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Chronz
03-19-2013, 01:30 PM
New York, Orlando, Boston, Washington, Milwaukee, Toronto, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Dallas, Oklahoma City, Minnesota, Golden State, Houston, San Antonio, and Phoenix.

Those are the 15 teams that have installed SportsVU cameras in their arenas.

Check out the latest Grantland piece on the next wave of stats that teams are looking into.

http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/9068903/the-toronto-raptors-sportvu-cameras-nba-analytical-revolution


Fifteen NBA teams have purchased the cameras, which cost about $100,000 per year, from STATS LLC; turning those X-Y coordinates into useful data is the main challenge those teams face.1

Some teams are just starting with the cameras, while others that bought them right away are far ahead and asking very interesting questions. Those 15 teams have been very secretive in revealing how they've used the data, but one team that has made serious progress — the Toronto Raptors — opened up the black box in a series of meetings this month with Grantland.

The future of the NBA, at least in one place, looks like this:


The code can recognize everything — when a pick-and-roll occurred, where it occurred, whether the pick actually hit a defender, and the position of all 10 players on the floor as the play unfolded. The team also factored in the individual skill set of every NBA player, so the program understands that Chris Paul is much more dangerous from midrange than Rajon Rondo, and that Roy Hibbert is taller than Al Horford.2

That last bit — the ability to recognize individual player skills — is crucial for the juiciest bit of what the Raptors have accomplished: those clear circles that sort of follow the Toronto players around and have the same jersey numbers. Those are ghost players, and they are doing what Toronto's coaching staff and analytics team believe the players should have done on this play — and on every other Toronto play the cameras have recorded.3 The system has factored in Toronto's actual scheme and the expected point value of every possession as play evolves.4 The team could use that expected value system to build an "ideal" NBA defense irrespective of the Toronto scheme, but doing so today would be pointless, since part of the team's job is to sell a sometimes skeptical coaching staff on the value of all these new numbers and computer programs, says Alex Rucker, the Raptors' director of analytics.

This should make quantifying defensive errors alot easier...... well at least for NBA teams


Ghost DeRozan has left Kidd to slam into Chandler much earlier, and much higher on the floor, than Real DeRozan actually did. Since Anthony is dribbling toward the right side of the floor, the left side becomes the "weak" side, and it is the duty of the weakside defender in almost every NBA defense to help on the big man (Chandler) rolling to the paint. DeRozan does that here, but he does it too late; doing so earlier would stop Chandler sooner and allow both DeRozan and Jonas Valanciunas (no. 17) to retreat more easily to their original marks.



"Anybody who is going to pooh-pooh this kind of analysis will say things like, 'You can't measure defense, because it's all about the guy who doesn't help or rotate,'" says Keith Boyarsky, the team's technical director of analytics. "That it's about what you can't measure. But that's exactly what we're measuring."

Chronz
03-19-2013, 01:34 PM
More ....


"Even though basketball is essentially five guys guarding the ball, it's hard to get players away from the concept of, 'This is my guy.'"

Having players a foot or two out of position can be fatal to a defense, says Tom Sterner, a Raptors assistant and something of a tech guru.5 "The players are just so quick in the NBA," Sterner says. "One or two feet can make a huge difference."

Ultra-aggressive help defense is really hard work. Replay that clip and watch how far DeRozan's ghost has to move as the Knicks swing the ball. That's brutal, and it's not a coincidence that the only team that consistently mirrors the help defense of its ghosts is Miami, Rucker says. The Heat have three of the best wing defenders in the league in Shane Battier, LeBron James, and Dwyane Wade, and the latter two are among the NBA's most gifted pure athletes. James can mimic DeRozan's hyperactive ghost in a way no other player can, Rucker says. "LeBron basically messes up the system and the ghosts," Rucker says. "He does things that are just unsustainable for most players."

Sadds The Gr8
03-19-2013, 01:38 PM
yea I listened to Zach Lowe's podcast on the analytics in basketball with Daryl Morey and other ppl. I was surprised to hear the Raptors use this. But they still suck *** anyways

Chronz
03-19-2013, 01:43 PM
yea I listened to Zach Lowe's podcast on the analytics in basketball with Daryl Morey and other ppl. I was surprised to hear the Raptors use this. But they still suck *** anyways
Yeah its been around for abit but we only get to see so much.

Link me to the podcast if you can bro . I just left the house and could use something to listen to on my commute

Sadds The Gr8
03-19-2013, 03:00 PM
Yeah its been around for abit but we only get to see so much.

Link me to the podcast if you can bro . I just left the house and could use something to listen to on my commute

http://espn.go.com/espnradio/grantland/player?id=9012769

el hidalgo
03-19-2013, 03:06 PM
sounds like more hollinger witchcraft invented to discredit kobe and credit lebron

D-Leethal
03-19-2013, 03:07 PM
my oh my Chronz just got a boner

JiffyMix88
03-19-2013, 03:19 PM
**** sounds lame players still got to go out and execute

edit: why it's lame to me I think players will get caught over thinking and will cost them in some situations, for example when they are expecting a pick in roll but the guy splits instead. Players have a mind of their own and I think the owners are doing too much.

Chronz
03-19-2013, 03:44 PM
**** sounds lame players still got to go out and execute

edit: why it's lame to me I think players will get caught over thinking and will cost them in some situations, for example when they are expecting a pick in roll but the guy splits instead. Players have a mind of their own and I think the owners are doing too much.
There are plenty who agree with you, including the GMs in charge.

You have to know your personnel. Shane Battier has described how pointless it was to show Ron Artest a thorough scouting report. Saying that you can't cage a pitbull. But thats Artest, a complex thinker like Battier can make better use of the information.

Still that is only one aspect of this technology. The biggest gains will be for those who can use it to identify underrated positional defenders and elite floor spacers.