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View Full Version : Stars Are Staying Back in School to Get Ahead in Basketball



BALLER R
07-13-2013, 12:34 AM
Saw this today and was wondering whats everyone thought on this. Have you guys heard about this before?

View Video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-S4aByi1Og&feature=youtu.be)

mjt20mik
07-13-2013, 12:47 AM
crazy..

scissors
07-13-2013, 01:12 AM
In our program we recommend everybody do it. It is also advantageous for academic and social development as well. Why rush to go to off to college when you could get a better scholarship for sports, music and academics while growing up a little more in the process.

Cubs Win
07-13-2013, 01:15 AM
Didn't Wiggins do the opposite? I think he was originally high school class of '14 but reclassified to '13? I don't know for sure it that's correct because I don't remember his exact reasoning (other than he's obviously probably ready).

shep33
07-13-2013, 01:28 AM
I don't mind it in all truth. Nothing illegal about it, and I mean an extra year in highschool + another year in college means that they're probably more mature human beings too.

amos1er
07-13-2013, 01:32 AM
Both Kobe and Lebron would have been better had they went to college for at least three years IMO. Both would have had a better chance at surpassing Jordan.

bholly
07-13-2013, 01:53 AM
Both Kobe and Lebron would have been better had they went to college for at least three years IMO. Both would have had a better chance at surpassing Jordan.

If you actually followed the link or read the thread you'd know this thread isn't about players staying in college.

dhopisthename
07-13-2013, 02:02 AM
isn't this just what shabazz did, but he just lied about it?

bholly
07-13-2013, 02:02 AM
Didn't Wiggins do the opposite? I think he was originally high school class of '14 but reclassified to '13? I don't know for sure it that's correct because I don't remember his exact reasoning (other than he's obviously probably ready).

They're talking about staying back a year in middle school so that you're older in high school. According to Jalen Rose in the video, Wiggins (and also Nerlens Noel and a bunch of others) stayed back in middle school so they're a year older, and then reclassified in high school so they could graduate at the right time based on their age - so you're right, but missed the first part.

BALLER R
07-13-2013, 02:05 AM
It's pretty smart and honestly there isn't a downside to it.

shep33
07-13-2013, 02:26 AM
It's pretty smart and honestly there isn't a downside to it.

Yup. I agree with Jalen and Jacoby in the video. No downside, and when a high quality education is so expensive, why not try it?

jimm120
07-13-2013, 02:52 AM
I don't mind it in all truth. Nothing illegal about it, and I mean an extra year in highschool + another year in college means that they're probably more mature human beings too.

No. You didn't understand.

Its simply that it makes them more attractive to scouts/schools for 2 reasons:

1 - They're more physically mature than the other players at their level.
2 - They're more experienced than the other players at their level.

Remember, at these ages, 1 year is A LOT.

Think of this like the MLB minor leagues. A 21 year old in AAA is much more impressive than a 25 year old in AAA.

In the NBA, though, its a wiggle room of only 1 year. But this 1 year is a big difference for the level......but for teams, 1 year isn't much (as in ready for the nba). No difference. But for high school, having that extra year or playing against lower competition allows you to stand out more.


That's the thing with this.


EDIT:

This issue isn't about having an extra year making you more mature/better basketball player.
This issue is about standing out more to scouts/universities even though all you did was play against players of lower competition.



Again, back to baseball: get an MLB player that's somebody that's simply average and send them to the minors. They'll be above the rest or one of the best in the minors.

Another analogy could be the NBA Developmental league. You send someone like Iman Shumpert, Paul George, or Kwahi Leonard to the NBA DL, they'll look much better and stand out compared to those other guys.

Its artificial inflation of talent.

jimm120
07-13-2013, 03:01 AM
Yup. I agree with Jalen and Jacoby in the video. No downside, and when a high quality education is so expensive, why not try it?

There is downside....for the overall thing, not at the personal level.

Its positive for the players and no downside to them.
Its negative for rest of the players that ARE playing at their own levels.

shep33
07-13-2013, 04:09 AM
No. You didn't understand.

Its simply that it makes them more attractive to scouts/schools for 2 reasons:

1 - They're more physically mature than the other players at their level.
2 - They're more experienced than the other players at their level.

Remember, at these ages, 1 year is A LOT.

Think of this like the MLB minor leagues. A 21 year old in AAA is much more impressive than a 25 year old in AAA.

In the NBA, though, its a wiggle room of only 1 year. But this 1 year is a big difference for the level......but for teams, 1 year isn't much (as in ready for the nba). No difference. But for high school, having that extra year or playing against lower competition allows you to stand out more.


That's the thing with this.


EDIT:

This issue isn't about having an extra year making you more mature/better basketball player.
This issue is about standing out more to scouts/universities even though all you did was play against players of lower competition.



Again, back to baseball: get an MLB player that's somebody that's simply average and send them to the minors. They'll be above the rest or one of the best in the minors.

Another analogy could be the NBA Developmental league. You send someone like Iman Shumpert, Paul George, or Kwahi Leonard to the NBA DL, they'll look much better and stand out compared to those other guys.

Its artificial inflation of talent.


For me, it doesn't make a huge difference because you can't jump from high school to the pros. College is the barrier that separates talent. Although these kids might be a bit older, they still have 0 experience for the college game.

When it comes to drafting players, I honestly don't think its a huge issue. Guys like Noel are going against older and more physically developed players in college all the time.

That one year will help star high schoolers get into better programs, but lets remember that a majority of these kids were already likely to go to a good program. The players that skip a year are typically the ones that have already been scouted and have gained interest from schools. They're already some of the better players in the country.

shep33
07-13-2013, 04:15 AM
There is downside....for the overall thing, not at the personal level.

Its positive for the players and no downside to them.
Its negative for rest of the players that ARE playing at their own levels.

Won't disagree with you there. However, in the cases where a younger player can compete with another player who stayed back a year, the younger player has a huge advantage when it comes to college scouts and potential draft value since they're a year younger.

IgglesFanInCO
07-13-2013, 05:47 AM
For me, it doesn't make a huge difference because you can't jump from high school to the pros. College is the barrier that separates talent. Although these kids might be a bit older, they still have 0 experience for the college game.

When it comes to drafting players, I honestly don't think its a huge issue. Guys like Noel are going against older and more physically developed players in college all the time.

That one year will help star high schoolers get into better programs, but lets remember that a majority of these kids were already likely to go to a good program. The players that skip a year are typically the ones that have already been scouted and have gained interest from schools. They're already some of the better players in the country.

I dont think the problem lies at the NBA level, I think the problem people may have with this is for the college level, those kids that are getting overlooked by playing at their level instead of going down a level are being put at not only a disadvantage for a college basketball career, but a college education, with methods like this allowed it will sacrifice many childrens potential educations as they could not afford it otherwise, its an ethical quandary not a pragmatic one

jam
07-13-2013, 06:54 AM
They would have been better players for sure, but it would've been a huge hit to their stat totals, as well as to their bottom line.

Jordan's fundamentals are in fact, the best we've ever seen in the game of basketball, by a very wide margin.


Both Kobe and Lebron would have been better had they went to college for at least three years IMO. Both would have had a better chance at surpassing Jordan.

2-ONE-5
07-13-2013, 08:44 AM
this has been going on for a looong time. its nothing new but its not right and i blame the parents.