PDA

View Full Version : Worst Decisions to Enter the NBA Draft?



NoahH
03-28-2014, 01:45 PM
With Zach LaVine recently confirming he's entering the draft, it made me think back to some of the players who really could have stayed a couple more years in college.

Who do you think could have benefitted from an extra year or two in college (or going to college in general) instead of sitting at the end of an NBA bench?

Jamal Sampson - this dude had a horrendous year at Cal before declaring for the draft. He got drafted in the second round and he just never got it going.

Byron Mullens - He didn't do much at Ohio St. in his first year, yet he still declared. It took him a few years before even being RELEVANT in the NBA, and he still sucks.


Who do you guys have on your list?

dru_562
03-28-2014, 02:00 PM
When I think about this question I think Austin Rivers could of used another year or two in college.

Ebbs
03-28-2014, 02:01 PM
Kwame Brown

Nocioni5
03-28-2014, 02:11 PM
Marcuis Teague. He could have used a couple more years in college.

NoahH
03-28-2014, 02:12 PM
When I think about this question I think Austin Rivers could of used another year or two in college.

Good call. Austin Rivers definitely could have used a year or two to work on his shooting!

Raps18-19 Champ
03-28-2014, 02:40 PM
Last year's draft, Kabongo. Should've definitely stayed the whole 4 years.

SugeKnight
03-28-2014, 02:51 PM
Zach made a good decision IMO. Hopefully he falls to a good team that can develop his talent

jerellh528
03-28-2014, 02:53 PM
How much different is a top level college program and an nba team for developing talent?

SugeKnight
03-28-2014, 02:54 PM
Staying a few more years would have helped Harrison Barnes. He would be entering this draft if he stayed 4 years

ramsizzle
03-28-2014, 02:55 PM
Ndudi Ebi could've been a great player with college under his belt. i will always stand by this.

abe_froman
03-28-2014, 02:59 PM
How much different is a top level college program and an nba team for developing talent?
not much

DreamShaker
03-28-2014, 03:11 PM
How much different is a top level college program and an nba team for developing talent?

Sometimes it's about maturity. College is for young kids, pros are for men. Some guys come in way over their heads and aren't ready to take a backseat.

Telfair is a guy that comes to mind for me. He had that big documentary and all that hype and was not close to ready.

ManRam
03-28-2014, 03:27 PM
I'm less convinced that it has to do with them leaving early than just the fact that most of these guys just never really had it. We can say "they weren't ready", but for most of the names mentioned I'm just not convinced they really ever had the natural ability, talent or drive. You have it or you don't, and no amount of college ball can change that. There might be some mental/maturity issues at play, but I don't think we have the knowledge as outsiders to discern that on a case-by-case basis.

How certain are we that staying in college is better for development than getting to the NBA? I'm not convinced. Too many variables. Too many examples of every outcome there is happening. It's not like NBA teams aren't pouring time and resources into their youth to develop them. They might not be getting 30 minutes a game over ~35 games that year, but they're still certainly being worked on.


LaVine is a good case. With him it's all upside and potential. I want the Magic to gamble on him because a) we're not gonna rebuild in a hurry without hitting on some gambles and b) his athleticism and shooting ability just have me drooling. He might not be "NBA ready", but he has the tools. I don't think staying a year could hurt, but who's to say it will help?

dhopisthename
03-28-2014, 03:29 PM
How much different is a top level college program and an nba team for developing talent?

in college you have a full time classes and limited practice time, but get the full time playing but that is limited to 30 games. In the nba all you have to worry about is getting better, can practice as much as you want, but might not get any real playing time. so its really player to player which is better.

Hawkeye15
03-28-2014, 03:32 PM
I am of the impression that every year spent in college is bad for a future pro. You develop much faster at the NBA level than you would staying an extra year or two in college.

http://insider.espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/10588150/nba-why-nba-develops-players-better-college

perfect article to describe the reasoning.

D-Leethal
03-28-2014, 03:33 PM
Worst decision to NOT enter the draft: Jared Sullinger.

Hawkeye15
03-28-2014, 03:33 PM
in college you have a full time classes and limited practice time, but get the full time playing but that is limited to 30 games. In the nba all you have to worry about is getting better, can practice as much as you want, but might not get any real playing time. so its really player to player which is better.

unless you go to UNC haha.

DreamShaker
03-28-2014, 03:37 PM
I'm less convinced that it has to do with them leaving early than just the fact that most of these guys just never really had it. We can say "they weren't ready", but for most of the names mentioned I'm just not convinced they really ever had the natural ability, talent or drive. You have it or you don't, and no amount of college ball can change that. There might be some mental/maturity issues at play, but I don't think we have the knowledge as outsiders to discern that on a case-by-case basis.

How certain are we that staying in college is better for development than getting to the NBA? I'm not convinced. Too many variables. Too many examples of every outcome there is happening. It's not like NBA teams aren't pouring time and resources into their youth to develop them. They might not be getting 30 minutes a game over ~35 games that year, but they're still certainly being worked on.


LaVine is a good case. With him it's all upside and potential. I want the Magic to gamble on him because a) we're not gonna rebuild in a hurry without hitting on some gambles and b) his athleticism and shooting ability just have me drooling. He might not be "NBA ready", but he has the tools. I don't think staying a year could hurt, but who's to say it will help?

The right situation can change everything for someone. Look at Lance Stephenson. He is likely out of the NBA if Larry Bird didn't mentor him like he did, and stay patient with him. I think nothing is black and white. It all depends on the person and the opportunities they were given.

Trueblue2
03-28-2014, 04:05 PM
I'm less convinced that it has to do with them leaving early than just the fact that most of these guys just never really had it. We can say "they weren't ready", but for most of the names mentioned I'm jus. not convinced they really ever had the natural ability, talent or drive. You have it or you don't, and no amount of college ball can change that. There might be some mental/maturity issues at play, but I don't think we have the knowledge as outsiders to discern that on a case-by-case basis.

How certain are we that staying in college is better for development than getting to the NBA? I'm not convinced. Too many variables. Too many examples of every outcome there is happening. It's not like NBA teams aren't pouring time and resources into their youth to develop them. They might not be getting 30 minutes a game over ~35 games that year, but they're still certainly being worked on.


LaVine is a good case. With him it's all upside and potential. I want the Magic to gamble on him because a) we're not gonna rebuild in a hurry without hitting on some gambles and b) his athleticism and shooting ability just have me drooling. He might not be "NBA ready", but he has the tools. I don't think staying a year could hurt, but who's to say it will help?

I agree that you either have it or you don't, but playing your rookie season after 4 years of college means you're 2-3 years older than most rookies from the same draft class. Entering the league at 21/22 as opposed to 18/19 means your body is more or less done growing and you've either reached your genetic potential or you know what it is. Entering the league knowing what physical tools you have to work with let's you find a style of play that fits those tools, work on skills specific to that play style, and contribute immediately.

People say that certain players should stay in school to work on their game, but you can work on your game in the NBA. There's no way anyone can convince me that nba coaching and competition is less condusive to player development than college. The real reason anyone should stay in college is to come into the NBA as a full grown man so you can focus completely on developing skills that suit your stature rather than also having to work to get your body to reach its physical potential.

Also players arent really compared by age, they're compared by draft class. If someone comes in after 4 years and produces right away gms and coaches see a guy that came into the league and contributed as a rookie, which buys you playing time and more opportunities to show that you have it down the road.

Stunner
03-28-2014, 04:08 PM
Delete

Stunner
03-28-2014, 04:08 PM
I think the Bulls will take Zach

abe_froman
03-28-2014, 04:10 PM
I think the Bulls will take Zach

dunno if he'll slip that far.he's a possibility,but could go as high as late lotto(seen him go anywhere from 10-the early 2nd round in most mocks)

dhopisthename
03-28-2014, 05:25 PM
unless you go to UNC haha.

yes that is very true. In fact its a well know fact that for 1 and done that the year in college is a joke they just take cakewalk classes where showing up for the test(and less if the teachers know who you are and let you slide) gets you a passing grade. then the 2nd sememster they don't even care and just pick classes know they won't ever show up for

NBA_Starter
03-28-2014, 09:02 PM
William Avery

MrfadeawayJB
03-28-2014, 09:12 PM
Most recently Anthony Bennett. He needed to develop his handles and outside shot before declaring

Yankeefan213
03-29-2014, 08:57 AM
Deshaun Thomas should have stayed another year at Ohio State. Is he even on a roster right now?

Cal827
03-29-2014, 09:01 AM
Shabbaz

MonroeFAN
03-29-2014, 10:04 AM
I actually think another year of school would have been a bad idea for Shabbaz.

b_russ
03-29-2014, 11:25 AM
It's surprising how split people's opinions are about to stay or go on here. I thought I would be in the minority having the opinion that it is better to enter the draft. The reasons that others have mentioned I agree with, and to add to that you have to consider potential injuries as another factor (see Mitch McGary.) You can get those same injuries in the NBA but at least you're getting paid for it on a salary that if should choose to go back to school because your NBA career isn't going to pan out you can afford to do so.

One can argue that Doug McDermott only helped his stock by staying in school. That's true, but did he even have a chance to make a team if he came out after his freshman or sophomore season? Those high school All-Americans that used to be able to declare straight out of high school most of the time enter college only as a stepping stool to enter the league and as others have mentioned their year in college is generally a joke. Why is it that the perception of going to the NBA early derails their maturity? It definitely can, but it also gives them a chance to surround themselves with veteran professionals focusing on improving their game instead of the sideshows that college can present. Don't get me wrong, both have their pros and cons, but it seems to me that the NBA offers more on how to be an NBA player than college does.

Good points though that others have brought up about being in the right situation. With the draft you really don't have a say in who drafts you and what system you get put into. Where with college, you do have that choice to analyze the coaches and teammates to see what suits you best, although it seems most kids' choice is based on what's going to give them the most exposure (another sign that they're in it for the NBA in the first place, not to be at school.)

b_russ
03-29-2014, 11:37 AM
Deshaun Thomas should have stayed another year at Ohio State. Is he even on a roster right now?

He went to Europe to develop and is having a stellar year. Smart on his part to leave.

mike_noodles
03-29-2014, 11:41 AM
Eddy Curry comes to mind. He should have gone to college. Of course it's easy to name any high schooler that never reached their full potential.