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View Full Version : Weird NBA Lineups (not player specific) Question - real question no agenda



PhillyFaninLA
05-28-2015, 07:08 AM
While I don't agree with quite of few of the other posters on specific topics, I do know that many of you know the finer points of the game better than I do so I have a question:


Depending on your talent and your bench do you think weird or unusual starting lineups can work in the NBA and lead to a winning team.


Specifically what I mean is if you have the talent can starting 5's like the below work. Thanks and look forward to reading your thoughts.

PG, SG, SG, SF, PF
PG, SG, SG, PF, C
PG, SG, SF, PF, PF
PG, SG, PF, PF, C
PG, SF, PF, PF, C
PG, SF, PF, C, C

Things along those lines. I just listed those as examples to show what I'm asking, of course a balanced PG, SG, SF, PF, C would be best but can you build a winning team with a starting lineup that is unusual or weird like those listed above or something weird I haven't listed.

eso
05-28-2015, 07:34 AM
The question can't really be answered because it depends entirely on the skill set of each player at each position.

PhillyFaninLA
05-28-2015, 08:06 AM
The question can't really be answered because it depends entirely on the skill set of each player at each position.

Thanks, I appreciate the input

JasonJohnHorn
05-28-2015, 09:10 AM
Absolutely.

Positions are just in place for casual fans to understand the rudiments of the game. Few coaches actually use them religiously.


I mean, The Bulls started two SGs (Jordan Harper) two small forwards (Scottie Pippen/Dennis Rodman) and whatever tall white guy they had to clog the lane. You can say Rodman was a power forward, but he didn't play like one on offense, and he guarded who ever he needed to guard on defense.


The Spurs were starting two centers the entire time D-Rob and Duncan were together; they just called Duncan a PF.

The Heat the last two years Started a 'point guard' that was a spot-up shooter and therefore a shooting guard in all practicality (Chambers) had no center, started two small forwards (Battier and LBJ) a power forward (Bosh) and a shooting guard (Wade).

So there line-up was essentially SG, SG, SF, SF, PF. And they won an NBA title with that line up. No center and no point guard.

Very few teams use a PG/SG/SF/PF/C line up.

That Cavs just got to the finals with that line-up, but their 'SF' is really a point guard. The Warriors just got to the finals with a PG, SG, SF, SF, C line up. The Rockets got to the finals in the 80's with a double-center line up. The Celtics had a two centers and a power forward (Parish, McHale, Bird) in their starting line-up. We call Bird a 'small forward' now, but if you watch him play, he's in the post constantly and plays like what we call a stretch four now.

Position titles mean nothing, especially with the shift to three-point shots. It's about having guys on the wing. I mean, you could make a case that on offense, in terms of style of play, the Warriors have a C, and PG and three SG, but Barnes and Green are just big shooting guards who play PF and SF on defense. I mean, Green is a 'power forward', but he takes 4 3-point shots a game? That sounds like a SG to me.

valade16
05-28-2015, 09:58 AM
While I don't agree with quite of few of the other posters on specific topics, I do know that many of you know the finer points of the game better than I do so I have a question:


Depending on your talent and your bench do you think weird or unusual starting lineups can work in the NBA and lead to a winning team.


Specifically what I mean is if you have the talent can starting 5's like the below work. Thanks and look forward to reading your thoughts.

PG, SG, SG, SF, PF
PG, SG, SG, PF, C
PG, SG, SF, PF, PF
PG, SG, PF, PF, C
PG, SF, PF, PF, C
PG, SF, PF, C, C

Things along those lines. I just listed those as examples to show what I'm asking, of course a balanced PG, SG, SF, PF, C would be best but can you build a winning team with a starting lineup that is unusual or weird like those listed above or something weird I haven't listed.

It's definitely possible though I think whoever is switching their position needs to be able to have the versatility to play different roles on the court.

The Spurs used 2 Centers with Duncan/D-Rob and it worked but the Rockets had trouble using 2 C's in Howard and Asik.

The Lakers had Odom at SF alongside Pau and Bynum, that was a really big lineup and it worked.

The Suns used Dragic and Bledsoe side by side and had some success.

The Warriors beat the Rockets by using a small lineup of Baron Davis, Monta Ellis, Jason Richardson and Stephen Jackson.

It can work but it requires the necessary matchup and the versatility of the players to make it work.