PDA

View Full Version : Young, unskilled drafts are watering down the NBA



GunFactor187
04-10-2012, 02:44 PM
Published: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 12:16 PM EDT

There is an easy assessment of the National Basketball Association when it comes to its talent level: It’s weak and possibly becoming weaker.

Any fan who watches an NBA game lately will see athletes who are professional by name, but their gameplay will say otherwise.

Professional basketball games are filled with bad shooting and a disturbing lack of fundamental playing skills. Offenses are basic, as a player dribbles at the top of the key, then that player dribbles toward the lane for a shot or settles for a 3-pointer. Gone are the days of the passing, pick-and-roll basketball where offenses played as a unit and players used fundamentals to score.

The NBA has hurt itself during the last 15 years, and the game has digressed to a poor level because it has drafted unproven, young talent, mainly 18 to 19-year-old kids who were never ready to play in an NBA game.

Professional basketball used to be played at a level that awed. Now, it is played at a level that leaves fans scratching their heads.

In 2001, the Washington Wizards drafted Kwame Brown. It marked the first time that a high school player was drafted as the first pick in the NBA draft. Brown has never panned out in the league. Before him were first-round picks Rashard Lewis, Al Harrington, Korleone Young, Jonathan Bender and Leon Smith, all of them fresh out of high school. None of them became household names, but all contributed to the recent state of the NBA, because they were watering down the league with their poor play.

It’s true that Kobe Bryant, Kevin Garnett, Dwight Howard and Tracy McGrady all came to the NBA out of high school and have excelled. Bryant and Garnett are hall-of-fame players, and Bryant will go down as one of the best players in history.

For every Bryant and Garnett, however, there is a Tyson Chandler, Ousmane Cisse, DeSagana Diop, Travis Outlaw, Ndudi Ebi, James Lang, Robert Swift and Sebastian Telfair. These players never made it or reached high levels in the NBA. They were guaranteed $3 million-a-year contracts for at least three years, and as a result, played more than they should have, once again lowering the talent level on the court.

In 2006, the NBA instituted its “one-and-done” rule where a player cannot enter the draft until he is at least 19. This has led to many high school players going to college for one year and leaving the school immediately after their freshman seasons for a shot at the NBA.

The University of Kentucky is the king of this rule. In the past three seasons it has lost John Wall, DeMarcus Cousins, Eric Bledsoe, Daniel Orton and Brandon Knight to the NBA after only one year of college. This year’s Wildcats won the NCAA title and are expected to lose Anthony Davis, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist and Marquis Teague to the draft. They are all freshmen.

We are not criticizing the kids. If a person has a shot at making millions of dollars, then let them. It’s the adults involved with the league who are creating the problem. Why would the NBA want to take an unproven player who severely lacks the fundamentals to play the game? It’s better for coaches, such as Syracuse’s Jim Boeheim or Florida’s Billy Donovan, to have these players for at least three years and turn them into great basketball players. Instead, the NBA is full of great athletes, but very few good players.

Prior to the mid-1990s, players usually went to college for at least three years. It was almost unheard of for a player to leave after one or two years of playing at the collegiate level. It did happen occasionally, as Allen Iverson left Georgetown after his sophomore year in 1996, and Ron Mercer left Kentucky after his sophomore season in 1997, among a few others. But then something changed. It became acceptable to draft players based on a probability that they would succeed.

This eventually lowered the average age of the NBA player and lowered the average skill level, too. As a result, young players who were not ready to play in the league were no longer playing against a crop of men who had established their skills at a high collegiate level. They were now beginning to play primarily against other players who were not qualified to be true NBA players.

Teams can no longer score routinely in the 100s as they did up until the 1980s and early 90s. Proponents of today’s NBA game say that’s because defenses have gotten better. No, they haven’t. The NBA does allow teams to play a zone defense, but that doesn’t mean the talent on the court is just as good as it was 15, or even 10, years ago.

Of course, players such as Wall of the Washington Wizards and Cousins of the Sacramento Kings can compete in today’s NBA – simply because they are playing against others who also can’t play at a true NBA level. Most young players today don’t understand the nuances of the game. Yes, they have to compete against future hall-of-fame players such as Ray Allen, Paul Pierce and Tim Duncan, but the league isn’t filled with players like those three any more.

Allen, Paul and Duncan were just as good as Wall and Cousins in their first year of college, but they weren’t ready to play in a league dominated by the likes of Hakeem Olajuwon, Patrick Ewing, Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, John Stockton, Karl Malone, Charles Barkley or Shaquille O’Neal, all of whom went to college for at least three years before entering the league. They stayed in school because they knew, as did the adults around them, that they weren’t ready as freshmen or sophomores to enter the NBA, despite their athletic abilities.

Now, unfortunately, today’s “talents” such as Derek Rose (left Memphis after one season) or Knight can shine in a league whose skills are soft and only getting softer.

• • •

Today’s editorial was written by Sports Editor Al Edwards on behalf of the Journal Tribune Editorial Board. Questions? Comments? Contact Managing Editor Kristen Schulze Muszynski by calling 282-1535, Ext. 322, or via email at kristenm@journaltribune.com.


http://www.journaltribune.com/articles/2012/04/10/editorial/doc4f8442513efdf860255615.txt

DerekRE_3
04-10-2012, 02:55 PM
A big problem is the lack of practice time during the season. You have a lot of 19 year olds coming in with limited skill and experience, and once the season starts there isn't much time for the coaching staff to develop them. A lot of them just end up rotting on the bench.

This is exactly why I'd like to see the NBA have less games during the season but keep the length of the season the same, maybe even a bit longer. Have more days off between games, and more time to practice and develop players. Less games, better product.

A good amount of the surprises of this past draft were 3 or 4 year college players:
Isaiah Thomas: 3 years
Kenneth Faried: 4 years
Marshon Brooks: 4 years
Chandler Parson: 4 years

PurpleJesus
04-10-2012, 02:59 PM
its not really watering down the NBA, its watering down the NCAA.

When March comes, i always think of what we should be watching in the tournament, if staying 3-4 years in school was still the norm for the top players...this year for example, we could have been watching a tournament with

Jon Wall, Derrick Williams, Kyrie Irving, Tyreke Evans, Demar Derozan, Jrue Holliday, Derrick Favors, Demarcus Cousins, Greg Monroe, Paul George, Brandon Knight, Kemba Walker, Klay Thompson, Iman Shumpert, etc...etc...add in all the top players of this years teams as well...and the NCAA tournament, would have been one of the biggest spectacles in sports...like it used to be.

Raph12
04-10-2012, 03:00 PM
And then you have guys like Kyrie Irving...

da ThRONe
04-10-2012, 03:03 PM
A big problem is the lack of practice time during the season. You have a lot of 19 year olds coming in with limited skill and experience, and once the season starts there isn't much time for the coaching staff to develop them. A lot of them just end up rotting on the bench.

This is exactly why I'd like to see the NBA have less games during the season but keep the length of the season the same, maybe even a bit longer. Have more days off between games, and more time to practice and develop players. Less games, better product.

I have been a big fan of reducing the season to 50-56 games for a couple years now, and this was one of my many reason to do so.

IndyRealist
04-10-2012, 03:04 PM
A big problem is the lack of practice time during the season. You have a lot of 19 year olds coming in with limited skill and experience, and once the season starts there isn't much time for the coaching staff to develop them. A lot of them just end up rotting on the bench.

This is exactly why I'd like to see the NBA have less games during the season but keep the length of the season the same, maybe even a bit longer. Have more days off between games, and more time to practice and develop players. Less games, better product.

That's the danger of drafting on upside, which really means a ton of athleticism but no skills. Everyone thinks it's someone else's responsibility to teach them how to play.

Donuts365
04-10-2012, 03:12 PM
im new to the forums how do i steal a sig ?

Ill21
04-10-2012, 03:15 PM
im new to the forums how do i steal a sig ?

100 posts

b@llhog24
04-10-2012, 03:15 PM
im new to the forums how do i steal a sig ?

You need at least a 100 posts 1st.

JayW_1023
04-10-2012, 04:41 PM
A big problem is the lack of practice time during the season. You have a lot of 19 year olds coming in with limited skill and experience, and once the season starts there isn't much time for the coaching staff to develop them. A lot of them just end up rotting on the bench.

This is exactly why I'd like to see the NBA have less games during the season but keep the length of the season the same, maybe even a bit longer. Have more days off between games, and more time to practice and develop players. Less games, better product.

A good amount of the surprises of this past draft were 3 or 4 year college players:
Isaiah Thomas: 3 years
Kenneth Faried: 4 years
Marshon Brooks: 4 years
Chandler Parson: 4 years

Tim Duncan stayed in school too. It's a lesson. The games fundamentals are on the line and it's definitely hurting the overall level of play in the NBA.

It's no surprise older players like Steve Nash, Kobe Bryant, Dirk Nowitzki Paul Pierce, Manu Ginobili still perform well...the younger competition is much slower in development, allowing older players to flourish longer...because they still stick out because they have mastered the fundamentals.

With the 00's generation gone I expect the NBA's level of play to go down really fast unless we inhibit a rule that forces players to stay in school for a minimum of two years before declaring for the draft.

Chronz
04-10-2012, 04:47 PM
Whats a good #? 2 years of schooling? 3?

InRoseWeTrust
04-10-2012, 04:49 PM
Taj Gibson came polished and ready to play.

I would say 3 years minimum is fine, so long as there is an option for the elite talent to forgo college completely and skip to the pro level. Hold a pre-draft combine where kids can get evaluated, and if its clear they are a top 10 pick just let them declare. No need making the LeBrons, D12s, and Roses of the world go to college.

Chronz
04-10-2012, 04:51 PM
Tim Duncan stayed in school too. It's a lesson. The games fundamentals are on the line and it's definitely hurting the overall level of play in the NBA.

It's no surprise older players like Steve Nash, Kobe Bryant, Dirk Nowitzki Paul Pierce, Manu Ginobili still perform well...the younger competition is much slower in development, allowing older players to flourish longer...because they still stick out because they have mastered the fundamentals.

With the 00's generation gone I expect the NBA's level of play to go down really fast unless we inhibit a rule that forces players to stay in school for a minimum of two years before declaring for the draft.
2nd paragraph is an interesting point, I thought it was due to the medical advances but if they are so productive because they just understand the game at a level the kids cant then it would mean once they are gone we are in for some ugly basketball.

Or maybe the opposite will happen, maybe these kids playing alongside players like that will hasten their NBA learning curve.

Or maybe its all irrelevant and basketball ability is dependent on the individuals thirst for greatness, doesnt matter where hes at

Chronz
04-10-2012, 04:58 PM
Taj Gibson came polished and ready to play.

I would say 3 years minimum is fine, so long as there is an option for the elite talent to forgo college completely and skip to the pro level. Hold a pre-draft combine where kids can get evaluated, and if its clear they are a top 10 pick just let them declare. No need making the LeBrons, D12s, and Roses of the world go to college.

Prospects do get an idea of where they will be drafted but that still leaves the Telfairs, Ndudi Ebi, Miles, etc. Even great drafting teams will take on a HS gamble with a late 1st rounder (See Spurs and the notorious Leon Smith)


What about guys like Curry/Bynum? Would you have sent them to school? Would it have made a difference. Maybe going to school forces these kids to mature alil but in the case of Bynum, I dont think you can find a better teacher than Kareem/Phil and co.

I would like to see a 2 year rule just for experimental purposes but I doubt it makes a difference. Busts come in all shapes and sizes, and focusing on HS players is an easy out.

One thing that would be really awesome, is forebidding HS players from earning first round checks. All undergrads have to be taken in the 2nd round. It lowers the risk level, raises the value of 2nd round picks, and gives the kids incentive to either stay in school or only come out if they think they believe they can recoup the lost lottery money with an earlier FA bid.

5ass
04-10-2012, 05:02 PM
im new to the forums how do i steal a sig ?

First you must sacrifice a cat.

JayW_1023
04-10-2012, 05:06 PM
2nd paragraph is an interesting point, I thought it was due to the medical advances but if they are so productive because they just understand the game at a level the kids cant then it would mean once they are gone we are in for some ugly basketball.


My fears exactly. More players like JaVale McGee will make the NBA a joke (not that 'Vale might be a bust, far from it)

Iodine
04-10-2012, 05:07 PM
Clearly going to school made all the difference for Anthony Randolph and Brandon Wright.

There should be an actual NBA Developmental system, I like the DLeague but its not close to enough. I would rather a system help the kids that want to play basketball become more likely to reach their potential by being in a place that does away with all the ******** and just acknowledges your there to play basketball and become as good as you can.

The NCAA is a broken system and a joke, and has been for a while.

DerekRE_3
04-10-2012, 05:08 PM
Whats a good #? 2 years of schooling? 3?

I want this:
You can come out of high school, but if you go to college (or take the Brandon Jennings route), you have to be three years removed from high school to enter the draft.

da ThRONe
04-10-2012, 05:10 PM
Tim Duncan stayed in school too. It's a lesson. The games fundamentals are on the line and it's definitely hurting the overall level of play in the NBA.

It's no surprise older players like Steve Nash, Kobe Bryant, Dirk Nowitzki Paul Pierce, Manu Ginobili still perform well...the younger competition is much slower in development, allowing older players to flourish longer...because they still stick out because they have mastered the fundamentals.

With the 00's generation gone I expect the NBA's level of play to go down really fast unless we inhibit a rule that forces players to stay in school for a minimum of two years before declaring for the draft.

Where does this idea that fundamentals and college go hand and hand. Every player in the NBA has more time and resources to develop any part of their games than collegiate athletes.

Of the names you mentioned only Nash and Pierce played college ball.

Iodine
04-10-2012, 05:11 PM
I want this:
You can come out of high school, but if you go to college (or take the Brandon Jennings route), you have to be three years removed from high school to enter the draft.

The baseball formula (it would obvs need some tweaking) like this IMO is the best considering theres no way what I really want would happen.

AddiX
04-10-2012, 05:15 PM
I completely agree with the article, on top of that the 1 year players just don't learn a thing and get by in college on pure talent.

When iwatch players like wall and Evans it's completely clear they weren't taught a thing in Kentucky. They got by on talent which was fine for college, but now there expected to run systems, set plays, and be leaders, and its not happening.

There are far to many blowouts in the NBA, and your a crappy team, what do you do? Dump your good vets for a bunch of under developed young guys. It's god awful to watch.

SteveNash
04-10-2012, 05:19 PM
I don't know how a bad coach whose offense revolves around passing the ball around the perimeter before someone decides to take a bad shot will be much help to future NBA players.


A good amount of the surprises of this past draft were 3 or 4 year college players:
Isaiah Thomas: 3 years
Kenneth Faried: 4 years
Marshon Brooks: 4 years
Chandler Parson: 4 years

Not really a surprise, those players are just viewed as having limited upside.

Iodine
04-10-2012, 05:24 PM
Still trying to see how this is worse than the years right after the merger, or when coaches got massive ego's and slowed down the game to terrifyingly slow paces in the late 90's/early 00's, or when the league had a massive cocaine problem. Oh but the nostalgia makes this era so much worse compared to the past.

JayW_1023
04-10-2012, 05:25 PM
Where does this idea that fundamentals and college go hand and hand. Every player in the NBA has more time and resources to develop any part of their games than collegiate athletes.

Of the names you mentioned only Nash and Pierce played college ball.

You're missing the point. It had nothing to do with them playing college, but remaining as dominant players at their age because the gap in fundamentals between older and younger players is becoming wider and wider.

KnickFanSince91
04-10-2012, 05:37 PM
David Aldridge basically destroys this theory here

http://www.nba.com/2012/news/features/david_aldridge/04/09/morning-tip-nba-draft-age-limit-debate/index.html

It's not the kids or the fact that too many of them are coming out early, it's just the game is evolving and purists are being dragged along kicking and screaming. They want to see pick and rolls and princeton offenses but today's game is fast-break 3's and dunking on cats violently.

If they want to blame somebody for the change in the way the game is played, blame the people who changed the rules and made it virtually impossible to guard athletic guys one-on-one.

Iodine
04-10-2012, 05:40 PM
David Aldridge basically destroys this theory here

http://www.nba.com/2012/news/features/david_aldridge/04/09/morning-tip-nba-draft-age-limit-debate/index.html

It's not the kids or the fact that too many of them are coming out early, it's just the game is evolving and purists are being dragged along kicking and screaming. They want to see pick and rolls and princeton offenses but today's game is fast-break 3's and dunking on cats violently.

If they want to blame somebody for the change in the way the game is played, blame the people who changed the rules and made it virtually impossible to guard athletic guys one-on-one.
David Aldridge makes me hard

Celticsfan2007
04-10-2012, 05:43 PM
I think the NBA is close on this subject. 2 years minimum in college, for even players like LeBron, Kobe, etc would have been nice.

AddiX
04-10-2012, 05:43 PM
David Aldridge basically destroys this theory here

http://www.nba.com/2012/news/features/david_aldridge/04/09/morning-tip-nba-draft-age-limit-debate/index.html

It's not the kids or the fact that too many of them are coming out early, it's just the game is evolving and purists are being dragged along kicking and screaming. They want to see pick and rolls and princeton offenses but today's game is fast-break 3's and dunking on cats violently.

If they want to blame somebody for the change in the way the game is played, blame the people who changed the rules and made it virtually impossible to guard athletic guys one-on-one.

You clearly completely missed the point of the article.

Purists? Are you kidding me? These young guys can't play! It's that simple, these guys don't know how to do very basic fundamentals. And when it comes to running a system or executing actual plays there completely lost.

SteveNash
04-10-2012, 05:57 PM
You clearly completely missed the point of the article.

Purists? Are you kidding me? These young guys can't play! It's that simple, these guys don't know how to do very basic fundamentals. And when it comes to running a system or executing actual plays there completely lost.

I'll take players that "can't play" over Jimmer Fredette.

Cal827
04-10-2012, 05:59 PM
I would like to see them last in college for at least 2 years but I'm not too pissed with the rules now. This is a business after-all. You need to make wise decisions in order to maintain your status.. so if GMs want to go draft players from high school, thinking they have someone like Kobe over Kwame.. then it's their risk.

KnickFanSince91
04-10-2012, 06:00 PM
You clearly completely missed the point of the article.

Purists? Are you kidding me? These young guys can't play! It's that simple, these guys don't know how to do very basic fundamentals. And when it comes to running a system or executing actual plays there completely lost.

I don't see how that's not a coaching problem. If the kid don't know the fundamentals, teach them. If you don't want to teach them, bench them until they put in the time to learn.

flea
04-10-2012, 06:07 PM
David Aldridge basically destroys this theory here

http://www.nba.com/2012/news/features/david_aldridge/04/09/morning-tip-nba-draft-age-limit-debate/index.html

It's not the kids or the fact that too many of them are coming out early, it's just the game is evolving and purists are being dragged along kicking and screaming. They want to see pick and rolls and princeton offenses but today's game is fast-break 3's and dunking on cats violently.

If they want to blame somebody for the change in the way the game is played, blame the people who changed the rules and made it virtually impossible to guard athletic guys one-on-one.
I agree that the rules are primarily the reason the NBA is so stupid now. It's a giant marketing campaign to sell sneakers, jerseys, and crappy journalism that looks more like TMZ articles than anything else. But I also think that, as a result of the rules changes, it has made otherwise inferior basketball players thrive. Forcing kids to stay in school would be a band-aid solution. If they really want to fix the fact that the NBA is so boring competitively they'll re-institute the rules that don't allow absurd athletes with mediocre skills to score 20-25 a game as long as they drive and draw contact.

thekmp211
04-10-2012, 06:07 PM
again, i defy anyone here to name me one player who DID/DIDNT become great as a direct result of going to college, or not. there is not one ounce of evidence that the relationship is causal. correlation? maybe. but there is no evidence of this and the weak generalizations are starting to get lame. this article is lame.


Professional basketball used to be played at a level that awed. Now, it is played at a level that leaves fans scratching their heads.

really? we all go out of your way to post in an nba forum and this is how we feel? gimmie a break. it's self-serving bull. show me the proof. the league is still trending up, it has been for years, lets stop saying it isn't and blaming it on the talent pool that isn't changing based on school requirements.

Ovratd1up
04-10-2012, 06:21 PM
One thing that would be really awesome, is forebidding HS players from earning first round checks. All undergrads have to be taken in the 2nd round. It lowers the risk level, raises the value of 2nd round picks, and gives the kids incentive to either stay in school or only come out if they think they believe they can recoup the lost lottery money with an earlier FA bid.

But HS kids are some of the ones that most need the money to help out their families. Many go into the draft because they have a guaranteed salary now, and even going to college brings risk of injury or deteriorated stock along with putting off the money. Don't give these kids an unguaranteed contract, man.

Risk level for the teams is not an issue when you look at the actually economic risk level of kids who may or may not make it.

Chronz
04-10-2012, 06:39 PM
But HS kids are some of the ones that most need the money to help out their families. Many go into the draft because they have a guaranteed salary now, and even going to college brings risk of injury or deteriorated stock along with putting off the money. Don't give these kids an unguaranteed contract, man.

Risk level for the teams is not an issue when you look at the actually economic risk level of kids who may or may not make it.

2nd round picks get gauranteed contracts, it may only be for a year or 2 but they are set to make more money in that span than a big chunk of the world makes for harder work.

Dont fall for the kids need money argument, they dont need millions.

TheNumber37
04-10-2012, 06:46 PM
uhh... don't draft em..

Ovratd1up
04-10-2012, 06:59 PM
2nd round picks get gauranteed contracts, it may only be for a year or 2 but they are set to make more money in that span than a big chunk of the world makes for harder work.

Dont fall for the kids need money argument, they dont need millions.

Nobody is putting it in front of my face or using it to coerce me, the argument is all too real. If they have the chance to use their talent to guarantee their family a better life, or at least a safer one, then they should have the right to take it. This really shouldn't even be on the same level of conversation as debating whether or not NBA talent would be improved, in my opinion. I understand it's just me, but I think it important to think of those in need rather than allow my views to be consumed by my own casual infatuation with the game's entertainment.

Besides, only one year is guaranteed and money management isn't a skill of these players (something that, in a system where college is obligatory, should be mandated of NBA prospects to take.)

NJBASEBALL22
04-10-2012, 07:17 PM
I agree with the author and the title. I think they should have to stay in college for 3 years. Makes college basketball better and makes the NBA better.

A big part of developing is developing their bodies and maturity too. The NFL has it right. I mean look at even the Hall of Famers... KG and Kobe (T-Mac too) are wearing down at a fast rate. KG's body started wearing down at 32-33, TMac at 26. Kobe started breaking down at 31. Kobe and KG still play at a high caliber but their bodies are obviously wearing down. There is a clear relationship between a lack of college PT and the body wearing down. Amare (health). Shawn Kemp (maturity and slowing down). Tyson Chandler (injury history). Kwayme Brown (Maturity). Eddy Curry (Maturity). Peja (back went at 29). There are more. I am willing to bet that LeBron and Dwight start to break down between the ages of 29-32.

Chronz
04-10-2012, 07:24 PM
Nobody is putting it in front of my face or using it to coerce me, the argument is all too real. If they have the chance to use their talent to guarantee their family a better life, or at least a safer one, then they should have the right to take it. This really shouldn't even be on the same level of conversation as debating whether or not NBA talent would be improved, in my opinion. I understand it's just me, but I think it important to think of those in need rather than allow my views to be consumed by my own casual infatuation with the game's entertainment.
Its not just you, but yes we are focusing solely on the issue of money/life here.


Besides, only one year is guaranteed and money management isn't a skill of these players (something that, in a system where college is obligatory, should be mandated of NBA prospects to take.)
My argument was that a 2nd round salary should be enough to take care of those worries. Hell couldnt a D-League salary get your family out of the ghetto? If you read "Can I Keep my Jersey" by Paul Shirley, you get the story of a person who made a living off of 10-day contracts and Euro league stops. Kids good enough to jump pro can go oversees and make money, point being there are options. Maybe those options arent for everyone and the life of a journeyman isnt ideal so Im not stating anything authoritative here, just what I believe.

You dont need millions to keep your family safe and fed. You probably wont agree but if your too stupid to manage money you deserve your fate, its not rocket science

Chronz
04-10-2012, 07:28 PM
I agree with the author and the title. I think they should have to stay in college for 3 years. Makes college basketball better and makes the NBA better.

A big part of developing is developing their bodies and maturity too. The NFL has it right. I mean look at even the Hall of Famers... KG and Kobe (T-Mac too) are wearing down at a fast rate. KG's body started wearing down at 32-33, TMac at 26. Kobe started breaking down at 31. Kobe and KG still play at a high caliber but their bodies are obviously wearing down. There is a clear relationship between a lack of college PT and the body wearing down. Amare (health). Shawn Kemp (maturity and slowing down). Tyson Chandler (injury history). Kwayme Brown (Maturity). Eddy Curry (Maturity). Peja (back went at 29). There are more. I am willing to bet that LeBron and Dwight start to break down between the ages of 29-32.
That was the main point I made in another thread, I think its more important for their career longevity. But it is a case to case thing, a guy like Tmac had a short shelf life to begin with due to his genetics, to him making the NBA and becoming as good as he can as fast as he can was more important to his legacy and livelihood.

Chronz
04-10-2012, 07:33 PM
uhh... don't draft em..

I think the biggest mistake the author makes is that hes acting as if these unskilled, net negative players take the floor all that much, if your a bad NBA player your not going to get much time so how could you possibly drag down the level of play in the NBA as a whole?