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Chronz
01-02-2013, 02:54 PM
Insider but thought Id post some snippets
http://insider.espn.go.com/nba/story/_/page/PerDiem-130101/nba-ranking-team-corner-3s

Of all the pillars of the analytics movement that are currently consuming the NBA world, few are more powerful than this one: Where you take shots is almost as important as whether you make shots. Smart shot selection has been a point of emphasis for coaches ever since Dr. James Naismith hung up the first peach basket. But now we have the data to drive the most salient points home. We've learned a lot by looking at the hard data, and it has smartened up the game some. If the midrange game is dying, the blood is on the hands of stat geeks who helped expose their relatively low payoff. But the single most important shot in the game still barely gets any attention at all:

The corner 3.

A corner 3-point shot this season has yielded 1.16 points on average. Your average midrange shot? 0.78 points. That might not seem like a lot on the surface, but it adds up over an entire season.

Generally speaking, exchanging just three midrange shots for three corner 3s per game would yield about 100 additional points over the course of a season. To put some perspective on that, 100 points is roughly equivalent to the difference between the sixth-ranked Miami Heat offense and the 13th-ranked Portland Trail Blazers offense last season (85 points separated them). That is why the midrange game is dying and corner 3s are thriving; shooting 15-foot jumpers is a losing affair compared to other shots.

Not buying the gospel of the corner 3? Believe it or not, a team's frequency of corner 3s is more closely linked to successful offenses than the frequency of shots in the restricted area, even though they boast similar payoffs (1.16 points per shot versus 1.19 points per shot, respectively). In fact, when we look at shot frequency from the five shot areas on the floor designated by NBA.com's StatsCube -- restricted-area, in the paint non-restricted-area, midrange, corner 3s and above-the-break 3s -- the strongest correlation with offensive efficiency over the past 17 seasons is the corner 3-pointer.



Is your team reliant on the corner 3? Does your team excel in the midrange area?

I found it interesting that OKC has the best offense in the league yet rarely take the corner 3. San Antonio has the most corner 3 players, dating back to the Bowen days they have always had a corner sniper, this helps us understand why they have gotten the most out of their talent over the years.

JasonJohnHorn
01-02-2013, 03:04 PM
I think this article goes about it the wrong way. Yes, corner three are effecctive because usually when people are taking them they are wide open. It's all about having effective scorers in the post and driving. Duncan and Parker are great examples. Either one draws the double team, kicks it out to Manu, who kicks it out to Leonard and all of a sudden there is a guy open in the corner.

If you didn't have the guy that could score in the post, and the PG driving the lane, the defenses wouldn't collapse and that corner three isn't open.

The corner three is the prodcut of a well executed offence and the extra pass. If you don't have all those things in place, a corner three isn't going to help.

And most shooters agree, the corner three is the hardest shot to hit on the floor. People only take it when the have to (because the clock is running out) or because they are open.

People don't run a play for the corner three. They run a play for another shot, and when the defences scramble to cover they move the ball to the open man.


This article makes it sound like if you just take three's from the corner you are going to win, and there is so much more work that goes into those corner threes that the simple act of shooting it.

Case and point: Bruce Bowen. Completely useless on every roster he was on untilo he got to the Spurs, who had everythign in place to make him effective on offense.

And as Chronz pointed out, OKC has one of the best offences in the game and they don't use the corner three much.

I think the most important shot in the game, may be the free throw. So many games are decided by who makes more free throws. That is an underrated shot.

Chronz
01-02-2013, 03:16 PM
And most shooters agree, the corner three is the hardest shot to hit on the floor. People only take it when the have to (because the clock is running out) or because they are open.
What do you mean? The hardest shot is the midrange-longrange 2. Its why the best defenses are geared to making you take those and geared towards taking away the corner 3.
I highly doubt Thibs places an emphasis on defending the corner 3 if its a hard shot to hit. Battier has mentioned this before, he knows in his head the shot he wants people taking are long range 2's and the shot he never tries to give up is the corner 3.


People don't run a play for the corner three. They run a play for another shot, and when the defences scramble to cover they move the ball to the open man.
Pretty sure teams run plays to free up the highest% shots, defenses are geared towards making you take the lowest% shot.



Case and point: Bruce Bowen. Completely useless on every roster he was on untilo he got to the Spurs, who had everythign in place to make him effective on offense.

Doesn't that show you how important the corner 3 is? The Spurs drill every wing player they get into maximizing their efficiency from that slot. Bowen, Leonard. I mean, you dont see Pop trying to get them to become midrange specialist do you?


And as Chronz pointed out, OKC has one of the best offences in the game and they don't use the corner three much.

Yea but what does it tell you when they are in the minority?

bholly
01-02-2013, 06:18 PM
I read this yesterday, so it's not exactly fresh in my mind anymore, but I thought it was pretty good. From memory my quick criticisms were:

1) He didn't really consider (or at least discuss) the causality properly. While I absolutely buy that, in a vacuum, the corner three is a great shot, I'm not quite as comfortable with ignoring the extent to which the correlation could come from the better offenses getting open in the corners more often. While most teams could really benefit from looking for the corner three more, I think if they just read this article and try to start taking as many of them as San Antonio or MIA, while staying in their current offensive schemes otherwise, then they're going to be taking bad corner threes and it could well hurt them overall. In short, I guess I think there needs to be more emphasis on running an offense that can get you good corner threes, particularly open ones, and having the personell to hit them - rather than just 'corner threes are great!' which has been well covered and comes with the implication that every offense should be trying to shoot as many as they can.

2) I was surprised that he didn't mention the added benefit of increased offensive rebounding on threes over mid-range jumpers. That's one of the big benefits, and I'm sure Haberstroh knows it, so weird to omit it.

I guess both issues could come from the fact that these are written for the ESPN frontpage, and thus more casual fans than the people Haberstroh himself would really read, so I guess maybe just 'corner threes are good because you get more points!' is the level he has to write to - but it's still a bummer.

TheNumber37
01-02-2013, 06:35 PM
The Corner shot is often the last shot the defense can give you after they rotate and you pass around the rotation.

IF your team shoots it well (over 45% from the corner) then your team is hard to beat.

kozelkid
01-02-2013, 06:51 PM
This was the first shot that Thibs made Deng utilize the moment he came here to Chicago. Before that, Deng was shooting the most inefficient shot in basketball: the long 2.

D-Leethal
01-06-2013, 10:45 PM
Corner 3 is the easiest 3 to make, along with the 45 deg. mark. Obviously it varies but I'm pretty sure everything out there points to the corner 3 being most effective and its the closest distance. Clyde references that in Knicks games all the time. Corner 3 has been a big part of our offense since D'Antoni dog days. Great for spacing and deadly when you have guys who require double teams.