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  1. #2116
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyi View Post
    What we need is a salary floor for tax purposes. The average MLB team payroll is $120 million, with 16 teams under it and 14 teams over it. Of those 16 teams under it, 3 teams are under $60 million, including the Phillies, Braves and White Sox. Amazingly, with all the selling off, the Marlins still haven't reached the level of those three teams. I believe that they should immediately raise the minimum payroll to $90 million (I'm just picking a number that is 3/4 of the average major league payroll). Anyone who falls under $90 million, in my scenario, gets their revenue sharing and MLB advertising dollars reduced by the amount under $90 million. This doesn't mean that you are forced to sign free agents to long-term deals. You could also pay your own players more money if no free agents suit you. The result might be to pay high performing pre-arbitration players on small market teams more money, if you cannot get a free agent on a short-term contract.
    I like it! Kinda what I was hinting at in earlier post. There should be a floor and penalties attached.

    According to Forbes, 2017 numbvers has the A's, Padres, Rays, Pirates and Brewers all under $90M. D-backs and Reds just $3M above $90M.
    “Farts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley
    "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts."--- Albert Einstein
    "If I had more time I would write more briefly."



  2. #2117
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyi View Post
    What we need is a salary floor for tax purposes. The average MLB team payroll is $120 million, with 16 teams under it and 14 teams over it. Of those 16 teams under it, 3 teams are under $60 million, including the Phillies, Braves and White Sox. Amazingly, with all the selling off, the Marlins still haven't reached the level of those three teams. I believe that they should immediately raise the minimum payroll to $90 million (I'm just picking a number that is 3/4 of the average major league payroll). Anyone who falls under $90 million, in my scenario, gets their revenue sharing and MLB advertising dollars reduced by the amount under $90 million. This doesn't mean that you are forced to sign free agents to long-term deals. You could also pay your own players more money if no free agents suit you. The result might be to pay high performing pre-arbitration players on small market teams more money, if you cannot get a free agent on a short-term contract.
    Why would MLB owners agree to institute a policy that forces their teams to spend money that makes some of their teams unprofitable and thus reducing the franchise value of that team and therefore the league as a whole?

    Fans like to think of it as each owner vs. the rest because that's how sports are competitively. But from an ownership perspective it's a business. They're all in it together to maximize the value of their league.


    NE Patriots Forum HOF (Class of 2011)

  3. #2118
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    Quote Originally Posted by hugepatsfan View Post
    Why would MLB owners agree to institute a policy that forces their teams to spend money that makes some of their teams unprofitable and thus reducing the franchise value of that team and therefore the league as a whole?

    Fans like to think of it as each owner vs. the rest because that's how sports are competitively. But from an ownership perspective it's a business. They're all in it together to maximize the value of their league.
    I have a feeling the larger market owners who pay more year in and out (as a percentage (31%) of their net local revs) into revenue sharing might feel differently. Spending money on your product is money well spent imo. The return on that investment would be well worth it.

    The 15 largest market teams are disqualified from receiving revenue shares as of 2016 regardless of revenues. Deck seems stacked against the large markets. There is also a disparity in the allocation of MLB’s central fund, monies acquired via national broadcasts, which are doled out based on revenue.

    If a team is forced into financial stress due to a minimum payroll, maybe they should be relocated to more profitable markets with a fan base that will support the team.
    Last edited by drt1010; 02-08-2018 at 08:08 PM.
    “Farts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley
    "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts."--- Albert Einstein
    "If I had more time I would write more briefly."



  4. #2119
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    Ponder this for a moment.

    According to Forbes, "The St. Louis Cardinals are baseball’s biggest anomaly," Forbes wrote. "Despite playing in one of the smallest markets, the Cardinals are MLB’s sixth-most valuable team, worth $1.4 billion. During the 19 seasons Bill DeWitt has owned them, the Cardinals have posted a winning record 16 times and have been in four World Series, winning the title in 2011 and 2006. Since moving into their new stadium in 2006 the team has never finished below sixth in attendance and has placed second the past two seasons. The Cardinals also pull in baseball’s highest local television ratings. And with Ballpark Village, the Cardinals have made the area near Busch Stadium a destination place people looking for dining and entertainment."

    Good product on the field, smart ownership, profits will follow regardless of market size. Winning matters and you don't win unless you spend developing good talent.
    “Farts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley
    "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts."--- Albert Einstein
    "If I had more time I would write more briefly."



  5. #2120
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    Quote Originally Posted by hugepatsfan View Post
    Why would MLB owners agree to institute a policy that forces their teams to spend money that makes some of their teams unprofitable and thus reducing the franchise value of that team and therefore the league as a whole?

    Fans like to think of it as each owner vs. the rest because that's how sports are competitively. But from an ownership perspective it's a business. They're all in it together to maximize the value of their league.
    I was suggesting this more as a solution and obviously it is the players that would be negotiating a floor, not the owners.

  6. #2121
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    Not to sound rude but don't you think these options have been discussed by both sides?
    I like the fact the owners aren't caving to the agents. Its time players and agents realize they are playing a game for a *****load of money . Players being worth 5 years and 125 million ? really ? I love baseball as much as the next person but this ***** has to stop . The Yankees , Red Sox , Dodgers or Cubs are going to pay Harper and Machado sick money . Like somebody said a while back. How does somebody take a family of four to a game even once a year ? And still sit in noise bleed seats. Time to stop the bleeding.
    "Just because the path is well beaten. That doesn't mean it's the right way to go"

  7. #2122
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    Greed is good....only if you are an MLB owner?

    MLB is entertainment. Do we begrudge our favorite actors the multi millions (20M-100'sM if they opt for a percentage of the gross) they make for 1 movie! Or rock stars? For example U2 grossed $736M, the Stones $558M for recent tours.

    Only the select few, the elite ever make it to MLB, less than 1/2% of HS players and about 9.1% of NCAA players ever get to sniff a MLB roster. Some only for a cup of coffee. Yes the average salaries are mind boggling to most of us. Placed in context, MLB players are no different than other pro athletes or their counterparts in the entertainment business. Yhey employ a MLB labor force of 750 men. As MLB in truth likely shows a clear profit, after salaries, of at least 2 billion dollars a year collectively, there’s a lot of money in the business. Why do we reserve such ire for BB players salaries? Are corporate CEO's really worth $500M a year?

    I think part of it is envy and part relates to our own experience with the game. Most have played the game as kids and believe it's easy and still a kids game, why pay astronomical salaries to play a kids game? A somewhat naive perspective for any diehard and knowledgeable BB fan who understands the complexity of the game and the skill required to hit a baseball 500 feet traveling at 99 MPH. Conversely, throwing a ball 99 MPH; Or one that can dance and dart making the very best hitter look silly, but thrown at a velocity that wouldn't break a pane of glass. Don't forget players produce the revenues by their presence.
    “Farts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley
    "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts."--- Albert Einstein
    "If I had more time I would write more briefly."



  8. #2123
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    Seems apropos considering recent discussion. Long read but worth the time.

    The Boss Is Here: Inside Derek Jeter's Quest To Turn Around the Marlins
    By TOM VERDUCCI February 07, 2018

    Derek Jeter is the product of a baseball culture where success, support and profitability were facts of life. The Marlins' new CEO is playing defense right now, but he's as confident as ever.

    https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/07/de...-miami-marlins
    “Farts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley
    "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts."--- Albert Einstein
    "If I had more time I would write more briefly."



  9. #2124
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    Also worth pondering, back in 2014, then Comish Selig boasted about MLB revenue approaching $9 billion! That was an increase from the previous years $8B. Major League Baseball set a record for industry revenues in 2017, according to a Forbes report. Revenues eclipsed $10 billion for the first time this past season. "When accounting for inflation, revenues for the league have grown 325% in the 25 years, or approx. 13% annually and over $500 million in the last two years." https://www.forbes.com/sites/maurybr.../#2c0a14b07880

    MLB is a $10B industry, so even though a $4.47M average player salary is a wonderful amount of money, league owners are getting off cheaply when it comes to payroll. After peaking at a little more than 56% in 2002, today MLB player salaries account for less than 38% of league revenues, a decline of nearly 33% in just 12 years. As a result, player payroll today accounts for just over 38% of MLB’s total revenues, a figure that just ten years ago would have been unimaginably low. Compared to the other big three pro sports MLB players get the smallest percentage of the huge pie that is MLB. https://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/the-...has-a-problem/

    The pot keeps growing.....but the players are the greedy!
    “Farts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley
    "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts."--- Albert Einstein
    "If I had more time I would write more briefly."



  10. #2125
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    Greg Bird knows he has one thing to prove this season
    By Dan Martin February 8, 2018 | 4:42pm

    Greg Bird lofted several monstrous home runs well over the right field fence, looking much like the hitter he was at the end of 2017. The key for Bird this season — just as it was the previous two years — is staying healthy.

    https://nypost.com/2018/02/08/greg-b...e-this-season/
    “Farts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley
    "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts."--- Albert Einstein
    "If I had more time I would write more briefly."



  11. #2126
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    Quote Originally Posted by drt1010 View Post
    Greg Bird knows he has one thing to prove this season
    By Dan Martin February 8, 2018 | 4:42pm

    Greg Bird lofted several monstrous home runs well over the right field fence, looking much like the hitter he was at the end of 2017. The key for Bird this season — just as it was the previous two years — is staying healthy.

    https://nypost.com/2018/02/08/greg-b...e-this-season/
    If he can stay healthy, he will put up some pretty monster numbers. His swing is sweet.

  12. #2127
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCSownsU View Post
    If he can stay healthy, he will put up some pretty monster numbers. His swing is sweet.
    Agree. I wonder is just bad luck or is he really fragile?
    “Farts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley
    "Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts."--- Albert Einstein
    "If I had more time I would write more briefly."



  13. #2128
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    Quote Originally Posted by drt1010 View Post
    Agree. I wonder is just bad luck or is he really fragile?
    Or maybe a mix of both?

    Idk but I hope it was bad luck and he can stay healthy and be in at least 140 games this year.

  14. #2129
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    Quote Originally Posted by drt1010 View Post
    Agree. I wonder is just bad luck or is he really fragile?
    I think it's a little bit of both. Some athletes just get a bunch of random unrelated injuries. In Basketball I remember Marcus Camby always being injured and the injuries were unrelated and random. It was the same thing for Greg Oden. Bird seems to fall in that category. He had back isues, then had the shoulder surgery, and last year had the foot injury. Hopefully he can stay healthy for the rest of his career.

  15. #2130
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    Quote Originally Posted by AFG-NYC View Post
    I think it's a little bit of both. Some athletes just get a bunch of random unrelated injuries. In Basketball I remember Marcus Camby always being injured and the injuries were unrelated and random. It was the same thing for Greg Oden. Bird seems to fall in that category. He had back isues, then had the shoulder surgery, and last year had the foot injury. Hopefully he can stay healthy for the rest of his career.
    The more I learn about the body, the less frequent I believe injuries are purely unrelated. I think the Foot issue was just a weird random issue but the back and shoulder went together.
    Like you said, hopefully he stays healthy

    (And hopefully he's not Nick Johnson)



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