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View Full Version : Do scorekeepers follow a textbook rule for assists, or can it vary?



Mamba Sting
12-17-2012, 02:38 PM
I was just wondering the accuracy of assists that a player is awarded. Is there a textbook definition of what an assist is that scorekeepers have to follow? This kind of reminds me of errors in baseball, but not quite as extreme (becuase they are both at the discretion of the scorekeeper).

i would imagine some players would get superstar treatment just as the stars do on the court. a scorekeeper for a player like rondo might be more lax on what he calls an assist, because big assist nights are exciting and the streak is a cool thing.

do you think assists awarded accurately shows how many times the player was responsible for setting up a FG?

ILLUSIONIST^248
12-17-2012, 03:10 PM
Excellent question . I've always wondered this.

2-ONE-5
12-17-2012, 04:02 PM
my understanding is that the ball has to be scored in 2 or less dribbles for an assist to added to the basket

JNA17
12-17-2012, 04:10 PM
I'm probably going to sound like a hater but I remember questioning most of Lebron's assists when he passes to guys like Wade or Haslem and they take like five seconds to finally shoot the ball and Lebron somehow gets the assist for it.

I thought it was 2 dribbles or less? Or 3 seconds or less?

sep11ie
12-17-2012, 04:15 PM
2 dribbles or 2 steps.

IndyRealist
12-17-2012, 04:24 PM
Yes and yes. There is a textbook definition, but scoring it varies by the statistician.

LongWayFromHome
12-17-2012, 05:55 PM
The NBA statistician's manual says an assist should be "credited to a player tossing the last pass leading directly to a field goal, only if the player scoring the goal responds by demonstrating immediate reaction to the basket." It sounds simple enough. As assist is a pass made to a shooter who scores. But when you try to apply this definition during a game, it gets murky. There are no details about how many steps shooters can take after receiving a pass; nothing about shot-fakes, head-fakes or pivot moves and no hard guidelines on how much time can elapse between the pass and the shot.

"You follow the rules," says David Einspahr, a statistician with the Denver Nuggets, "but there's going to be a lot of judgment calls."

Chronz
12-17-2012, 05:59 PM
Interpretations can be subjective but a good way to test for bias is to compare home/away splits. Over 82 games if there is a distinct difference (Like Rondo), you can tell when some players may be getting padded stats.

They used to have a text book definition but Im glad they got more liberal with assist, playmakers were under valued if their pass didn't immediately lead to a shot.

LongWayFromHome
12-17-2012, 05:59 PM
Here's a really good read about the topic.

http://deadspin.com/5345287/the-confessions-of-an-nba-scorekeeper

SirSkyHook
12-17-2012, 06:14 PM
Nope they just wing it just like turnovers. Ive seen in the last week guys fumble very catchable passes than drop them but the passer gets the turnover. Also a players catch it take a dribble all in one motion off the pass but drop it off their feet and boxscore listed as turnover on the passer. I was curious about it also a week and a half ago so every game i watch now i watch it with the boxscore up on the internet to see how they score things lol

king4day
12-17-2012, 06:16 PM
I really wish they'd add the 'hockey assist'. Call it something else, but it would help show ball movement. If a team finishes with 10-15 hockey assists, they had a very fluid game and it likely wasn't sloppy.

rocket
12-17-2012, 06:22 PM
Thought an assist was when they pass the ball to a player and they score within 5 seconds lol

Mamba Sting
12-19-2012, 11:49 PM
Interpretations can be subjective but a good way to test for bias is to compare home/away splits. Over 82 games if there is a distinct difference (Like Rondo), you can tell when some players may be getting padded stats.

They used to have a text book definition but Im glad they got more liberal with assist, playmakers were under valued if their pass didn't immediately lead to a shot.
hmm that makes me wonder if magic or stockton would have averaged more assists by todays standard