aways in NBA history, was a tremendous rebounder, and a good defensive player. How many people today remember Dave Bing? Or Satch Sanders, who was Dennis Rodman without the antics (maybe a better defensive forward than Rodman, not as good of a rebounder, but a slightly better scorer - still, they are all in all very, very good forwards whose value to a team never showed up in the points scored column). Basketball didn't begin with Dr. J or Larry Bird or Michael Jordan. It didn't even begin with Kareem or Wilt Chamberlain. I think Bob Pettit and Bob Cousy were the first players to come along who could also be great players today. Cousy was John Stockton before John Stockton. He was the first player to really open up the game in the open court. He invented the behind the back dribble and pass. There is a huge difference between basketball as it was played in 1965 and the way it was played in 1955, but there isn't that much of a difference between the 1965 game and the 2015 game, except for changes to make it easier for people to score. The game used to be far more physical. The other major difference, of course, is the 3 point shot, which we got from the merger with the ABA. A lot of the players from the sixties would have been excellent three point shooters. Baylor certainly would have been. Jerry West. Definitely Dave Bing. Gail Goodrich and Bill Sharman, two players most today have never heard of (Sharman is one of the elite free throw shooters of all time)

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    35,238
    Holy text



  9. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    27,083
    Quote Originally Posted by Shammyguy3 View Post
    Hey KoB, do you really think Stockton would be better than CP3 in today's league?
    Why not? He had a season where he averaged 17ppg / 15 apg / 3 spg all-nba defensive team and he didn't even shoot 1 three point shot per game. He is a career 38.4% shooter from 3pt. He and Mark Price just played in the wrong era. He is the ultimate table setter. Would love to have him on my team. Plus he's way more clutch than Chris Paul.


    Kristaps Porzingis
    Stronger than most 15 year old girls.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    27,083
    Quote Originally Posted by ewing View Post
    I really donít care about his awards. Thatís trivia. I care about who is the best player. When Iím in a close game my best player has to make plays. He also has to play better when his team needs him more. D Rob certainly didnít do those things. He should get downgraded accordingly

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yeah they usually don't give MVPs and DPOYs to the best players. huh.

    Your viewpoint is so old school. WHO CARES ABOUT CLOSE GAMES? Was it you who I brought up Curry? His 1st MVP season was one of the greatest seasons of all-time and he didn't have to step-up his game in the 4th quarter because he was sitting on the bench watching his teammates close out a blowout win.


    Kristaps Porzingis
    Stronger than most 15 year old girls.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    27,083
    Quote Originally Posted by WhosisKid View Post
    Not gonna vote. This is a joke. The most valuable player of all time, with no possible question, is't even on the list. Bill Russell. The two greatest "fire in the belly" players I've ever seen were Michael Jordan and Bill Russell. They were the two players I've seen who simply weren't going to allow their team to win. Russell was without question the greatest defensive player in the history of the game as well as the greatest rebounder in the history of the game. If you saw Dennis Rodman at his absolute peak, if you could imagine him on super steroids, that was Russell. He controlled nearly every game he was in through his defense. The best outlet passer I've ever seen. A freakishly great shot blocker. No one that I know of who saw him play much would even dream of putting either Bill Walton at his peak or Kareem at his peak above Russell. To this day, if I had to build a winning NBA team, Bill Russell would be THE FIRST PLAYER I would choose for my team, over Chamberlain, over Jordan, over Lebron. And to make it really, really clear, I hated the effing Celtics. They were unbeatable, and Russell was the reason that they were so dominant. He played thirteen seasons and won eleven rings. There was no MVP award during his career, but if their had been, he would have been the MVP around 9 or 10 times. He absolutely dominated Chamberlain in their match ups. Any list without Russell in at least the top 2 or 3 spots has any validity.

    And no Elgin Baylor? If we are talking "at their peak" - and for Baylor that was about a five year period, before a devastating knee injury - Baylor was unquestionably one of the 3 or 4 players who be part of that discussion. I get it. It is an age thing. If you haven't been watching basketball for more than a couple of decades you might not fully grasp who Baylor was. Put it this way: at the end of his life Red Auerbach still believed Elgin Baylor was the best forward he had ever seen. Not Larry Bird. Elgin Baylor. I think you can make a very strong case for Baylor being a better offensive player prior to his knee injury than Michael Jordan. And he had the numbers to prove it. Just before his knee injury - and what happened was that he suffered significant torn cartilage as well he knee injury breaking into three separate pieces -

    I know one of the standard excuses for rejecting players from the sixties. Basketball allegedly wasn't as competitive. That is hogwash. It was far more competitive then than now. The talent gap does not exist. Most of my playing was in the seventies and eighties, and I've seen nothing in players today to make me think that there is a talent gap. I tried to base my jump shot (I was a very good shooter and I really regret that there wasn't a three point shot line) on Dave Bing, who played most of his career with Detroit. Despite major eye problems, he was a deadly outside shooter. Maybe the best baseline jump shot I've ever seen. Two reasons that it was harder to score then: first, hand checking. Defensive players could really slam offensive players then. Charging was called far more frequently. If Baylor had played with the kind of limitations on what you could do with your hands, he'd probably have average over 40 a game. Second, the talent pool today is incredibly watered down because of a combo of the merger of the NBA and the ABA and extensive expansion. You have at least three times as many players in the league today than in the sixties. So the talent level was actually higher than it is today. There are a lot of starters today who probably couldn't have made any NBA team in the sixties.

    If you didn't see Baylor, go check out some highlight reels. He was, along with Jordan, the most freakishly athletic player in the history of the game. They fudged his size and weight for much of his career, but he was probably around 6'5, 230 for most of his career. What made him impossible to guard was a combo of extreme athleticism, incredibly quickness, amazing physical strength, and surreal leaping ability. If you think about "hang time," Baylor had it as much as Jordan, and perhaps more. One of his patented moves was to drive the baseline, jump up while outside the lane, and try to lay the ball in. If anyone challenged the ball, he would use the rim to screen their hands away, and he would curl his hand back and dunk in on the side opposite of where he started off. I saw him do that at least a dozen times. He is the only player in the history of the NBA that I believe could do that routinely. Dr. J did the same play, only spinning the ball off the backboard, and people consider it the greatest play in his career. Baylor did the same play, only dunking it instead. Red Auerbach always spoke of Baylor in superlatives: the greatest forward in the history of the NBA, the strongest forward he ever saw, the quickest player he ever saw, the greatest jumper he ever saw, the most unstoppable offensive player he ever saw. He had elevated his game to the point where he was averaging 38 points a game and 19 rebounds a game. After the knee injury, he dropped to someone who would average 26 points a game and 12 rebounds a game. Still a very, very good player, but not the GOAT like he was prior to the injury.

    Another thing about Baylor was the sheer variety of ways that he could score. His bread and butter was driving to the basket, trying to create a three point play by getting fouled on a lay up. Despite his hang time, he rarely dunked, except when using the rim to keep players from blocking his shot. He had a spectacular finger roll, a surprisingly effective jump hook, which he shot with either hand, an excellent jump shot, and he was the only player I've ever seen who would consistently drive to the basket, then turn his back to the rim as he jumped, flipping the ball backwards over his head, a no look shot that went into the hole far more often than you could imagine it should. He was one of the greatest offensive rebounders ever, in the Moses Malone class, so frequently if he missed, he could just put back up his own shot.

    But here is the main thing: if you take NBA star players who are old enough to have seen Baylor and who have seen all the players who came afterwards, they nonetheless still consider Baylor to be the best forward ever. I'd bet you money that if you polled the NBA HOF players, Baylor would get their vote for best small forward of all time (though technically he was a power forward - size wise you'd think he was a SF, but he was stronger than the big power forwards, so that with his strength and quickness, no one could come close to handling him.) Think of it this way. Imagine a player about the size of Charles Barkley who was significantly stronger, had 10 inches more on his vertical, and had the quickness and body control of Michael Jordan, and you have Elgin Baylor. But like I said, if you doubt this, hit Youtube and just randomly watch a few highlight reels.



    Now for a confession: I keep saying that he had as much body control as Michael Jordan, but that is a lie. I actually think he had better body control. One reason I feel free to say this is because I just found a particularly good highlight reel, one that really does encapsulate the player I remember. In the sixties you couldn't watch endless amounts of basketball, but I watched every game I could. Then living in Chicago from 1981 until 2013, I watched as much Michael Jordan as I could. But I never really thought that Jordan was quite as athletic as Baylor. I do think he had that "fire in the belly" that I mentioned above. But they are clearly the two most athletic players I ever watched.

    I could go on. Take Rick Barry. He is better than several players on that list. And where is Julius Erving? Are you kidding me? You have Tracy McGrady, who isn't even a good player, on the list, but no Erving? Or going back to the fifties, Bob Pettit. Pettit was better than Barkley, far better than Wade, better than Durant. I mean, look at his stats. He was a phenomenal rebounder. Bob Pettit is definitely the greatest player in the history of the game that people today have never heard of. But he went up against Russell, Chamberlain, Baylor, West, Robertson, and so on, and would often have games where he would score 38 points and pull down 26 rebounds.

    And why no John Havlicek on the list? Why no Nate Archibald? What I am really complaining about is the lack of perspective that fan have today. That doesn't happen with serious baseball fans. Baseball fans all know about Ted Williams and Mickey Mantle and Walter Johnson, but today's basketball fans don't grasp how good Oscar Robertson and Baylor and Jerry West were. Or if today's fans could watch Earl Monroe play. Just an amazing one on one player. Or the tragedy that was Connie Hawkins, who might have been as good as anyone, but was banned from the NBA for years for a point shaving controversy in which he almost definitely played no role. Fans today might know a lot about Pete Maravich, but might not grasp that he wasn't really a great basketball player, despite his freakishly great skills (he wasn't a good defensive player, his passes were so creative that his teammates couldn't always catch them, and his style was disruptive to team flow - the mark of truly great players like Bill Russell and Michael Jordan is that they make their teammates better players). Or how much do people know now about Wes Unseld and Elvin Hayes? Unseld was a dominant center despite being only around 6'6 and not having any scoring ability. But he was significantly wider than Charles Barkley, was incredibly strong, a great rebounder despite not being a great leaper, and a really great passer. No one knows if Hayes was a good or bad passer because he never attempted one (this is a joke - he did pass, he just didn't pass much). But he was a great offensive player, with one of the best fade aways in NBA history, was a tremendous rebounder, and a good defensive player. How many people today remember Dave Bing? Or Satch Sanders, who was Dennis Rodman without the antics (maybe a better defensive forward than Rodman, not as good of a rebounder, but a slightly better scorer - still, they are all in all very, very good forwards whose value to a team never showed up in the points scored column). Basketball didn't begin with Dr. J or Larry Bird or Michael Jordan. It didn't even begin with Kareem or Wilt Chamberlain. I think Bob Pettit and Bob Cousy were the first players to come along who could also be great players today. Cousy was John Stockton before John Stockton. He was the first player to really open up the game in the open court. He invented the behind the back dribble and pass. There is a huge difference between basketball as it was played in 1965 and the way it was played in 1955, but there isn't that much of a difference between the 1965 game and the 2015 game, except for changes to make it easier for people to score. The game used to be far more physical. The other major difference, of course, is the 3 point shot, which we got from the merger with the ABA. A lot of the players from the sixties would have been excellent three point shooters. Baylor certainly would have been. Jerry West. Definitely Dave Bing. Gail Goodrich and Bill Sharman, two players most today have never heard of (Sharman is one of the elite free throw shooters of all time)
    I read this post twice because clearly you are like 60-70 years old and it was entertaining to read to hear you talk about players I've never seen live... but it's also so condescending, obnoxious, and misplaced. It started with two sentences that almost made me not want to continue. "Not gonna vote. This is a joke." What a hero! Thank you for taking a stand! You really proved a point that because an internet forum vote isn't going the way you like you will not participate!! That will solve the problem. Man if only you got involved in politics the world would be a better place. That's what we need. More people sitting on the sidelines complaining. Give me a break. You want Russell. Advocate for him. Don't write a book report waxing poetic on Earl Monroe and Connie Hawkins.


    Kristaps Porzingis
    Stronger than most 15 year old girls.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    27,083
    Quote Originally Posted by Shammyguy3 View Post
    Holy text
    My favorite post in a while if he didn't start with the "I'm not gonna vote" stuff. I read it in a different tone because of that. You know? Like "you fools, how dare you" instead of "let me tell you about some lost greats" which I would have enjoyed.


    Kristaps Porzingis
    Stronger than most 15 year old girls.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    17,227
    Quote Originally Posted by KnicksorBust View Post
    Why not? He had a season where he averaged 17ppg / 15 apg / 3 spg all-nba defensive team and he didn't even shoot 1 three point shot per game. He is a career 38.4% shooter from 3pt. He and Mark Price just played in the wrong era. He is the ultimate table setter. Would love to have him on my team. Plus he's way more clutch than Chris Paul.
    CP3 is a better player than Stockton by any metric you want to use. Passing is overrated in terms of APG for Stockton. He held onto the ball for every possession. The team ran through him and Malone. Was Stockton a better passer? They're both great passers. How is APG going to convince me otherwise when one guy pounded the ball every possession?

    All-NBA defensive team = which CP3 has consistently been a part of.
    All-NBA teams = CP3 always a part of.
    6x Steals leader = NBA record for CP3.

    I don't see how Stockton would be a better player. Stockton was one of the dirtiest players in the game as well.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    27,083
    Quote Originally Posted by FlashBolt View Post
    CP3 is a better player than Stockton by any metric you want to use. Passing is overrated in terms of APG for Stockton. He held onto the ball for every possession. The team ran through him and Malone. Was Stockton a better passer? They're both great passers. How is APG going to convince me otherwise when one guy pounded the ball every possession?

    All-NBA defensive team = which CP3 has consistently been a part of.
    All-NBA teams = CP3 always a part of.
    6x Steals leader = NBA record for CP3.

    I don't see how Stockton would be a better player. Stockton was one of the dirtiest players in the game as well.
    Then how come John Stockton's career season HIGH in usage percentage is still lower than Chris Paul's career season LOW in usage percentage?


    Kristaps Porzingis
    Stronger than most 15 year old girls.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    parts unknown
    Posts
    32,204

    Best Player of All-Time At Their Peak (#22)

    Quote Originally Posted by KnicksorBust View Post
    Yeah they usually don't give MVPs and DPOYs to the best players. huh.

    Your viewpoint is so old school. WHO CARES ABOUT CLOSE GAMES? Was it you who I brought up Curry? His 1st MVP season was one of the greatest seasons of all-time and he didn't have to step-up his game in the 4th quarter because he was sitting on the bench watching his teammates close out a blowout win.
    Did Curry close? I thought he lost in the finals. Anywho, I care and so should you. All these guys are great players. If you are comparing an MVP to guy who is the 7th or 8th man you can just look at numbers and awards. The numbers tell me D Rob was better then a lot of players. If Iím comparing him to another great player I have go deeper though. So should you. All you are doing is spouting trivia.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by ewing; 03-13-2018 at 12:07 PM.
    Rep Power: 0




    Quote Originally Posted by Raps08-09 Champ View Post
    My dick is named 'Ewing'.

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •