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  1. #1
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    ITT: Florida GOP Taking Another Shot At Killing Unions

    GOP = Corporations > People



    This Florida Stealth Offensive Against Unions Could Preview GOP Onslaught in 2018
    BY MICHAEL ARRIA


    Florida Republicans are pushing a bill designed to deal the state’s unions a death blow. House Bill 25, which was introduced by Longwood state Rep. Scott Plakon, would decertify any union in which 50 percent of the workers don’t pay dues, thus preventing them from being able to collectively bargain. Despite the fact that unions negotiate for the benefit of all their workers, no employee is forced to pay dues in Florida, because it’s a “Right to Work” state.

    Right to Work policies are purposely constructed to reduce the resources of organized labor, as many workers realize they can benefit from their union’s collective bargaining efforts without giving them any money. In practice, HB25 largely targets unions that lean left, exempting the few worker organizations that typically back the GOP: firefighter, police and corrections unions.

    This same exact move was just attempted by state Republicans. HB11 was the effectively the same bill, but it died during the 2017 legislative session in May. “This is divide and conquer … It’s an outright attack on labor unions,” Democratic Rep. Wengay Newton said at the time. “The right to bargain should be upheld and shouldn’t be interfered with.”

    Not only has the failed legislation been resurrected as HB25, but it’s been fast-tracked for a floor vote when the 2018 legislative session begins next month. Typically, bills need approval from multiple committees, but HB25 was assigned to just one panel: the Republican-controlled Government Accountability Committee. The bill easily passed 14-9, despite one Republican voting with the Democrats and activists protesting the action outside. Members of the committee received letters from Americans for Prosperity, the Koch-funded conservative advocacy group, urging them to vote for the bill.

    HB25 would disproportionately impact women employees, who make up the majority at the unions that would be targeted, while the previously mentioned male-dominated organizations would remain protected. This fact was brought up was brought up during the Government Accountability Committee by Democratic Rep. Kristen Jacobs. “I know you said that was not your intent,” Jacobs said to Plakon. “But when you look at the workers affected by this bill—over 80 percent are women. Now if you look at the unions exempted … they are largely made up of men.”

    The legislation could end collective bargaining for most teachers in the state, and Florida’s conservative lawmakers haven’t exactly concealed their disdain for the organizations. "The teachers' union is fixated on halting innovation and competition in education," said House Speaker Richard Corcoran during his swearing-in ceremony in 2016. “They are literally trying to destroy the lives of a hundred thousand children."

    United Teachers of Dade, Miami’s public teachers union, has between 13,000 and 14,000 members. But if stripped of their collective bargaining rights, they’d be unable to fight for the 30,000 teachers who work in the district. “HB25 is an unnecessary and destructive bill that targets women-dominated industries by seeking to eradicate their labor rights,” UTD president Karla Hernandez-Mats told In These Times. “There is a blatant disparate treatment being applied by the legislature between majority male and female professions and their unions, and it is unfortunate to see that our state lawmakers are attempting to move our country backwards instead of forward.”

    Florida’s unions are already up against the odds without HB25. Not only is Florida a Right to Work state, its constitution prohibits public employees from striking. Just how devastating could this bill be for labor? Its potential impact can be gleaned from Florida’s last Annual Workforce Report. Only 2.8 percent of AFSCME state employees and 7.9 percent of Florida Nurses Association members pay dues. Even the Police Benevolent Association, the strongest union in the state, would be decertified if the legislation applied to them. Only 45.7 percent of their members pay dues, just below the bill’s 50 percent threshold.

    The Trump administration has successfully stacked the National Labor Relations Board with pro-business forces, intervened against public employee unions in a landmark Supreme Court case, and moved to overturn the few labor victories that occurred under Obama. But what’s happening at a national level is taking place at an accelerated rate within various states. HB25 is reminiscent of a sweeping anti-union bill that was passed in Iowa at the beginning of 2017. That legislation stripped more than 100,000 workers of their collective bargaining rights and, just like Florida, the bill was fast-tracked and police unions were exempt. Nearly all of these bills are similar to Scott Walker’s infamous Act 10, the vast attack on organized labor in Wisconsin in 2011.

    If HB25 is successful, it could provide yet another blueprint for state lawmakers looking to crush organized labor in 2018.
    http://inthesetimes.com/working/entr...-women-workers



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  2. #2
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    Three cheers to the republicans over the last forty years, at the urging of big business, they have finally killed off the union power in this country. Florida might as well kiss their labor union good bye.

  3. #3
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    Thank god am in nyc.


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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sick Of It All View Post
    Thank god am in nyc.


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    Nice that some states see it as a good idea to protect workers.

  5. #5
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    No surprise here.

    There are (and always have been) those in the US who despise unionization. For the rich among that group, it's all about money; for the poor, maybe it's all about the myth of the rugged individualist. Now, in many cases, the unions contributed significantly to their own demise, but with the dawn of the Raygun era, the handwriting was on the wall and the 35-year dismantling of the unions ensued.

    This is why I don't really get why these same folks also seem vehemently to oppose immigrants (who, let's face it, do most of the menial jobs that are apparently beneath the dignity of the real citizens). The society want the services of these immigrants -- in fact, we demand their services -- and at the same time, is not this group the least likely to unionize?

  6. #6
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    They would not oppose immigrants if they were coming from Europe or Russians. go back and listen to Trump's campaign speeches on this.
    Last edited by WES445; 12-26-2017 at 01:20 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbroncos78087 View Post
    Nice that some states see it as a good idea to protect workers.
    Yeah, that is a dying trend.

  8. #8
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    I know a bunch of electricians that only believe in unions when they file unemployment or want medical benefits. They don’t really give a **** about other people’s rights. The big trade unions need to die so these asshats remember what they are for.

  9. #9
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    I work with guys who are in unions all of them and they went out and voted for trump. No these guys jobs were not being taken my illegals, they have annuities that in their life spans will net them between 500k and 1 million. Yet they voted for the party that wants to ban unions?


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  10. #10
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    And many of their kids are involved in the same thing just starting out.


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sick Of It All View Post
    I work with guys who are in unions all of them and they went out and voted for trump. No these guys jobs were not being taken my illegals, they have annuities that in their life spans will net them between 500k and 1 million. Yet they voted for the party that wants to ban unions?


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    It's a lot like the older folks in my town. Now that their children are safely through the very good public school system, they vote (almost as a block) against any improvements in it.

    In other words, they got theirs (just like the retired union guys) and to hell with the next ones in line.

    However you slice it, the haves will screw the not-haves (pun intended).

    Still, I trust a union a lot more than I trust a corporate board.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by benny01 View Post
    I know a bunch of electricians that only believe in unions when they file unemployment or want medical benefits. They don’t really give a **** about other people’s rights. The big trade unions need to die so these asshats remember what they are for.
    I’d rather see those guys take advantage than to see wealthy corporate owners take further advantage at the expense of rights to millions of working class.




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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGGGG-Men View Post
    I’d rather see those guys take advantage than to see wealthy corporate owners take further advantage at the expense of rights to millions of working class.




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    I support teachers unions. I’m off topic for the post.

    I think my issue is the take advantage part. The biggest problem that unions have is that many of the most powerful unions have been motivated solely by self interest. The members are fat and complacent. Until that changes, union are gonna be in trouble.

    Also, if you can’t/won’t strike, your not a union.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by WES445 View Post
    Three cheers to the republicans over the last forty years, at the urging of big business, they have finally killed off the union power in this country. Florida might as well kiss their labor union good bye.
    And good. Unions are largely useless today.

    100 years ago they served a fantastic purpose. Now they are nothing more than an inefficient business inside a business.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffy25 View Post
    And good. Unions are largely useless today.

    100 years ago they served a fantastic purpose. Now they are nothing more than an inefficient business inside a business.
    How do you counter the mirroring of union membership rates versus middle class income share? As union rates have fallen so have the share of income that goes to the middle class. If that income were going to the poor and they were becoming part of the middle class, that might be good. But let’s not pretend that’s where it is going.

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