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View Full Version : How do you play defense on a jumpshot?



KnicksorBust
11-18-2014, 11:34 PM
Do you jump to get the block?
Do you run at the shooter chopping your feet to get a hand in the face?
Do you run past with your head down toward their midsection?

Do you think one method is significantly better and why? Does anyone know if there is any research?

Vinny642
11-18-2014, 11:49 PM
Usually I play to distract them, as compared to actually making a play to block. But if I have decent position to get a block, I would.

PowerHouse
11-19-2014, 12:12 AM
There is no single simple answer. It all depends on your positioning at time of shot.

mikekhelxD
11-19-2014, 12:26 AM
Im pretty short 5'6" barefoot and play PG. Blocking the shot is the last thing i'd think about. How I defend shooters is basically a game long process. Im not fast either, but im a little quick. I harass the **** out of them by giving them barely any space when they have the ball. I play the passing lane too. Then whenever they get the chance to shoot, i talk **** by daring them. I play with them mentally. This is how I play when it comes to league games. I hardly play pick up games anymore. At least with league games, this type of defense carry on with my opposition. So they either improve their game for the next game we play, or I leave a mark with them that "argh, that guy again."

I do get burn when they run a screen, but i'd say my opposition tends to rather spot up than to actually run a play that involves them. Thats quite easy for me to defend since they basically stand at the corner waiting for a pass.

Sadds The Gr8
11-19-2014, 12:27 AM
I just get my hand up near the ball. I don't expect to block but I hope it distracts the shooter enough to miss.

When I shoot I don't mind a hand in my face, but that running with your head down toward my midsection bothers the **** outta me.

Hawkeye15
11-19-2014, 12:34 AM
you make them catch as deep as possible. If they get a clean catch and you are recovering, you run hard at them, get as tall as you can, don't leave your feet, and make damn sure they don't follow their miss with a rebound. If the ref is on the blind side of you, glance the shooting elbow.

murphturph
11-19-2014, 12:43 AM
You play an arms length away, so the man cannot blow by you
If he shoots, you DON't leave your feet and go for the block.
YOU put your hands in their EYES. 99/100 your not gonna block a jump shot.

SportsFanatic10
11-19-2014, 01:23 AM
i try and pull the battier defense with a hand in between the arms of the shooter trying to block his vison when i can. but it's hard to do sometimes without getting a foul, so mostly i just close out and try and get my hand up as high as possible in front of the shot. if i'm a bit late closing i'll leave my feet if i see they're committed to the shot by that time.

MrfadeawayJB
11-19-2014, 01:30 AM
Cup their nuts in your hand and hope they miss

tredigs
11-19-2014, 01:37 AM
Easy! Like this: http://247sports.com/Bolt/Pelicans-Davis-blocks-two-shots-in-three-seconds-33041597

PowerHouse
11-19-2014, 01:42 AM
It also depends on the height difference between you and the shooter, not to mention quickness difference if there is any. Like the other guy said, its pretty hard to block a jumpshot but I personally have blocked a ton of them because Im 6'4 and I like to play close up to the shooter. If the shooter is shorter and blows by me I have enough length and quickness to catch up and block it from behind Lebron style.

kingsdelez24
11-19-2014, 01:52 AM
I find it easier to block shots in 1 on 1 situations by using the opposite of whichever hand my check shoots with to contest the shot, though that's only if I feel like anticipating his release. I prefer to just stay up on my check, and keep my hands up rather than jump, unless like I previously said, I feel like I can anticipate the release properly.

It all really depends on the situation

PatsSoxKnicks
11-19-2014, 02:08 AM
Do you jump to get the block?
Do you run at the shooter chopping your feet to get a hand in the face?
Do you run past with your head down toward their midsection?

Do you think one method is significantly better and why? Does anyone know if there is any research?

Yeah there's sort of some research. Given new data, I'm sure there will be more.

Not sure about the people in this thread but most NBA players aren't bothered by a hand in their face

SoulBrotha
11-19-2014, 03:03 AM
Yeea I agree with most of you guys. Never did understand that new defense were the defender ducks and runs past the jump shooter. Its dumb.

KnicksorBust
11-19-2014, 07:04 AM
Do you jump to get the block?
Do you run at the shooter chopping your feet to get a hand in the face?
Do you run past with your head down toward their midsection?

Do you think one method is significantly better and why? Does anyone know if there is any research?

Yeah there's sort of some research. Given new data, I'm sure there will be more.

Not sure about the people in this thread but most NBA players aren't bothered by a hand in their face

Link? Is jumping at the shooter cause them to miss more frequently than just getting a hand up?

KnicksorBust
11-19-2014, 07:05 AM
I just get my hand up near the ball. I don't expect to block but I hope it distracts the shooter enough to miss.

When I shoot I don't mind a hand in my face, but that running with your head down toward my midsection bothers the **** outta me.

Lmao. The first time my buddy did that to me I shot the most disgusting airball. Over the long term though I would think thats a bad strategy because the shooter gets such a clean look at the basket.

R. Johnson#3
11-19-2014, 07:37 AM
I'm not a shot blocker so i wave my hand in front of the shooters eyes as close as I can. If I was a shot blocker, I'd do the same. It's very hard to block a jump shot and most of the time isn't worth the chance to get called for a foul.

IndyRealist
11-19-2014, 09:51 AM
Unless you have spider arms or are a foot taller, you're not blocking a decent jump shooter. All you are doing is setting them up to pump fake and either blow by you or draw a foul the rest of the game.

Of course if he's not decent and takes shots while you are right in his face, you can go for a block just to force him to shoot a fadeaway.

It really depends on how you play defense in general, I guess.

YAALREADYKNO
11-19-2014, 10:15 AM
you jump to try to get the block but once you realize you cant get the block you at least wanna put a hand in their face

mike_noodles
11-19-2014, 10:17 AM
Controlled close out and contest the shot. Stay down and don't leave your feet.

torocan
11-19-2014, 11:04 AM
Stay down, don't leave your feet and contest the shot with a hand up unless you are freakishly tall/longer or have crazy hops. Very few players are long/athletic enough to actually block a jump shot, and it's very high risk considering how easy it is to draw a minor contact foul.

That and don't forget to play ball denial defense prior to the catch. Make it harder for them to catch and the passer will simply look them off more often than not.

Heatcheck
11-19-2014, 11:08 AM
get in their ****....so to speak.
Close out and stick my hand above his face and just basically invade his space and make his shot as uncomfortable as possible.
while at the same time exaggerating the fact that im not touching them.

Id rather make him alter his shooting motion than try to block it.

JasonJohnHorn
11-19-2014, 12:04 PM
It depends.

If you are going one-on-one and the guy can cut to the basket fast and has a fade-away, you are screwed, because if you get him up close enough to defend the shot properly, he'll blow by you and cut to the basket. Ig you give him enough space that he can't get that first step on you, you won't be able to get close enough to block a fade-away. Best bet then is the hand in the face.


If the guy can't cut fast, play him close.


If it's Josh Smith, Ricky Rubio, or Austin Rivers, just let him shoot.

KnicksorBust
11-19-2014, 12:10 PM
The reason why I ask if that I am a coach of a freshman high school team and I have my tryouts next week. One of the ideas I'm toying with this season is having a "never jump" strategy on close outs and systematically do drills to have my players completely phase that out of their game. Obviously it's still important to jump when contesting a drive to the basket or rebounding the ball but I'm starting to think over time that there are so many more frequent negatives (a foul or being pump faked) than their are positives (a block, forcing a miss that wouldn't have already been a miss anyway). For the life of me I can't decide how much harder it would be to shoot if the defender was jumping than if the defender just put the hand up. There's really no way to know for sure I suppose.

Do you think this is a good strategy?

KnicksorBust
11-19-2014, 12:11 PM
It depends.

If you are going one-on-one and the guy can cut to the basket fast and has a fade-away, you are screwed, because if you get him up close enough to defend the shot properly, he'll blow by you and cut to the basket. Ig you give him enough space that he can't get that first step on you, you won't be able to get close enough to block a fade-away. Best bet then is the hand in the face.


If the guy can't cut fast, play him close.


If it's Josh Smith, Ricky Rubio, or Austin Rivers, just let him shoot.

:laugh: Did you go back, edit, and add Ricky Rubio and Austin Rivers? I could have sworn the first time I read it you just wrote Josh Smith. Maybe I read too quickly.

torocan
11-19-2014, 12:46 PM
The reason why I ask if that I am a coach of a freshman high school team and I have my tryouts next week. One of the ideas I'm toying with this season is having a "never jump" strategy on close outs and systematically do drills to have my players completely phase that out of their game. Obviously it's still important to jump when contesting a drive to the basket or rebounding the ball but I'm starting to think over time that there are so many more frequent negatives (a foul or being pump faked) than their are positives (a block, forcing a miss that wouldn't have already been a miss anyway). For the life of me I can't decide how much harder it would be to shoot if the defender was jumping than if the defender just put the hand up. There's really no way to know for sure I suppose.

Do you think this is a good strategy?

The math on a straight contest is very well established in the advanced statistics community. If you put a hand in someone's face they're going to be about 15% less effective in their jump shot. (IE 48% vs 33%, 40% vs 25%)

Now, ask yourself what percentage of blocked shots someone is going to make? Your average player might actually block a shot maybe 1 in 30, 50 or 100 tries. For that you are trading off the risk of a foul or being out of position if they get shot faked or the ball gets passed.

The risk of a foul is substantial, a similar risk is the defender being off balanced and now a step out of sync on a defensive recovery.

If you're talking high school players, I'd tell every one of them to never jump to block a jump shot unless they're substantially longer/more athletic than their opponents and even then the advantages are slim at best.

Even in the paint you're better off not jumping to block a jump shot and letting the weak side defender attempt a block since your paint defender usually can't afford random fouls due to lack of depth at the Center position.

I'll put it this way, if Gregg Popovich calls out Danny Green (who is infinitely more athletic and longer than anyone you'll see on your roster) in the middle of a finals game for attempting a block instead of a straight hand in the face contest, then how does it make even remote sense for high school players to be attempting to block a jump shot?

Hand in the face, contest, and box out for the rebound. Stick to those fundamentals and it will pay off far more often than it doesn't, especially since high school players aren't great jump shooters in the first place.

IndyRealist
11-19-2014, 01:40 PM
I'll put it this way, if Gregg Popovich calls out Danny Green (who is infinitely more athletic and longer than anyone you'll see on your roster) in the middle of a finals game for attempting a block instead of a straight hand in the face contest, then how does it make even remote sense for high school players to be attempting to block a jump shot?


This is all that really had to be said. Do what the Spurs do.

PatsSoxKnicks
11-19-2014, 04:17 PM
Link? Is jumping at the shooter cause them to miss more frequently than just getting a hand up?

Well basically the research says that getting your hand up doesn't make that big of a difference on jump shots compared to just being close to the jump shooter (within 0-3 feet). So I'd imagine that in most cases if you're that close- 0 to 3 feet- but not putting your hand up, you're jumping at the shooter. But that's not really definitive. Only part of the research that was is that getting your hand up doesn't make that much of a difference. And I've heard some NBA players say that too (that they weren't bothered by the hand in their face).

Hawkeye15
11-19-2014, 04:29 PM
The reason why I ask if that I am a coach of a freshman high school team and I have my tryouts next week. One of the ideas I'm toying with this season is having a "never jump" strategy on close outs and systematically do drills to have my players completely phase that out of their game. Obviously it's still important to jump when contesting a drive to the basket or rebounding the ball but I'm starting to think over time that there are so many more frequent negatives (a foul or being pump faked) than their are positives (a block, forcing a miss that wouldn't have already been a miss anyway). For the life of me I can't decide how much harder it would be to shoot if the defender was jumping than if the defender just put the hand up. There's really no way to know for sure I suppose.

Do you think this is a good strategy?

I do think it's a good strategy, but I would stress jumping if they picked up their dribble. But in reality, the best defensive teams rarely are good at getting steals and blocks. They prefer to never gamble or take risks, instead just making players take tougher shots.

You can also teach them to pretend like they are going to give the guy a nut shot when he shoots.

PatsSoxKnicks
11-19-2014, 05:58 PM
The math on a straight contest is very well established in the advanced statistics community. If you put a hand in someone's face they're going to be about 15% less effective in their jump shot. (IE 48% vs 33%, 40% vs 25%)


Those numbers aren't true. And those numbers are also a function of the shot clock and location of the shot. For shots at the rim, the difference is true but not for jump shots.

I think you might be using the SportVu definition which DOES NOT include contest- i.e. hand in the face. SportVu's definition of contest is simply a few feet within the shooter, no hand up or down.

PatsSoxKnicks
11-19-2014, 06:01 PM
I do think it's a good strategy, but I would stress jumping if they picked up their dribble. But in reality, the best defensive teams rarely are good at getting steals and blocks. They prefer to never gamble or take risks, instead just making players take tougher shots.

You can also teach them to pretend like they are going to give the guy a nut shot when he shoots.

That's not really true and the statistical evidence goes against that. Aggressive trapping defenses can be quite effective (i.e. Miami from the previous years before they got old)

Hawkeye15
11-19-2014, 06:11 PM
That's not really true and the statistical evidence goes against that. Aggressive trapping defenses can be quite effective (i.e. Miami from the previous years before they got old)

I meant on an individual basis when it comes to shot contesting, and passing lanes

Also, if you have a team like Miami, who is probably more athletic at each position, it can be a controlled gamble, because elite athletes can recover quicker, their teammates can recover quicker after the help, etc. Most teams aren't made up of that athletic content though..

torocan
11-19-2014, 07:42 PM
Those numbers aren't true. And those numbers are also a function of the shot clock and location of the shot. For shots at the rim, the difference is true but not for jump shots.

I think you might be using the SportVu definition which DOES NOT include contest- i.e. hand in the face. SportVu's definition of contest is simply a few feet within the shooter, no hand up or down.

Actually I wasn't referring to the SportsVu data as opposed to compilations by CAC.


As the defender gets closer to the shooter, the shots get less and less efficient. What may surprise you, however, is the difference that just having a hand up can make. Across virtually every play type, having a hand up (CONTEST) vs. not having a hand up (PRESSURE) makes a significant difference. On POST shots, a pressured shot averages 54.3%, whereas a contested shot is only 42.3%. A contested screen and pop is 37.8% on average, compared to 50.5% when the shot is only pressured. Thatís over a 10% difference just from the defender putting a hand up.

http://www.d3coder.com/thecity/2012/10/11/hand-down-man-down-new-source-of-nba-data-reveals-critical-detail-for-more-effective-shot-defense/

Chronz
11-19-2014, 08:10 PM
Never leave your feet. This was the rule when we didn't have athletic freaks like Wilt/Russell to come along and change defenses, and they played in the paint. Im guessing your kids arent superb athletes so I would stick to the ground game fundamentals that were preached long ago.

Let me know how it goes tho, I want to coach kids some day.

PatsSoxKnicks
11-20-2014, 02:09 AM
Actually I wasn't referring to the SportsVu data as opposed to compilations by CAC.



http://www.d3coder.com/thecity/2012/10/11/hand-down-man-down-new-source-of-nba-data-reveals-critical-detail-for-more-effective-shot-defense/

Yeah I've read that. That's based on play types without location factored in. Look at the more recent research which is up to date with a larger sample size. Trust me- I've got pretty good experience with the Vantage data.

Raps08-09 Champ
11-20-2014, 02:14 AM
Make a lewd comment about their mom, wife, GF, etc before they release.

PatsSoxKnicks
11-20-2014, 02:16 AM
I meant on an individual basis when it comes to shot contesting, and passing lanes

Also, if you have a team like Miami, who is probably more athletic at each position, it can be a controlled gamble, because elite athletes can recover quicker, their teammates can recover quicker after the help, etc. Most teams aren't made up of that athletic content though..

Yeah shot contesting it's probably better to be a bit more passive. But at the team level, teams that play aggressive defense (helping aggressively, forcing turnovers, etc.) tend to be better. And of course, as you mentioned, most of those teams usually have the athletes to play that way. It probably does depend a bit on your personnel but there's no doubt those athletic teams who can play aggressive are usually better defensively.

Sadds The Gr8
11-20-2014, 06:21 AM
Lmao. The first time my buddy did that to me I shot the most disgusting airball. Over the long term though I would think thats a bad strategy because the shooter gets such a clean look at the basket.
Yea the first time my friend did it to me I was like "wtf are you doing lol?".

It's not something that'd work on a consistent basis but once In a while it can catch ppl off guard

numba1CHANGsta
11-20-2014, 06:33 AM
boobs.

ewing
11-20-2014, 08:51 AM
i can't believe people are saying never leave you feet :confused: anyway as a kid that was a solid defender but a little undersized one trick i learned was that on a lot of pull back shooters you can come from underneath and get a piece of the ball on the way up. this is particularly true if someone brings it up the middle or from the hip on a pull back off the bounce.

Corey
11-20-2014, 10:24 AM
Close out, choppy steps, hands up, dont jump. It's the way you're taught and it's the way coaches prefer. If you can chase them off the line and force a pass or a drive into traffic, you can rotate down and help on a PF/C as your big men rotate to help on the drive if they blow past your close out on the 3pt line.

I helped with high schoolers at camps all summer and Im coaching next season as well. I feel ya, KoB. Some kids have better reads than others, some you can trust to jump to make a block every now and then, but more often you'd rather have them stay feet on the ground. Too many bad things can happen if you jump to contest shots.

Wrigheyes4MVP
11-20-2014, 04:58 PM
I usually put my hand right in front of their face. I'm not tall enough to go for the block. Putting your head down toward midsection isn't good at all IMO. Just be in position so that you don't have to run at them with you head down and try to put your hand right in there face. You can usually do that without jumping too much so your still in good position after the shot (or pump fake). IDK though, just saying what works for me. Perimeter defense is my specialty and I'm pretty good at contesting shots. I feel like a hand right in the face is the most bothersome for shooters, especially coming from a guy who lacks the size to block the shot or bother them in that way.

At the end of the day, the key is to not be late when you contest the shot.

Wrigheyes4MVP
11-20-2014, 05:07 PM
Close out, choppy steps, hands up, dont jump. It's the way you're taught and it's the way coaches prefer. If you can chase them off the line and force a pass or a drive into traffic, you can rotate down and help on a PF/C as your big men rotate to help on the drive if they blow past your close out on the 3pt line.

I helped with high schoolers at camps all summer and Im coaching next season as well. I feel ya, KoB. Some kids have better reads than others, some you can trust to jump to make a block every now and then, but more often you'd rather have them stay feet on the ground. Too many bad things can happen if you jump to contest shots.

Its an instinct thing though. If you know for a fact the jump shot is coming and you are ready for it in a good position... I say jump away. The higher you get, usually the better the contest. Not jumping might be the way coaches teach and prefer, but if you are right on top of the shooter and you absolutely know the jumper is coming, use your instincts and contest the shot in the best way possible. Sometimes, that involves leaving your feet. And I'm not even talking about going for a block. I never go for the block personally. I just try to make it as difficult of a shot as possible without touching.

Munkeysuit
11-20-2014, 05:33 PM
Your actually supposed to stay low and close out high, meaning, when he's in the act of shooting, you keep your feet planted and have your hands raised as high as possible (usually over the face) and never try to block it from that position. The hand directly in the face method a la Shane Battier, works pretty well too, but I'd avoid getting too close with your arms because players are getting way too crafty with drawing fouls.

Bruno
11-20-2014, 06:03 PM
I think putting a hand up to block the vision of the shooter while avoiding contact is a good strategy. the battier.

surf and turf
11-20-2014, 06:32 PM
Do you jump to get the block?
Do you run at the shooter chopping your feet to get a hand in the face?
Do you run past with your head down toward their midsection?

Do you think one method is significantly better and why? Does anyone know if there is any research?

If your closing out you sprint with one hand up but your last two steps are chops in case he tries to go by you.

But honestly tgere is no defense against a pure jump shooter besides being close enough to him that when he gets the ball he can't fire. I'm a pure jump shooter. I teach shooting and can give a 12 hour lecture on it...at least. If I get to the top of my jump and your block hand is more then 2 inches away from me your dead. And even if you time my jump I can release early and still bury you.

All kinds of jumpers though that require different defenses to try and slow down. Pure shooter should be able to catch a pass moving full speed like off a screen even if his back it to the basket...off the dribble..from a pass..and from triple threat

JustinTime
11-20-2014, 08:39 PM
Do you jump to get the block?
Do you run at the shooter chopping your feet to get a hand in the face?
Do you run past with your head down toward their midsection?

Do you think one method is significantly better and why? Does anyone know if there is any research?

It's all about F*cking with your opponents head. I'll play off someone and defend the drive until they can prove to me they can shoot. If they can shoot I will definitely jump and try to block them if I feel I can do it without fouling. If they are bigger than me then I will crowd them and deny them from ever getting the ball and if they do I'll pretend to poke them in the eye or stick a hand in their face so they can't see to **** with their head. I do all types of things to defend people It really depends on the situation but I'm lock down when I play.

KnicksorBust
11-20-2014, 10:09 PM
Never leave your feet. This was the rule when we didn't have athletic freaks like Wilt/Russell to come along and change defenses, and they played in the paint. Im guessing your kids arent superb athletes so I would stick to the ground game fundamentals that were preached long ago.

Let me know how it goes tho, I want to coach kids some day.

You got it. I am also implementing the triangle offense. Really experimenting with some things this season.

KnicksorBust
11-20-2014, 10:10 PM
Close out, choppy steps, hands up, dont jump. It's the way you're taught and it's the way coaches prefer. If you can chase them off the line and force a pass or a drive into traffic, you can rotate down and help on a PF/C as your big men rotate to help on the drive if they blow past your close out on the 3pt line.

I helped with high schoolers at camps all summer and Im coaching next season as well. I feel ya, KoB. Some kids have better reads than others, some you can trust to jump to make a block every now and then, but more often you'd rather have them stay feet on the ground. Too many bad things can happen if you jump to contest shots.

great post. The last sentence is the real motivation behind the new strategy.

PatsSoxKnicks
11-21-2014, 01:34 AM
You got it. I am also implementing the triangle offense. Really experimenting with some things this season.

Coach Nick over at Bballbreakdown is an expert on the Triangle. Should ask him for some advice.

KnicksorBust
11-22-2014, 12:55 AM
You got it. I am also implementing the triangle offense. Really experimenting with some things this season.

Coach Nick over at Bballbreakdown is an expert on the Triangle. Should ask him for some advice.

Good call. I actually have seen all his videos on the triangle. I compiled a mixture of about 15 videos for my youtube channel that I will share with my team and I put two of his triangle videos and the video about How to Ice the PnR. :)

PatsSoxKnicks
11-22-2014, 10:14 PM
Good call. I actually have seen all his videos on the triangle. I compiled a mixture of about 15 videos for my youtube channel that I will share with my team and I put two of his triangle videos and the video about How to Ice the PnR. :)

Yeah I've seen his Triangle videos. Really good stuff. Going to talk to him about it when I see him next.

JasonJohnHorn
11-22-2014, 11:06 PM
:laugh: Did you go back, edit, and add Ricky Rubio and Austin Rivers? I could have sworn the first time I read it you just wrote Josh Smith. Maybe I read too quickly.

You are right.... I left them off at first... lol

KingstonHawke
11-22-2014, 11:38 PM
100% depends on the situation. I'm a shot blocker naturally, which you wouldn't expect with me being 5'10... but I have a 76 inch wingspan so it surprises people what I can get to. But normally when I'm on ball and stat chasing I wont leave my feet. I'll contest, turn into them so they come down boxed out, and then I go after the rebound. If I'm not looking to rebound and I'm not worried about a blow by (maybe I have help, or energy) then I'll leave my feet at times. Usually wont get to it, but if I've blocked them on a blow by that I've chased down (I get most of my blocks chasing someone who's gotten by me and focusing on the hand furthest from my help) then I notice they react a little more to my block attempt.

When I play real high level players, they are more bothered by ego than a hand in their face, so I'll just give them room and try for low percentage shots. May even talk and play super physical. Black guys (I'm black) will jack up nonsense, white guys sometimes get intimidated. On offense I'm really only bothered on my gather. If you come late doesn't usually affect me. Kobe's my favorite player and he get's blocked a ton so when I was young I learned to take my shot how I would alone and make the defense make the play instead of adjusting and doing the work for him. I'll take some extra blocks, but I feel like my % is better.

RaiderKid318
11-23-2014, 12:30 AM
Cup their nuts in your hand and hope they miss

Funniest **** I have seen all week lol

jerellh528
11-23-2014, 12:36 AM
You can only hope they miss. If they don't have thier dribble you can go for the block, otherwise I would maybe try to put my hand in their path of vision

KnicksorBust
12-19-2014, 09:04 PM
Let me know how it goes tho, I want to coach kids some day.

My triangle offense and contest without leaving your feet defense got the opening night dub. 48-40. Thanks guys

Kashmir13579
12-20-2014, 03:48 AM
Get a hand up

KnicksorBust
12-20-2014, 10:45 AM
Get a hand up

Thats the plan. My guys did not leave their feet the whole game and opponents only hit 2 threes.