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Thread: Cars and mass

  1. #1
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    Cars and mass

    Over the last 20 years the average weight of cars on US roads has gone up 1000 pounds.

    This is bad for efficiency, wear and tear on parts, handling, and the total energy in crashes.

    Electric cars are going to cause that number to jump up even more.

    How can we encourage people to buy lighter cars?

  2. #2
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    I have a hard time thinking of things that can be done to push people that way.


    We just bought a Suburban to go along with our Corolla. Our first huge vehicle and now I don't think we could ever go back.


    Best bet would be to continue to offer different options , and continue improve on the efficiency/etc?

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  3. #3
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    We go through continual cycles. When gas prices go down, people buy less fuel efficient cars and then when they go up, people buy more efficient cars.
    Let's get embedded tweets working again!

    https://forums.prosportsdaily.com/sh...5#post33780085

  4. #4
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    Sounds like a non-issue to me.

  5. #5
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    I mean more people drive SUVs than ever before so its not that surprising.

    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/g3...ing-cars-2021/

    This has been a trend for a while.

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    Lazy cars. Go on a ****ing diet


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbroncos78087 View Post
    We go through continual cycles. When gas prices go down, people buy less fuel efficient cars and then when they go up, people buy more efficient cars.
    That doesn't hold logically though. Gas was MUCH cheaper in the 1980s and in the 1980s Honda Civics were popular and weighed over 1000 pounds less than Civics do now. Cars keep getting heavier so the "smaller" car choice is still much heavier than they used to be.

    I think we could encourage it by making it so the driver is insured and registered and taxed for driving rather than the car. That way you could have a Suburban for when you need it but also have a small car for your commute without a monthly/annual fee cost/penalty.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by metswon69 View Post
    I mean more people drive SUVs than ever before so its not that surprising.

    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/g3...ing-cars-2021/

    This has been a trend for a while.
    Yes it's been a trend for a while, I did mention the last 20 years so clearly it's been happening

    The question is how do we reverse the trend?

    How about tax breaks for smaller engines like they do in Europe and Japan?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoots View Post
    That doesn't hold logically though. Gas was MUCH cheaper in the 1980s and in the 1980s Honda Civics were popular and weighed over 1000 pounds less than Civics do now. Cars keep getting heavier so the "smaller" car choice is still much heavier than they used to be.

    I think we could encourage it by making it so the driver is insured and registered and taxed for driving rather than the car. That way you could have a Suburban for when you need it but also have a small car for your commute without a monthly/annual fee cost/penalty.
    And how has fuel efficiency changed in that time?


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  10. #10
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    You can make similar comparisons across virtually any brand looking at current models relative to the comparably sized equivalents from 2000 such as the new Toyota Corolla and old Camry or Volkswagen’s latest Jetta and 2000 Passat sedan. In each case as nameplates have moved up in size class and gained substantial amounts of new equipment, they have actually gotten lighter compared to similarly sized models of the past.

    According the annual EPA fuel economy trends report, the average weight of new vehicles has actually stayed surprisingly stable since 1975 with the exception of a period in the 1980s when automakers relied heavily on downsizing in order to meet corporate average fuel economy standards. In 1975, the average weight of new cars was 4.060 pounds. By the 1990s, as fuel prices dropped and CAFE standards stagnated consumers moved back to larger vehicles and weights crept back up again eventually topping two tons by the early-2000s.

    But over the past decade, weight has remained relatively stable sitting at 4,044 pounds in 2017. Despite that, fleet average fuel economy has climbed from 20.6 mpg in 2007 to 25.3 mpg in 2017. Back in 1975, vehicles of roughly the same mass averaged just 13.1 mpg.

    All of this has happened at the same time that American consumers have moved en masse from small cars to crossovers, SUVs and trucks in the last half decade and increasingly vehicles have some degree of electrification which means hauling around more batteries and motors.

    While it would definitely be desirable to have smaller, lighter vehicles since they would put less wear and tear on our road infrastructure and take less space, thus easing congestion, the situation is not necessarily as dire as a single measurement might lead us to believe. Vehicles weigh about as much as they did 40 years ago but they are far safer, less polluting, more efficient and have more capability and convenience features. We are getting more per pound than at any time in automotive history.
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/samabue...h=1639860c4518


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  11. #11
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    Also....what's this have to do with politics?

  12. #12
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    Drive whatever you want.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoots View Post
    Over the last 20 years the average weight of cars on US roads has gone up 1000 pounds.

    This is bad for efficiency, wear and tear on parts, handling, and the total energy in crashes.

    Electric cars are going to cause that number to jump up even more.

    How can we encourage people to buy lighter cars?
    Why would we want to encourage people to buy lower weight cars exactly?

    Um....

    Cars are overall safer and more efficient than ever. A lot of the weight additions I'm cars in the last 40 years are because of things like ABS. Not to mention electric cars are efficient and the heaviest

    Then "energy in crashes".... again who cares? Cars are again more heavy and simultaneously more safe.

    I'm just so confused at these problems.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by spliff(TONE) View Post
    Also....what's this have to do with politics?
    Exactly what every post of yours in this forum does. Nothing.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by natepro View Post
    And how has fuel efficiency changed in that time?
    The engines are far more efficient, but, for example, the 1987 Honda CRX HF got 55mpg in large part because it was a very light vehicle. That car with a modern same size engine would probably be around 80mpg.

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