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View Full Version : Does an NBA player getting a college degree change your opinion of him??



RLundi
05-26-2012, 12:10 PM
http://aol.sportingnews.com/nba/story/2012-05-15/amare-stoudemire-university-of-miami-jeff-green-georgetown-graduation-playoffs


While season-ending injuries, flopping and punched fire-extinguishers have dominated NBA headlines of late, here’s a story that should enhance your perspective of NBA players: Jeff Green, who sat out this season with a heart condition, and Amare Stoudemire, whose New York Knicks were ousted in the first-round of the playoffs, are spending their off-the-court time in the classroom.

Green, who left Georgetown after his junior year and was drafted by the Seattle SuperSonics, will graduate from the school this weekend.

Jeff Green, most recently of the Boston Celtics, will pick up his degree from Georgetown. (AP photo)
“Just picked up my cap and gown for graduation Saturday...FINALLY DONE!!!..Best feeling in the world,” Green posted on his Twitter account.

Green’s an unrestricted free agent but has said he wants to return to the Boston Celtics next season.

Stoudemire, he of the aforementioned punched fire-extinguisher, has registered for summer classes at the University of Miami, where he’ll work toward a bachelor’s degree in general studies, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

“Just enrolled at the University of Miami. Working on continuing my education,” Stoudemire said in tweet that included a photo of himself giving the “U” sign.


A few players have gone back to college to get their degrees (Vince Carter, Shaq to name some). Does it make you think of them differently? Better, somehow?

DR_1
05-26-2012, 12:13 PM
As a person, yes. As a player, no.

Hawkeye15
05-26-2012, 12:15 PM
absolutely nothing for me.

JWO35
05-26-2012, 12:24 PM
No, I view them as athletes not role models or anything like that....

kdspurman
05-26-2012, 12:33 PM
I think in some cases you can tell those who went and those who didn't not only as a player but as a person just when you hear how they think and the way they speak.

I don't think differently about them, just every now and then to myself thinking that dude should've done a year or 2 in college, but that's about it.

aimeeuuvr
05-26-2012, 12:46 PM
http://www.vvio.info/jpg1I think in some cases you can tell those who went and those who didn't not only as a player but as a person just when you hear how they think and the way they speak.

I don't think differently about them, just every now and then to myself thinking that dude should've done a year or 2 in college, but that's about it.

you hear how they think and the way they speak.

torocan
05-26-2012, 12:46 PM
I think going back to school is good for them as individuals, good for their development as team mates, and potentially good for their development as players.

Education is a good thing. Learning to think critically is useful in all avenues of life, especially if that leads to deeper self-examination.

Learning something new is a good reminder to any player that hard work and self-improvement applies to everything, including basketball no matter how gifted you are.

greg_ory_2005
05-26-2012, 01:17 PM
Nope. All I care about is if they're good or not.

-Kobe24-TJ19-
05-26-2012, 01:30 PM
I read how Shaq got those degrees:laugh2:

ManRam
05-26-2012, 01:34 PM
Not one bit.

Not even as a person, because the reason they're leaving college is for their own betterment. If they go back and get it later, then that's awesome...but I don't lose an ounce of respect for anyone who leaves to go to the NBA. I don't think any differently of them.

Mosesmoreno#1
05-26-2012, 03:07 PM
Maybe if they got their degree in economics, most of them won't go broke a year after they retire.

Lakeshow24KB
05-26-2012, 03:36 PM
Maybe if they got their degree in economics, most of them won't go broke a year after they retire.

:laugh:

Gram
05-26-2012, 03:43 PM
No. Some a the people here could use a college degree though.

Big Zo
05-26-2012, 03:46 PM
No, because I don't give a crap to begin with.

Raps18-19 Champ
05-26-2012, 04:35 PM
Eh.

chicago lulz
05-26-2012, 04:56 PM
I just find it funny when someone is trying to promote education as being important, when they themselves don't care enough to pursue higher education.

Cfrey
05-26-2012, 05:02 PM
Not really but I do give players credit for trying to finish up and get a degree because I for sure know there is no way I would ever do that if I was making millions of dollars a year lol.. I would see no point in it.

Wade>You
05-26-2012, 05:03 PM
Getting an education should be an accomplishment only you pride yourself in, not something that you have to prove to society that only think pro athletes are idiots.

Not only that, these guys make more money than any of us will ever amount in our life. Respect.

JasonJohnHorn
05-26-2012, 05:06 PM
I generally have more respect for a player who gets a degree. Athletes, for better or for worse, are role models, so the ones who take the time to put education first and lead by example are the type of players that I respect more, and that mentality usually shows through in their on-court performance. Look a guys like Battier and Duncan, guys who finished all four years. Talentwise they are worlds apart, one is a franchise player, the other a role-player, but they are both professional on the court. There are excpetions, I'm sure (though I can't think of any right now), but others share this point of view. Larry Bird made a point of drafting players who played all-four years and it seems to have paid off for the Pacers.

Wolfman01
05-26-2012, 05:10 PM
Yes a NBA player getting a college degree tells the fans that their IQ in basketball and college is very high. Good players have high basketball IQ and are able to react faster then most when it comes to playing basketball.

thekmp211
05-26-2012, 05:25 PM
no? plenty of shitheads graduate college on time and early, as well. by itself it's beyond meaningless to basketball.

KB-Pau-DH2012
05-26-2012, 05:50 PM
As a person, yes. As a player, no.

This makes no sense. I know medical doctors who have the douchiest attitude and don't give a **** about the patients, but rather their paycheck.

Doesn't matter how much mankind achieves, if he or she is not a good person to begin with from childhood growing up to teen and then to adulthood, and then eventually elderly stage, no matter how much money or prestige they receive, a ****** person is a ****** person at the end of the day.

Gram
05-26-2012, 05:52 PM
This makes no sense. I know medical doctors who have the douchiest attitude and don't give a **** about the patients, but rather their paycheck.

Doesn't matter how much mankind achieves, if he or she is not a good person to begin with from childhood growing up to teen and then to adulthood, and then eventually elderly stage, no matter how much money or prestige they receive, a ****** person is a ****** person at the end of the day.

You mad?

topdog
05-26-2012, 06:15 PM
If they do it while they are a player and get a legitimate degree i.e. legitimate university (not NAU) and not "general studies."

After their career is over, it doesn't really mean anything to me, nor change the way they might have interacted in interviews such as speaking semi-proper English.

bholly
05-26-2012, 06:31 PM
Doesn't affect my view on them as players, which is 99% of what I care about, and I don't think it gives any indication of their intelligence or basketball IQ as someone suggested - I've spent a decent amount of time in/around higher education and you can go pretty far with well below average intelligence.

But it is an indication that the guy values education - something that I also value pretty highly - and working towards goals other than basketball, so I see it as a plus in my view of them as people. Maybe no more a plus than if they dedicated themselves to something else worthwhile, but I just mean relative to the guys who do nothing but blow through their money being adult children.

In some cases (eg Shaq's Ed.D) it just makes me roll my eyes and judge the school. I literally went to their website to read about the programme in Shaq's case, because I'm so sure he's a moron I had to figure out whether it was just super easy or something.

Corey
05-26-2012, 06:34 PM
I think it shows good character and work ethic, personally. They know that their basketball career isn't going to be there forever, and they want to have a degree and a full education to fall back on.

Cubs Win
05-26-2012, 07:03 PM
I think it shows good character and work ethic, personally. They know that their basketball career isn't going to be there forever, and they want to have a degree and a full education to fall back on.

Agreed. It doesn't make my think more/less of them as a basketball player but it's nice to see that work ethic out of a person already making millions playing a sport. Maybe they could retire with $20 mil, but to retire with $20 mil and a college degree is even more impressive IMO.

kingkenny01
05-26-2012, 07:23 PM
It shows character, it is very respectable, i don't think their as immature then and it shows they have some good values like education

DreamShaker
05-26-2012, 09:09 PM
It is honestly hard for me to think badly of someone I have never met and feel justified. I do respect the work it takes to finish a goal, but it does not make me think less or more of them in any way. That being said, I do think it is a wise move to have something to fall bacj on.