Like us on Facebook


Follow us on Twitter





Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 46
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    158

    The moment the talks fell apart

    Great story here on espn:

    http://espn.go.com/blog/truehoop/pos...lks-fell-apart

    Apparently, the owners were absolutely ready to settle at 50/50 and were prepared to negotiate on the finer points 24/7 to save the season. Union rep Kessler said he recalled that the players would support 50/50 as well.

    Instead, 3 superstars barged in, and stated that 50/50 was not good enough.

    Dwayne Wade felt disrespected when Stern pointed at him.

    As I suspected all along, it's the egos of a very small minority of the game's oldest, most arrogant, and highest paid players who are also therefore the most influential, who "vetoed" the would be, almost proposed deal.

    So, it's really Stern's out of touch arrogance and douchebaggery, and the douchebaggery, enormous egos and greed of just a handful of players or less.

    You're welcome.



    October 4: The day talks to save the NBA season went haywire.
    David Stern, Billy Hunter, Derek Fisher, Adam Silver, Spurs owner Peter Holt, union lawyers Ron Klempner and Jeffrey Kessler ... with various others dropping in from time to time, that crew of seven had met more than 40 times and for untold hours over the last two years. None of them had had good summers.

    But all those hours in rented conference rooms, all those dishes of hotel mints, rows of water glasses and catered lunches had not been a total waste of time. They had led to some things. The league had dropped its insistence on a hard cap, for instance. The players had offered to hand over something close to a billion dollars in future earnings.

    And more importantly, by last Tuesday, there was a deal in the air.

    Both sides were still keeping their best offers secret ... but those in the room say they were getting a sense where things were headed. You can tell a hell of a lot about where things are headed, Stern says, "if you listen."

    "We thought we could live," union head Hunter said later on WFAN, "with the deal we were close to making."

    On Oct. 4, the NBA's negotiators entered a midtown Manhattan hotel with more than a little glimmer of hope.

    There would still be issues to deal with, like the luxury tax, cap exceptions and the length of contracts. But even the hardest-bitten journalists in the hallway allowed that it could, finally, be deal day.

    The league's negotiators had four things going for them:

    A memory of Kessler suggesting, about a month earlier, in another hotel, at another meeting, that the players might go for something like a 50/50 split of basketball revenues.
    Out of a meeting with owners in Dallas, little consensus about what Stern could offer the players, but nevertheless an agreement among owners to empower the league's labor committee to negotiate with players "on all points."
    The league's labor committee, more than a third of the league's owners, including those from the Lakers, Knicks, Celtics and Spurs, assembled in New York ready to deal.
    The scheduled November start of the regular season around the corner.


    What happened next will one day be studied by students of labor, business, race relations and more.

    Nobody disputes that Stern and Silver talked to Fisher and Kessler in the hallway, bringing up what they thought would be music to Kessler's ears. His offer, of splitting basketball-related income down the middle ... maybe it was time to see if the two sides could sell that to their respective groups.

    Stern was confident he could talk enough owners into it, and as for the players ... Kessler was their pit bull. And this was his idea!

    Having floated their big idea, the offer so sweet it just might get them in trouble with their owners, the league officials were excited to know they at least had a victory in the bag. They'd have a long night of dealing with systems issues ahead of them, but maybe, just maybe, this long summer of meetings could be wrapped up. Maybe the season would be intact.

    Denied

    As Stern has recounted a dozen times since, not long after what was supposed to have been the hallway conversation that saved the season, something odd and wholly unexpected happened. There was a knock on the door where Stern was selling his owners on the idea. The players wanted to talk.

    When they convened, instead of the union's head, Hunter, or its negotiating committee of Maurice Evans, Matt Bonner, Roger Mason, Theo Ratliff, Etan Thomas and Chris Paul, representing the players were Fisher, Kessler and three superstars who had been to very few of the meetings at all: Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Kobe Bryant.

    A bad sign: Pierce was still wearing his backpack.

    The players had two pieces of news that shocked the league: 50/50 was not good enough. And there was nothing further to discuss.


    "We had a large group of owners," remembers Silver, "who had flown in and were prepared to negotiate around the clock."

    More importantly, they had made an aggressively good offer, the NBA's leaders thought, the one that might get them in trouble with their owners but surely not with the players.

    And players who hadn't even been in the talks, and who seemed not to be on the same page with the crew that had endured more than 40 meetings, had been the ones to reject the best offer the league was likely to have, and to end the best day of negotiations prematurely.

    What in the hell was going on? How had they so misread the situation? And where was Hunter? Who spoke for the union? Should the league have been negotiating with Garnett all along?

    Later the league would suggest that the talks had fallen apart because the union happened to have some particularly strident players show up that day.

    Maybe it's as simple as that. Or maybe it's much more complicated.
    Last edited by hard_candy; 10-16-2011 at 07:37 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    VANCOUVER
    Posts
    55,494
    Great, Garnett, Pierce, and Bryant. Three of the league's brightest light bulbs. Of the three, Kobe is probably the only one able to spell his name, let alone negotiate a CBA.
    Last edited by ink; 10-16-2011 at 07:29 PM.
    If we're all such great coaches why do we recruit so hard? You need players.

    ~ Jack Armstrong, ECF 2016

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    38,558
    Quote Originally Posted by ink View Post
    Great, Garnett, Pierce, and Bryant. Three of the league's brightest light bulbs. Of the three, Kobe is probably the only one able to spell his name.
    I know you're exaggerating, but stereotypes really piss me off. C'mon.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    15,824
    NBA players are complete trash.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    38,558
    Quote Originally Posted by fadedmario View Post
    NBA players are complete trash.
    Nice derogatory generalization. Glad to see we're evolving as a society.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    VANCOUVER
    Posts
    55,494
    Quote Originally Posted by Corey View Post
    I know you're exaggerating, but stereotypes really piss me off. C'mon.
    It's not a stereotype. If it had been Duncan, Nash, or even the actual members of the negotiating committee (!!!) who had put in 40 meetings (!!!), there might have been a chance. But hearing Garnett, Pierce, or even Kobe talk, do you get the impression of intelligence? I sure don't. I get the impression of fierce competitors, which is fine on the court, but I don't get the impression that these three belong in ANY type of bargaining session.
    If we're all such great coaches why do we recruit so hard? You need players.

    ~ Jack Armstrong, ECF 2016

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    The Doghouse
    Posts
    12,105
    Yeah, this was real depressing to me. I think of guys like Garnett with $20M a year contracts and just shake my head.

    Can we get a story about someone with a mid-level contract? Maybe someone who says: "Wait, you want it so that one guy doesn't get a third of the cap and leave 14 other guys to get paid the other two thirds? So that a team could just sign me outright because they have capspace left? That makes sense!" Oh, and: "So, that team could actually look to sign that second star Superstar A complains he needs to win a championship?"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    15,824
    Quote Originally Posted by Corey View Post
    Nice derogatory generalization. Glad to see we're evolving as a society.
    I call them like i see them. I hope we lose the NBA until 2015.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,541
    So much greed and arrogance its pathetic really.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    15,075
    I don't feel like finding the link... but I recall either Stern specifically saying himself the NBPA threw out the idea of if the players settled at 50%, would the owners concede most of the system changes, and Stern said the owners said blankly "No."

    Can't have it both ways. Can't say the players are greedy, yet expect them to take the 50% AND take a bunch of system changes to limit their free agency. 50% split is a 15% paycut for all players. So I don't hold any stake in that article's stance.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    957
    i honestly hope we lose the season too for a while at least, nothing is more ugly then someone that sign's a 20,000,000 contract And Needs a lil more before they feel comfortable! ..... AND SOMEONE PLEASE TELL ME WHY! IS DEREK FISHER THE LEADER IN THIS! i would feel so much better with some old man that i have NO IDEA what his name is leading the Way, NOT THE STARTING POINT GUARD FOR THE LAKERS!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    957
    Quote Originally Posted by beasted86 View Post
    I don't feel like finding the link... but I recall either Stern specifically saying himself the NBPA threw out the idea of if the players settled at 50%, would the owners concede most of the system changes, and Stern said the owners said blankly "No."

    Can't have it both ways. Can't say the players are greedy, yet expect them to take the 50% AND take a bunch of system changes to limit their free agency. 50% split is a 15% paycut for all players. So I don't hold any stake in that article's stance.
    Someone's mad cause his player killed the season lol

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    15,075
    Here's the link btw:
    http://newyork.cbslocal.com/audio-on...e-francesa-1/# @ 17:50 mark

    David Stern:
    The first time 50% was uttered it was by the player's negotiator who said, "It's not an offer it's a concept, it's a concept if you leave everything else the same" and we said "no, no, no, no"

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    28,336
    Quote Originally Posted by Eagles710 View Post
    Someone's mad cause his player killed the season lol
    someone is mad that his own "super team" is below .500

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    56,314
    How are they complaining? If it was someone like Fields or Barnes making minimum, I'd understand.

    All have made a minimum $200 million from NBA and endorsements.

    Come on guys.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •