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  1. #1
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    Politico article on the Democratic Party

    https://www.politico.com/magazine/st...indiana-216273

    Thought this was a very good read about how the current Democratic Party is out of touch with the rural democrat voters


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  2. #2
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    Ha, just read this and was about to post it in here. Really good read.

  3. #3
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    Great article. Spot on in a lot of areas. I voted for Obama in 08. But I see a bleak future for the Democrats if the keep heading down this path of identity politics. A lot of democratic party platform issues are unacceptable to me right now.

  4. #4
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    Yep. Talk about health care, living wage, public education(and as importantly college costs) and they will make a lot of headway. Bustos is my congresswoman, bright and pragmatic.

  5. #5
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    They didnít deliver enough for the working class. No theyíre all talk when it comes to middle and lower class just like the GOP, but at least the GOP can say they saved them all tax dollars. Sure you can analyze the tax bill, deduction caps, long term effects, etc.....but you know who doesnít have time or ability to do that? Working class people. But they will sure notice an uptick on their paycheck.


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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGGGG-Men View Post
    They didnít deliver enough for the working class. No theyíre all talk when it comes to middle and lower class just like the GOP, but at least the GOP can say they saved them all tax dollars. Sure you can analyze the tax bill, deduction caps, long term effects, etc.....but you know who doesnít have time or ability to do that? Working class people. But they will sure notice an uptick on their paycheck.


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    Meh. Many see it as a corporate giveaway. They are skeptical that anything the feds do helps them. They assume they got screwed somehow. Itís literally how trump got elected.
    The article also does what many do when they refer to rural people. Find a guy who says something sensational and paint the whole of rural peoples with it. There are as many decent intelligent and informed republicans here as the racist xenophobic people. The belief that the whole of them fall in the former category is precisely the identity politics and elitism that Bustos is talking about. We donít need or want to chase the those votes, but we can win the votes of the reasonable people. Again, talk about single payer, they are clamoring for it. Talk about free in state college tuition, talk about getting money out of politics, talk about infrastructure. Quit falling into the abortion, gay rights, and terror traps and call it the distraction that it is. They are ripe for the picking.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGGGG-Men View Post
    But they will sure notice an uptick on their paycheck.


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    And they will sure notice the downtick that's timed into bill, and they will notice the drop in social welfare support if the R's achieve their wet dream of cutting more entitlements while the rich continue to rake in the dough from the "tax cut".
    I am not a con artist! I am a businessman! I have a big brain and I'm good at making deals! People are just jealous of my BIG BRAIN! BAD!

    Guess who? The future X-Presdent...

  8. #8
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    blah

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPoon
    man with hair like fire can destroy souls with a twitch of his thighs.

  9. #9
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    The electorate is hungry to escape the nonsense under Trump. The Dems can't get away just opposing it.

    They can borrow from the standard playbook of Clinton merged with Johnson. High tech, blue collars, women, urban, rural voters that are not married to "pro life" or racist beliefs. Obviously most R's won't join, but unlike Trump whichever D wins the Presidential election in 2020 will realize he/she governs the whole country not just the jerks that guffaw when Trump acts like a carnival barker.

    No to Oprah, no to Bernie, no the EW. Qualified, grounded, able to take all the Fox/Brietbart attacks. Biggest way this fails is if the Russians dial in the winner - obviously Trump if he is the nominee because he'll just weaken the US on the world stage as he already has.

    Remember the US has 7% of world GNP. The world doesn't revolve around D.C., we might be the first in line - but the term superpower outside of the military is starting to look rather threadbare. The huge reaction to his remarks yesterday are all over the place. Only donkeys with no brains think that this is a good thing.
    I am not a con artist! I am a businessman! I have a big brain and I'm good at making deals! People are just jealous of my BIG BRAIN! BAD!

    Guess who? The future X-Presdent...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagwell368 View Post
    And they will sure notice the downtick that's timed into bill, and they will notice the drop in social welfare support if the R's achieve their wet dream of cutting more entitlements while the rich continue to rake in the dough from the "tax cut".
    You're giving hard working people more credit on info they don't have time to deal with. And there's a good chance that by the time they need to cut other social programs, raise taxes to compensate for the deficit, etc. that Dems will be in charge and take the heat.

  11. #11
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    I mentioned this way back in another thread, but one of the things that has polarized US politics is the loss of the party wings* -- which in effect allowed for a much more dynamic quasi-four-party system.

    Now we have conservatives on one side, liberals on the other and centrists wannabes who on occasion might desire to, but don't dare to, step over the line because of the moronic way we run our primaries.

    *in addition to what we have now in the conservative republicans and the liberal democrats, there were conservative democrats (mostly midwest and south) and liberal republicans (largely in the northeast).
    Last edited by Crovash; 01-12-2018 at 04:27 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crovash View Post
    I mentioned this way back in another thread, but one of the things that has polarized US politics is the loss of the party wings* -- which in effect allowed for a much more dynamic quasi-four-party system.

    Now we have conservatives on one side, liberals on the other and centrists wannabes who on occasion might desire to, but don't dare to, step over the line because of the moronic way we run our primaries.

    *in addition to what we have now in the conservative republicans and the liberal democrats, there were conservative democrats (mostly midwest and south) and liberal republicans (largely in the northeast).
    It's a good point, but the civil rights act pretty much sorted all that out. I don't know that there's hope for wings, unless it's defined by a difference in social class v. establishment members of a party, but the establishment pretends to care about the working class, so they'll unite for the greater good politically.


    Honestly, I think our best hope for any extension beyond the two party system is Trump taking his based and House rep. supporters outside of the GOP into a new party and progressive democrats responding by splitting the Democratic party.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crovash View Post
    I mentioned this way back in another thread, but one of the things that has polarized US politics is the loss of the party wings* -- which in effect allowed for a much more dynamic quasi-four-party system.

    Now we have conservatives on one side, liberals on the other and centrists wannabes who on occasion might desire to, but don't dare to, step over the line because of the moronic way we run our primaries.

    *in addition to what we have now in the conservative republicans and the liberal democrats, there were conservative democrats (mostly midwest and south) and liberal republicans (largely in the northeast).
    The wings are alive and well. Hillary ignored the progressive wing of the party, so she lost. Trump successfully united the social conservatives with the corporate wing of his party, so he won.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by benny01 View Post
    The wings are alive and well. Hillary ignored the progressive wing of the party, so she lost. Trump successfully united the social conservatives with the corporate wing of his party, so he won.
    THe point might be that the wings aren't what they used to be. Now its degrees of liberalism in the Dem party and degrees of conservatism in the republican party. There used to be a liberal and conservative presence in each party.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGGGG-Men View Post
    THe point might be that the wings aren't what they used to be. Now its degrees of liberalism in the Dem party and degrees of conservatism in the republican party. There used to be a liberal and conservative presence in each party.
    Idk. I think that Jeb!!!! and Bernie represented those wings. I think that the tea partiers pulled the party right and had enough momentum to get their candidate nominated. The leaders of the Democratic Party thought that they could win by scooping up moderate republicans, so they rigged their primary so that the moderate won. They gambled and lost on both ends. They didnít get the moderates(due to a flawed candidate) and didnít embrace their base. They lost momentum and enthusiasm with the progressive wing and lost. I think that voters have always existed in all along the conservative and liberal spectrum. Obviously this is a pretty simplistic take

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