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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    New Jersey
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    5,417

    Arrow Blazers' Roy to have arthroscopic surgery on left knee

    Not sure it was posted or not... dont fee like looking
    Greg Oden's finally looking ready. But the guy who will get him the ball is banged up.

    The Portland Trail Blazers announced on Wednesday that guard Brandon Roy will have arthroscopic surgery on his left knee on Thursday. The operation will repair a tear in the meniscus that was revealed by MRI on Tuesday. Blazers team physician Dr. Don Roberts will perform the procedure at Southwest Washington Regional Surgery Center in Vancouver, Wash., and a timetable for Roy's return will be established after surgery.

    Oden, the top pick in last year's draft who missed all of the 2007-08 campaign after right knee surgery, worked out for the media on Tuesday.

    The 7-footer from Ohio State showed no signs of problems in two-on-two work with teammates Steve Blake and Channing Frye and former Arkansas star Steven Hill, a 7-footer invited to practice with Portland. Oden isn't allowed to go five-on-five until next month.

    "I'm feeling good," Oden said. "I do not have any pain or soreness in my knee."

    Roy is part of a young nucleus for the up-and-coming Blazers. The 2006-07 Rookie of the Year has averaged 18.1 points, 5.0 assists and 4.6 rebounds over his two years in the league.

    Roy helped the Blazers improve by 11 wins in his rookie year to a 32-50 mark, and even without Oden, Portland jumped up to 41 wins last season.
    http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=3534265

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    28,963
    OUCH!....isn't that what amare had? hopefully he can bounce fromt this.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cville
    Posts
    4,689
    That suck's big time. How long is he out 4?
    Last edited by JIDsanity; 08-14-2008 at 01:17 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cville
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    4,689
    Hopefully not as long as Oden

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    1,674
    WTF? Come on Blazers, stay healthy!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    School in Hoboken, home in Rockland County, NY
    Posts
    55,149
    Quote Originally Posted by still1ballin View Post
    OUCH!....isn't that what amare had? hopefully he can bounce fromt this.
    No, Amare had microfracture knee surgery. Much, much, much worse.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,704
    actually alot of teams were scared to draft roy because he had red flags on his knees....hopefully this isnt a sign of an injury prone career....but it think i remember something about his knees looking horrible when he went in for the workouts his freshman year...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    5,274
    so how long is he out for?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Oak Hill, VA
    Posts
    1,766
    WOW! This sucks! Oden is healthy and looking good, Bayless was looking good. This team was taking shape then this happens. I hope it's not for a long time.


    Bobby Ray Simmons AKA B.O.B= The Best Up-And-Coming Rapper in the Game

    http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/audio/...hange-gon-come

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    750
    Do not worry, it is not supposed to last long.

    According to wikipedia, an arthroscopic knee surgery takes about a week or two to fully recover.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthroscopy

    Knee arthroscopy



    Lateral meniscus located between thigh bone (femur, above) and shin bone (tibia, below). The tibial cartilage displays a fissure (tip of teaser instrument).
    Knee arthroscopy has in many cases replaced the classic arthrotomy that was performed in the past. Today knee arthroscopy is commonly performed for treating meniscus injury, reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and for cartilage microfracturing. Arthroscopy can also be performed just for diagnosing and checking of the knee; however, the latter use has been mainly replaced by magnetic resonance imaging.
    During an average knee arthroscopy, a small fiberoptic camera (the endoscope) is inserted into the joint through a small incision, about 4 mm (1/8 inch) long. A special fluid is used to visualize the joint parts. More incisions might be performed in order to check other parts of the knee. Then other miniature instruments are used and the surgery is performed.
    Recovery after a knee arthroscopy is significantly faster as compared to arthrotomy. Most patients can return home and walk using crutches the same or the next day after the surgery. Recovery time depends on the reason that surgery was needed and the patient's physical condition. Usually a patient can fully load his leg already within a couple of days and after a few weeks the joint function can fully recover. It is not uncommon for athletes who have an above average physical condition to return to normal athletic activities within a few weeks.
    Arthroscopic surgeries of the knee are done for many reasons, but the usefulness of surgery for treating osteoarthritis is doubtful. A double-blind placebo-controlled study on arthroscopic surgery for osteoarthritis of the knee was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2002.[2] In this three-group study, 180 military veterans with osteoarthritis of the knee were randomly assigned to receive arthroscopic débridement with lavage, just arthroscopic lavage, or a sham surgery, which made superficial incisions to the skin while pretending to do the surgery. For two years after the surgeries, patients reported their pain levels and were evaluated for joint motion. Neither the patients nor the independent evaluators knew which patients had received which surgery. The study reported, "At no point did either of the intervention groups report less pain or better function than the placebo group."[3] Because there is no confirmed usefulness for these surgeries, many agencies are reconsidering paying for a surgery which seems to create risks with no benefit.[4]
    I hope that is right for you Blazers fans.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    397
    yea, a torn meniscus isn't as serious as Amare's

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Shambala
    Posts
    44,110
    bad news for him, im sorry for the blazers but id be an hypocrate if i said it does not make me a littke ( VERY VERY VERY LITTLE) Happy, since it means Rudy Fernadnez will get the chance to show his skills.

    Surr there are some "happy" people on Bayless camp too...
    ]

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    8,424
    Quote Originally Posted by still1ballin View Post
    OUCH!....isn't that what amare had? hopefully he can bounce fromt this.
    Amare Staudemire had microfracture surgery, which is considered the worst injury in the sports world. That is the same injury that Oden had and was out for a year.

    Arthroscopic surgery is the same surgery that Andrew Bynum had about two months ago and a month ago, he was cleared to play and is currently looking amazing and is in amazing shape according to his personal trainer who said he is looking like a beast.

    Blazer fans, do not worry. This is definitely not as serious as Oden's injury. This surgery is more along the lines of the surgery Andrew Bynum had recently.
    Last edited by ARMIN12NBA; 08-14-2008 at 03:28 AM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Some Place Nice
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    2,510
    I hope this doesn't slow him down.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8
    kobe had this two years ago in july i believe. he only missed 2 games.
    like previously stated, dont worry guys

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