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USASports
04-27-2017, 06:33 AM
It seems like it's after every loss now either a player or coach has to make a scene. I understand, it's playoff time and everyone shows some sort of emotion, but when he media is just doing their job and the players or coach makes it seem like their fault is wrong. I don't even find it that entertaining. It's been a common theme recently with Westbrook, CP3 and now Hoiberg.

I get it, the last thing you want to do is lose a playoff game and now talk about it, but I just don't find this amusing at all. If anything it's just to gather some attention.

SportsFanatic10
04-27-2017, 06:41 AM
Take that for data! lol

Scoots
04-27-2017, 09:49 AM
I'd rather have them be real than just parrot the company line.

https://youtu.be/oXAW2qd65nA

Quinnsanity
04-27-2017, 04:07 PM
I'd rather have them be real than just parrot the company line.

https://youtu.be/oXAW2qd65nA

This. It's better to have interesting moments than not.

Scoots
04-27-2017, 04:19 PM
This. It's better to have interesting moments than not.

I think the mandatory press conference time messes things up for us too. It means the players are less likely to talk to individual press members and also allows them to fully compose themselves after the game and plan what they are going to say as well as get coached.

It's just boring. You KNOW it's boring when the highlight of the playoff press conferences is a kid sitting in her dad's lap. :rolleyes:

JasonJohnHorn
04-27-2017, 07:44 PM
Sometimes I feel like they are all just going through the motions, but with the click-bait media these days, I feel like the reporters are more looking for a line they can take out of context than one that is going to offer insights.

Like asking Adams (and Westy?) about the benches production when Westy comes off the court? Obviousl the bench doesn't do as well. No $#!t. But getting Westy to say that? That's a headline: Westrbrook doesn't trust his teammates. Is he leaving OKC?


Westy (I think the question was for Adams) stepped in and stood up for his teammates and the reporter just didn't want to accept that and asked it several times. Like... let it go... you can ask whatever you want, but they don't have to give you the answer you are hoping for. That is bad reporting.


The Hoiberg IT-carrying question? I mean... you are asking him to get fined by the league. Which he already had. YES!!! IT CARRIES THE BALL AND THE OFFICIALS LET HIM!! It is CRAZY. It is annoying (I don't even care of Boston wins or loses and don't like the Bulls, but that is just crazy). Don't ask him... you know his answer will get him a fine.


So yeah.... I side with the players/coaches on this most often, because it usually seems the media is baiting.

Pop's a little different... he's a smart @$$, even with good questions, but his attitude is: I'm a coach. I'm not giving my insights away for the other team to work around them, but I have to be here to you get yes-no-andsmartass answers. I respect that.

Asking how they are going to respond to a certain player, or how they might cut down an issue like turnovers seems fine. Asking a winning team how the executed and how they plan on preparing for the next game. Or asking guys about the importance of a contribution of another player or the absence of a guy... those are more productive.


Don't ask "Which teammate are you going to throw under the bus" "where are you going in free agency" and "do you care to get fined for criticizing the officials". It stupid. The reporters should know better.

Quinnsanity
04-28-2017, 01:00 PM
I think the mandatory press conference time messes things up for us too. It means the players are less likely to talk to individual press members and also allows them to fully compose themselves after the game and plan what they are going to say as well as get coached.

It's just boring. You KNOW it's boring when the highlight of the playoff press conferences is a kid sitting in her dad's lap. :rolleyes:

There was a groundswell of journalists last year, particularly local beat writers, who came out and said "kids shouldn't be allowed in press conferences." And they're right to say so. These guys have deadlines to get their gamers in, and they need quotes, even if they're bland or boring. Steph can wait a few extra minutes to see Riley. They're just making it harder for people to do their jobs. It bothers me, especially in a world where exposing Riley Curry, a toddler, has actual financial implications for the Curry family. People are obsessed with them, follow them on a ton of media outlets, they're using a child to help further a brand. I know it's such an old man complaint, but as someone who would like to write about basketball for a living, it would bother me to no end if I couldn't get a quote because a player wanted to show off his daughter.