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  1. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crucis View Post
    Perhaps, but perhaps Berkman's problem was that in switching leagues, he was facing a lot of unfamiliar pitchers without sufficient time to make the proper adjustment. Returning to the NL probably helped him for no other reason than he was back to facing all those familiar pitchers, even the good ones.

    And the same thing could hurt Youk. Yes, maybe on the whole, the pitching in the NL may not be as good as in the AL. But switching leagues could hurt Youk just as bad as it hurt Berkman. Oh, if he hung around into next season with the same NL team, he may have had enough time to make the adjustment and have a good 2013 season. But I have to wonder if switching leagues at this point would just make life more difficult for Youk. Of course, an upside could be that if he was a regular starting 1st baseman for someone, all the regular playing time might offset and league switching issue and help get him back on the beam.
    Players in recent years have had a much easier time switching to the NL it seems though, although youre making perfect sense. Idk haha, ill try to find examples.

    Pitchers clearly do though. Perfect recent example is Burnett

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomar_RA View Post
    Players in recent years have had a much easier time switching to the NL it seems though, although youre making perfect sense. Idk haha, ill try to find examples.

    Pitchers clearly do though. Perfect recent example is Burnett
    The pitching example I was thinking of was Bronson Arroyo. He was pretty much a league average pitcher for the Sox, but in his first season with the Reds, he looked like a total stud.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomar_RA View Post
    Players in recent years have had a much easier time switching to the NL it seems though, although you're making perfect sense. Idk haha, I'll try to find examples.
    Oh, and I suspect that this is more of an issue for mid-season trades than for off-season ones. A hitter who is traded in the off-season has spring training to make adjustments and start to learn the unfamiliar pitchers, while the mid-season league switcher gets thrown into the deep end of the pool so to speak without any time to adjust.

  4. #49
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Greenville, SC
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    17,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Nomar_RA View Post
    Players in recent years have had a much easier time switching to the NL it seems though, although youre making perfect sense. Idk haha, ill try to find examples.

    Pitchers clearly do though. Perfect recent example is Burnett
    Pitchers do for the exact opposite reason that hitters suffer. Pitchers have the advantage of relatively few people in the other league knowing what they throw, tendencies, etc. The hitters' ignorance plays to the pitcher's favor.

  5. #50
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    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSoxtober View Post
    Pitchers do for the exact opposite reason that hitters suffer. Pitchers have the advantage of relatively few people in the other league knowing what they throw, tendencies, etc. The hitters' ignorance plays to the pitcher's favor.
    And it probably doesn't hurt if the pitcher has a somewhat quirky motion, like Arroyo. I suspect that guys with very "normal" pitching motions are a little less of a mystery than guys with something quirky in the mix, be it an odd pitching motion or a knuckleball, or something.

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