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View Full Version : September 11th Dedication in Sports Thread



AndyfromNeptune
09-11-2012, 01:00 AM
Since it's September 11th, I figured I would make a thread to commemorate memories from the atrocity whether it be personal or in relation to sports.


For example, I will never forget how so many people in New York City came together following 9/11 in Shea Stadium and Yankee Stadium.

For all those who were affected including myself by 9/11, we will never forget.

sexicano31
09-11-2012, 01:04 AM
I got pulled out of school, which was pretty rad

metswon69
09-11-2012, 01:27 AM
I was living in Williamsburg (Brooklyn) and my girlfriend at the time and I could see the North Tower up in flames.

Everyone thought it was an accident (at least from original rumor and reports much like the plane that hit the Empire State Building in the 1930s) but at 9:03 we saw the 2nd plane hit the South Tower.

We knew then what it was and within that hour and a half, both towers would have collapsed and nearly 3000 people would be dead.

The scariest part was my dad was a supervisor for Effective Security which patrolled the North Tower on the 16th floor. I was calling him and calling him only to get a busy signal for over 2 hours. I am going crazy wondering if he got out and crying wondering what life without my dad would be like.

I then get a phone call from a number i don't recognize at 11:07 AM. It's my dad and he's at a pay phone uptown telling me he was alright and that everyone on his floor got out safely.

I never was so relieved and yet so sad in my whole life.

DaBear
09-11-2012, 01:33 AM
I was in 6th grade at the time. My teacher was recapping the events that took place, and told us not to worry since we were all the way on the west coast.

Jeffy25
09-11-2012, 01:46 AM
Senior in High School, watched it all day on tv. Incredibly sad.

Rush
09-11-2012, 01:51 AM
I remember watching it everything happen, even the building coming down, at my grandma's house in the morning about 645-7am since I'm in San Francisco. I was in the fifth grade and went to school that day and they let us out about an hour or so later. Of course we were all happy we were getting out early and why, but really had no idea of the impact. Of course now I understand and can't imagine how it was in New York that morning.

JOhnnyTHaJet
09-11-2012, 02:08 AM
I was in 4th grade, got taken out of school by my dad. My mother worked in the city but she was thankfully not near the towers and got out safely. I had no idea what was going on, all I knew was a plane hit a building in NYC.

Watched the Mets game (although not a Mets fan) a few days later and I remember my Dad telling me never to forget this game. I didnt realize the magnitude of it all then but looking back now it was truly one of the more powerful moments in sports history.

SuperiorState
09-11-2012, 02:21 AM
Senior year in high school. We were in "Current Affairs" class. Part of the class was watching the morning news and I remember seeing it live on TV. I remember the first tower smoking and then watching the second plane hit.

Being a Senior in HS and having the start of your life ahead of you it was really quite shocking. Rumors of War (then war). Rumors of a Draft. Turmoil everywhere, protests. It was as close as my generation could ever get to Vietnam (Side Note: Vietnam Era was much, much, much worse but it was the closest thing I could think of). I remember alot of my classmates sign up for the Marines and Army before the attack just so they could get their school paid for. But in one instant everything changed and they were shipped out for training the day after graduation and then straight to Afghanistan.

It definitely was a loss of innocence for alot of my peers and myself that day.

My only regret is that I didn't enlist and serve my country. Something that still shames me and brings me to tears at times.

Every chance I get, though, I thank veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars regardless of my political views on it.

They are (and were) much braver and nobler than I will ever be.

SuperiorState
09-11-2012, 02:43 AM
I was living in Williamsburg (Brooklyn) and my girlfriend at the time and I could see the North Tower up in flames.

Everyone thought it was an accident (at least from original rumor and reports much like the plane that hit the Empire State Building in the 1930s) but at 9:03 we saw the 2nd plane hit the South Tower.

We knew then what it was and within that hour and a half, both towers would have collapsed and nearly 3000 people would be dead.

The scariest part was my dad was a supervisor for Effective Security which patrolled the North Tower on the 16th floor. I was calling him and calling him only to get a busy signal for over 2 hours. I am going crazy wondering if he got out and crying wondering what life without my dad would be like.

I then get a phone call from a number i don't recognize at 11:07 AM. It's my dad and he's at a pay phone uptown telling me he was alright and that everyone on his floor got out safely.

I never was so relieved and yet so sad in my whole life.

Thank you for sharing your story. It really puts things in better perspective for those of us who were fortunate enough to not have family involved or to be there ourselves.

LASportsFan1996
09-11-2012, 03:08 AM
Was watching in the morning before school & once at school we even watched the events unfold, although I was very young, at the time, we didn't really know the magnitude of the situation...

SportsAndrew25
09-11-2012, 03:08 AM
I was eight years old at that time and I was going to be nine by the end of October. The night before this all happened, I came home from school and I watch Nickelodeon's Rocket Power, one my favorite cartoon shows. The show was coming out with a new season and the first episode o the new season featured skateboarder Tony Hawk. I was a fourth grader in science class at the former Children's Colony Prep School on that day. My science teacher (Mr. Cordice) was in front of the classroom giving the class lesson for that day when a teacher in an adjacent classroom came to Mr. Cordice and told him what happened. The adjacent classroom, if I recall correctly, also had a TV, so the class next door saw the whole thing. At around 10 AM, Mr. Cordice broke out of his lesson to tell us that the World Trade Center was under the attack of airplanes and that one of the towers had collapsed. Since this was before our 10:15 snack break, he was obviously referring to the South Tower. 10:15 AM came and we had our 15 minute snack break and we were all wondering what happened in Manhattan. Right before the snack break ended, as I would later find out, the North Tower collapsed. We then went on with the day's classes and we had no idea was going on. The school day did end as it normally would, right around 4:00 PM. My mom, a nurse, almost instantly picked me up from school and took me four blocks to our house. As we were just about to walk into our house, I asked mom what had happened. She then proceeded to tell me the shocking story of what had happened. I then went into my bedroom and quickly put on the television, not to watch my favorite cartoons, but to watch the aftermath of the attacks. I found out that 7 World Trade Center came down. The lasting image of that day came at around 5:30 or 6:00 PM, when I put on the living room television and had on Channel 7. What I saw was a hole with nothing but smoke coming from it. That hole used be two of the most famous landmarks on the planet, the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center. The month before, I saw the Twin Towers from the Statue of Liberty when me and my dad visited the Statue. We walked around the pedestal and looked at the Manhattan skyline. It was a beautiful Friday Afternoon in early August 2001 and the sun reflected off the Twin Towers. Dad promised that he would eventually take me there one day (he went there when he emigrated to this country 22 years ago). Not even the wildest of my imaginations made me see what would happen one month later. After seeing the wreckage of the Twin Towers, I eventually got tired and went to sleep, and I missed President Bush's address to the nation. I woke up the next morning and I had to go to school that day, in part because our principal did not want us to stay home and watch the 9/11 coverage all day. When I went to class, normally talkative and jovial people were reduced to silence, not even during lunch or playtime in the schoolyard. That was perhaps the most surreal time period in my lifetime. I will never forget that time period as long as I live.

Guppyfighter
09-11-2012, 09:22 PM
http://timelines.ws/subjects/Disasters.HTML

Enjoy.

AndyfromNeptune
09-11-2012, 09:40 PM
The Yankees and Mets games that followed 9/11/01 were probably some of the most important games in sports history.

AndyfromNeptune
09-11-2012, 09:41 PM
I sometimes forget that a lot of people on the West Coast were almost unaware of the pain that swept through the New York and New York Metropolitan area.

Down here in Carolina right now for college, it's almost like the day didn't exist.

AndyfromNeptune
09-11-2012, 09:41 PM
This is the status I posted on Facebook:

This year, the 11th anniversary of 9/11/01 seemed to get much less media coverage than in the past years. Down here in North Carolina, I didn't even see a sign that one of the worst tragedies in our nation's history ever even occurred. And
at first I thought that it was a good thing. The kids entering elementary school for the first time will never have had to experience my life long paranoia of seeing a low flying plane and wondering if another mass murder would occur. The kids entering high school will have barely remembered the ashes--the death--that traveled over the Hudson River into my town in New Jersey. Osama Bin Laden is dead. The War in Iraq is over. Al Qaeda is about to be defeated.
And yet what comes with the natural recession of coverage of 9/11/01 comes the necessity to keep its memory, in our minds, stronger than ever. We can NEVER forget what it's like to see our neighbors, friends, and family wonder if their loved ones were coming home from the city that night. We can NEVER forget the feeling of vulnerability that resonated following the attacks. We can NEVER forget the pain, the suffering, the agony of knowing that on September 12th, 2001 there were thousands of people who were not able to wake up due to being the victims of murder. Finally, we can NEVER forget the feeling of our communities coming together--comforting, protecting, and love each other--at a point in time in which none of it seemed possible.

9/11/01, it's been 11 years, but your memory is just as strong in my head as when my principal walked into my second grade classroom and told us our parents wouldn't be coming home for a while due to a major traffic jam. I will never forget, and the rest of the world should never forget.

To all those who were directly affected by the events of 9/11/01, you are always in the thoughts and prayers of so many. ♥

Most importantly, "Be Strong and Courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified of them, for the Lord your God goes with you. He will never leave you or forsake you." Deuteronomy 31:6.

9/11/01, we will truly NEVER forget.

Texas Holders
09-11-2012, 09:42 PM
I had just graduated from college earlier in the summer...still hard to believe that my kids weren't born yet when it happened, doesn't feel like that long ago.