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Jesse2272
10-05-2012, 06:17 AM
Updated: October 4, 2012, 3:21 PM ET
ESPNChicago.com

Chicago Bulls general manager Gar Forman said Thursday that he's optimistic Derrick Rose will be able to play at some point during the 2012-13 season.

Waddle & Silvy

Bulls GM Gar Forman joined "The Waddle & Silvy Show" and discussed Derrick Rose's return and expectations for the season.

More Podcasts »
Rose, who turned 24 on Thursday, underwent surgery on his left ACL on May 12, and the prognosis for his return was between eight and 12 months.

"He's doing great, and he's right on schedule," Forman said on "The Waddle & Silvy Show" on ESPN 1000. "He's attacked this rehab and has been very focused, and we're really pleased with where he is right now.

"But it's a process and it's a long process. It's still too early to pinpoint an exact time when he'll be back, but everything as of right now is right on schedule, and he's doing terrific. And when he's ready to step on the floor when he's at 100 percent he'll be back on the floor, and we're optimistic he'll be back at some point this year."

Bulls chairman Jerry Reinsdorf told ESPN 1000 during the summer that he won't allow Rose to return until he's 100 percent. Reinsdorf said he doesn't want to make the same mistake he made with Michael Jordan during his second season, when Jordan returned from a foot injury. Jordan didn't aggravate the injury, but Reinsdorf felt it was a risk he doesn't want to take with Rose.

"Until the doctors say he's 100 percent and they put their reputations on the line, he's not coming back," Reinsdorf said in August.

Rose said during media day interviews on Monday that he's about two weeks away from trying to cut on his rebuilt left knee, which he tore during Game 1 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals against the Philadelphia 76ers.

"Probably when I start cutting again (I'll feel I'm back), because right now cutting is the hardest thing in the world right now to do," Rose said Monday. "I'm scared of it. And right when I think I get that out of my system I think I'll be pretty close, where I have to prove to them that I'm ready to play. Hopefully it (doesn't) take the whole year."

Forman said it will be a team decision to determine when Rose is ready.

"We'll be cautious in general," Forman said. "Obviously, myself and Jerry and (vice president of basketball operations John Paxson) and (coach Tom Thibodeau) and the doctors and trainers will all keep tabs on it and have constant communication. We'll come to a consensus as far as when it's best to get him back on the floor. It really won't be until we feel very comfortable that he's ready to be back on the floor competing."

...

Jesse2272
10-05-2012, 06:18 AM
http://youtu.be/GOtxJrzp6ls

JNoel
10-05-2012, 06:21 AM
I've said it all along, I don't see him coming back this season.

Bulls_fan90
10-05-2012, 07:10 AM
Baiting starts in 3...2...1...

xcrisisx
10-05-2012, 07:50 AM
as long as he becomes his old self after the rehab it's fine for me. to many players never get back after that type of injurie. let's hope it doesn't happen to a young marquee player like rose

xcrisisx
10-05-2012, 07:51 AM
as long as he becomes his old self after the rehab it's fine for me. to many players never get back after that type of injurie. let's hope it doesn't happen to a young marquee player like rose

theheatles
10-05-2012, 09:59 AM
He should just sit out the season but Adidas wants to be greedy

Jesse2272
10-05-2012, 10:08 AM
Baiting starts in 3...2...1...

Why

Missing56&33
10-05-2012, 11:27 AM
The reason he's out right now is because they rushed him back to early in the regular season last year. Let him sit this season out and come back stronger than ever 13'-14'.

I'm a fan of Derrick Rose I want to see him at his best...it was sad to see the man in pain all the time.

Pierzynski4Prez
10-05-2012, 11:50 AM
Keep him out until the playoffs. He should be 100% ready to go by mid April. I'm sure the bulls will squeeze in somewhere from the 6-8 seed, maybe they can bring him back and upset a team like the Celtics or Pacers in the 1st round.

MintBerryCrunch
10-05-2012, 11:57 AM
If the team isn't in playoff contention by the time he's " ready " there's no point in bringing him back this season

Jesse2272
10-05-2012, 12:13 PM
Will he be the same DRose when he comes back

KB-Pau-DH2012
10-05-2012, 12:13 PM
Baiting starts in 3...2...1...

It's actually these type of posts that initiate the baiting. Good job. :clap:



Anyways, all I know is that I can't wait for D.Rose to come back 100% healthy. :drool:

Cubby
10-05-2012, 12:45 PM
Waiting until after he's ready to play is counterproductive. I've said it time and time again. You need to build up strength in the surrounding muscles. Sitting out and wasting reps does NOTHING beneficial to Derrick, so all you "doctors" up there should really stop acting like you know everything. Of ****ing course Gar is going to say that. He won't be making any guarantees. He will come back this season, and he will come back stronger. He's already over a month ahead of schedule anyway.

monzternipz12
10-05-2012, 01:07 PM
Waiting until after he's ready to play is counterproductive. I've said it time and time again. You need to build up strength in the surrounding muscles. Sitting out and wasting reps does NOTHING beneficial to Derrick, so all you "doctors" up there should really stop acting like you know everything. Of ****ing course Gar is going to say that. He won't be making any guarantees. He will come back this season, and he will come back stronger. He's already over a month ahead of schedule anyway.

are you a doctor?? or at least in the healthcare profession? (serious question)

JordansBulls
10-05-2012, 10:07 PM
Just hope we can get a 4 seed this season.

ichitownclowni
10-05-2012, 10:14 PM
Will he be the same DRose when he comes back

If they let him rehab and get his knee to full strength yes. Look at Jamaal Charles and Adrian Peterson. Peterson was rushed back and is still doing pretty damn good. Derrick also plays a sport where know one is trying to tackle you.

Jesse2272
10-06-2012, 10:15 AM
If they let him rehab and get his knee to full strength yes. Look at Jamaal Charles and Adrian Peterson. Peterson was rushed back and is still doing pretty damn good. Derrick also plays a sport where know one is trying to tackle you.

I hope so...


Why Derrick Rose’s ACL tear isn’t the end of the world
Posted by Mark Deeks under 2012 NBA Playoffs, Chicago Bulls on May 03, 2012

Time was when a torn anterior cruciate ligament meant your career was over. At best, it was far different. As Bernard King can attest to, torn ACL’s weren’t understood, well treated, or even properly diagnosed. Bad knees were bad knees. Your knee didn’t stop hurting, you got taken out back and shot. That was the last time you ever used the knee.

However, the 21st century, with its flying robot cars and jetpacks for all, is a very different place. Advances in medical science, and a more important concurrent awareness of these advances, have led to enlightened times. Now, a player can tear an ACL and still play.
There is no greater testament to this than the fact that, as best as I can ascertain, 18 players currently in the NBA have previously had torn ACL’s surgically repaired.

That number does not include Ricky Rubio and Eric Maynor, promising young guards who tore ACL’s earlier this season. It does not include Derrick Rose and Iman Shumpert, who tore their ACL’s earlier this week. It also does not include the dozens of others in the recent history of American professional basketball to have had the surgery — of which a non-exhaustive list can be found here — nor does it include the hundreds of NFL players, other sportsmen, or those of us in every day life. Now that we’ve learned (and been bothered) to diagnose it properly, it turns out the injury is rather common.
You can play again after tearing your ACL. In fact, you can even play without having any at all.

The more pertinent question is to what standard you can play. The proliferation of torn ACL’s does not make the injury any less severe. No two ACL tears are the same, nor are any two victims, if that’s the right word. You can’t compare Adam Morrison’s athleticism after his ACL tear to Derrick Rose’s before his, not unless you were playing the Opposites Game. (And if you were, you’d win.) To find a median, then, we ought perhaps look at the aforementioned 18 and try to establish some precedent.

Some players come back just as good they were before the tear. Even though he also tore his MCL and meniscus at the same time, Nene retained his agility after his 2005 triple tear, and became a better player than he ever was before. The same could be said of Shaun Livingston, although we’ll never know quite what he could have been. Similarly, Al Harrington tore his ACL in 2002 in the middle of his break out campaign, came back, and then broke out again anyway. Jared Jeffries actually got better after his rookie season injury, before becoming what he is today. And after tearing his ACL in a 2005 preseason pickup game, Willie Green has demonstrated in the seven years hence that he is as staggeringly mediocre as ever.

On the flip side, look at what has become of Michael Redd, Leon Powe and Nenad Krstic. Powe and Redd’s injuries led to further re-injuries, whilst Krstic’s days as one of the league’s best young centers were emphatically ended by his. And while Josh Howard’s decline could be attributed to both a lengthier injury history, age and chronic tendinitis, the post-ACL tear Howard is half of what he was.

Some of the more recent ACL success stories are big men. Currently playing 29 mpg in the playoffs, David West just played a full 66-game season after tearing his ACL as recently as last March, and still has as much athleticism as before (that is to say, not a lot). To tear an ACL and miss only 11 games, lockout assisted or not, is a testament to the improved prognosis you get these days. Similarly, Al Jefferson is just as grounded and productive as he was before his tear three years ago, Jason Smith lost none of his fluid athleticism, and while he can only receive an “incomplete” grade at this stage, after missing all of last season, Jeff Pendergraph is nonetheless back.
The most comparable players to Rose (and, to a slightly lesser extent, Shumpert) are, of course, athletic guards. It’s great that Pat Garrity came back and was still able to dunk on Sam Dalembert, but it doesn’t really allude to what may happen to Rose, whose athleticism is more important than his skills.

Inevitably, there are fewer comparisons for this. There just aren’t that many guards with elite athleticism — after all, if there were, it wouldn’t be elite. Even athletic players such as Brandon Rush, Jamal Crawford (who maintains that his knee was actually better after the tear) or Corey Brewer — who can still do this after his ACL tear, yet doesn’t jump off his bad knee anyway — don’t use their athleticism in the same manner. Nor does someone like Tony Allen, a powerful athletic guard with a build akin to Rose, but without the other-worldly ability to change direction. Almost incomparably athletic players are almost incomparable.

There do, however, exist a few similar circumstances. Two favorable, one not.
First, the not. Tim Hardaway tore his ACL at the end of his fourth season, and missed the whole 1993-94 campaign as a result. When he returned, he still put up 95 percent of his previous statistical output, but without the same level of explosiveness. The three-point attempts spiked, the athleticism waned, and, while still very good, Hardaway noticeably lost a bit.

This all happened two decades ago, and matters have advanced since then, but with so few comparisons available, Hardaway’s lost explosiveness is noteworthy.

Conversely, two exceptionally athletic guards — Baron Davis and Kyle Lowry — tore their ACL’s in their college years, and yet you wouldn’t know it. Until Rose and Russell Westbrook came along, Davis was the template for the perfect point guard physical specimen, and if Lowry trails them in that department, it’s not by much. In no apparent way did their injuries affect their athletic abilities or career projection — Davis reached All-Star status, while Lowry continues to climb. Whatever they lack as players, the ACL tears are not to blame.

There is no way of knowing what will happen to Rose, Shumpert, Rubio and Maynor. So, given that we don’t know, we have to imagine what will happen. We can be safe in the knowledge that, in multiple recent cases, the player lost nothing at all. More often than not, in fact.
With this in mind, why foresee anything less than a perfect prognosis?

Aleksandar
10-06-2012, 10:20 AM
Dunno when he gets back, but I wish him to be 100% next year.

It will make the league more interesting, I think he's good enough to really lead a team to a championship.

Jesse2272
10-06-2012, 10:24 AM
More recent


Tim Hardaway Thinks Derrick Rose Should Sit Out the Entire Season


Tim Hardaway has been down the same path that Derrick Rose is walking, knee injury-wise. And the former NBA point guard would advise Rose to miss the whole year, in order to fully recover from knee surgery. Per ESPN:

“Chicago native and former NBA All-Star Tim Hardaway keeps hearing a potential March return for Derrick Rose, whose recovery from left ACL surgery reminds Hardaway of his own journey back from that injury, and that personal experience is why his target date for the Bulls point guard is farther off than most. Hardaway thinks Rose should sit out the entire 2012-13 season.

‘I’d just rather have him take his time, so he can be 100 percent, because he’s like me, running and jumping,’ Hardaway said. Hardaway pointed out that his injury was similar to Rose’s, a freak, non-contact injury on a routine play.

Hardaway was going up for a layup on March 3, 1993 against the Los Angeles Lakers when he tore his left ACL, and he missed the entire next season. Rose jump-stopped to shoot his trademark floater in the fourth quarter of Game 1 in the first round of last season’s playoffs against the Philadelphia 76ers.

Hardaway remembers the months after the incident, thinking over and over again, ‘Am I going to come back the way I want to come back?’ But he overcame any doubt and stayed the course, relying on faith, confidence, his family and new eating habits, and he was able to return in 1994-95 and didn’t have to deal with the ACL again — even after his career.

Hardaway said one thing is certain about Rose’s recovery: It will make him a better shooter. ‘His jumpshot is going to come back a lot better than what it was,’ said Hardaway, who is now a community liaison and scout for the Miami Heat. ‘I’ll tell you that.

His jumpers and his free throw percentage is going to be up. I’m telling you. That’s all you can do. You can’t do anything else, but shoot around and just shoot free throws.’”