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JasonJohnHorn
09-16-2011, 12:39 AM
I think we've all gotten a kick out of the Sara Palin + Glenn Rice story, but I think we all also realize how tasteless the approach was on behalf of the writer who has published it. What I find interesting is how the story is being reported. Rather than simply stating that Palin allegedly had an affair with a college basketball player, I've heard media outlets single out the fact that Glenn Rice was black. Most the reports don't even name Rice, they simply refer to him as a black basketball player. This seems highly prejudicial to me. At first I was shaking my head because people were referring to him as a "Michigan" basketball player, where as I would have noted him as a NBA champion, or a former all-star, or Lakers' star, but as I've seen the story roll out in the news the focus seems to be on the fact that Rice is black. If she had slept with John Stockton, its not like they media would be announcing the fact that Stockton is white, but for some reason they feel the need to draw attention to the fact that Rice is black.

Anybody else bothered by this?

llemon
09-16-2011, 12:54 AM
Politics is a muhfuzz, ain't it?

Evolution23
09-16-2011, 01:16 AM
I don't wanna get banned so I can't spit the truth here

Tmath
09-16-2011, 01:24 AM
My sig says it all.

six
09-16-2011, 02:13 AM
Really?!? There is nothing prejudicial of calling someone a "Black" basketball player. Would it make you feel any better if we called him an "African" basketball player?

It's like your trying to hide your race/ethnicity. So what if someone called a black person...BLACK. Because that's what he is, BLACK.

It's no worse then calling Yao Ming Asian, or Dirk German.

gwrighter
09-16-2011, 02:51 AM
its the USA bro, you know the history. what more can I say.

Fresno
09-16-2011, 05:21 AM
Really?!? There is nothing prejudicial of calling someone a "Black" basketball player. Would it make you feel any better if we called him an "African" basketball player?

It's like your trying to hide your race/ethnicity. So what if someone called a black person...BLACK. Because that's what he is, BLACK.

It's no worse then calling Yao Ming Asian, or Dirk German.

Why is important to specifically single out Glen Rice's race when discussing him? Oh wait, its because there is still "shock value" out of any story of a White woman being with a Black man even in 2011 where there are more interracial relationships than ever. They keep referencing Glen Rice's race and profession as a way to make the story more scandalous by feeding off of the notion of Palin sleeping with a Big, Black Basketball player. Good thing Glen Rice, never played for Milwaukee, because the media would sarcastically refer to him as a Buck.

This is being fed to a certain group of Conservative/Teabag Party Americans who hold prejudices, some to the extent of actual racism against other races. These are the groups that boycotted Hallmark because in their Valentines Day commercial it showed a Black teenager giving a Valentine's Day card to his White girlfriend. If you've heard their quips about Obama, you can imagine how they would react to this story. The other group is some Liberals & others who are laughing at this story knowing how the Conservatives are reacting to seeing that Palin slept with a Black man once. So scandalous.:speechless: Its almost irrelevant that she could've slept with 30+ White guys.

In terms of Glen Rice being referenced as Black. I dont know why that should be even important to the story when he is an American basketball player. Would they reference Kevin McHale as being White if he were the player involved? No. You mention Yao being refered to as Chinese and Dirk being refered to as German, and those are legit considering that is their nationality in America. I'd much rather see a day where the media stops pointing out the race of Americans and just refer to them as what they are.

I've never been to Africa, so how am I African-American? Do you want to be referred to in anything you are involved with as a European-American? I mean its understandable if you're from Europe and now living in America, but if not then how proud of an American are you when you're referring to yourself first and foremost as a European? Think about it.

gwrighter
09-16-2011, 09:06 AM
Really?!? There is nothing prejudicial of calling someone a "Black" basketball player. Would it make you feel any better if we called him an "African" basketball player?

It's like your trying to hide your race/ethnicity. So what if someone called a black person...BLACK. Because that's what he is, BLACK.

It's no worse then calling Yao Ming Asian, or Dirk German.

i don't like to get involved but Yao is from Asia, Dirk, Germany. Hence y they r Asian & German respectively. But the "african americans" of today are from the USA. so by logic they should be referred to as something more fitting to their geographical origins. wherever that may be individually.

PleaseBeNice
09-16-2011, 04:43 PM
Please, for the love of god. get over it. It seems a lot of people look for something to complain about.

Geargo Wallace
09-16-2011, 05:07 PM
I thought Glen Rice was black?

sep11ie
09-16-2011, 05:10 PM
Sorry Malcom X. Welcome to PSD.

Dolfan305
09-16-2011, 05:31 PM
get over it buddy. The entire NBA is black, don't know what your complaining about

bmd1101
09-16-2011, 05:38 PM
I think we've all gotten a kick out of the Sara Palin + Glenn Rice story, but I think we all also realize how tasteless the approach was on behalf of the writer who has published it. What I find interesting is how the story is being reported. Rather than simply stating that Palin allegedly had an affair with a college basketball player, I've heard media outlets single out the fact that Glenn Rice was black. Most the reports don't even name Rice, they simply refer to him as a black basketball player. This seems highly prejudicial to me. At first I was shaking my head because people were referring to him as a "Michigan" basketball player, where as I would have noted him as a NBA champion, or a former all-star, or Lakers' star, but as I've seen the story roll out in the news the focus seems to be on the fact that Rice is black. If she had slept with John Stockton, its not like they media would be announcing the fact that Stockton is white, but for some reason they feel the need to draw attention to the fact that Rice is black.

Anybody else bothered by this?

The media has a political agenda? :speechless: I would have never guessed.... :facepalm:

smith&wesson
09-16-2011, 05:48 PM
there are plenty of rasists ppl every where. only a fool would tell you other wise. its sad but its true.

sammid21
09-16-2011, 06:02 PM
This is a huge problem that people who arent "minorities" wont get. Most of them say "get over it" or "stop whining" because they dont understand how it feels to be singled out by the color of your skin. When you know discrimination, whether it be hurtful or unhurtful, it still makes you shake your head in disgust because thats what they are looking at. Not the man but the color.

For them to point out "black nba player" is kind of racist because he is a known person yet they reffer to Rice like an anonymus person plus the color of his skin.

chicago lulz
09-16-2011, 07:07 PM
Martin Luther King Jr. laid down the foundation. The people didn't want to help finish it.

It is what it is, and the reason using "black nba player" is blown out of proportion is due to history, and rightfully so.

These situations will always be present in American society, journalism, media, what have you. Deal with it, get over it, stop whining, because at this point there isn't much you can do. Pointing it out isn't going to change anything.

I am a minority.

Korman12
09-16-2011, 07:23 PM
I'm a journalism grad, and one of the things certain branches of the media gets wrong constantly (outside, obviously, of sports journalism) is the context athletes have in society. Far, far too often outside of the pantheon of well-known athletes like Jordan and Tiger Woods, there's little appreciative context of who the people are.

For instance, and I'll always remember this, when Corey Lidle, the former MLB pitcher who died when his plane crashed into a building a few years ago, certain news outlets refused to say who he was, instead focusing on the plane crashing into a building as a tie in to 9/11-type tragedies. The fact of the matter was that Lidle, while not an All-Star, was known by millions and millions of people in the U.S. It wasn't just a plane crashing story, it was a professional player dying in a freak accident. But because he wasn't the all-known superstar, general media doesn't really concern itself with divulging who they are - exactly what this Glen Rice story sort of twisted itself into.

It's like when you see the entire Lakers roster on Keeping Up with the Kardashian's and they get (even Kobe) 2 seconds of air time. Basic reasoning; the media thinks people who watch things outside of sports don't really care about sports. It's stupid, but trust me with that. This isn't something I've just noticed.

So when CNN talks about the Rice-Palin story, they bring it as a Palin story with a black guy. It's ungodly ridiculous, but like chicago lulz said there's nothing you can do about it. Oh, and I'm in a minority too.

gwrighter
09-16-2011, 07:26 PM
Martin Luther King Jr. laid down the foundation. The people didn't want to help finish it.

It is what it is, and the reason using "black nba player" is blown out of proportion is due to history, and rightfully so.

These situations will always be present in American society, journalism, media, what have you. Deal with it, get over it, stop whining, because at this point there isn't much you can do. Pointing it out isn't going to change anything.

I am a minority.

Don't be a defeatist. there is much you can do, maybe not for yourself but for your next of kin. People need to set an equilibrium & buck trends. If no one speaks out on it what kind of example does that set for the kids? "its ok, don't speak out against racism because it will always exist." is not gonna cut it for the future. don't settle.

OGMarkWahlberg
09-16-2011, 07:26 PM
haha, big deal? People are racist, news like this still shocks you? Its not like they called him a derogartory word .. they called him a black basketball player, last time I checked this is exactly what he is.

gwrighter
09-16-2011, 07:43 PM
^its about the context, not semantics.

chicago lulz
09-16-2011, 09:53 PM
Don't be a defeatist. there is much you can do, maybe not for yourself but for your next of kin. People need to set an equilibrium & buck trends. If no one speaks out on it what kind of example does that set for the kids? "its ok, don't speak out against racism because it will always exist." is not gonna cut it for the future. don't settle.

How many times does one have to speak out on it until there is evolution in the process? I feel my post was worded poorly, as I'm not saying we should ignore it, let it slide, etc.

I agree we should definitely speak out, we should set an example for the generations we create after us, "not settle". But I just don't see small things changing something as big as this. We need an MLK type. A powerful speaker, someone WANTING to bring good into this world.

Until then, it's come to the point where I just don't see human kind evolving in any way, as far as primal instincts go.

And everything said, spoken out about, etc is just falling on deaf ears.
(I understand, if it get's through to at least one person, that's a difference, etc etc)

If I go any further, it'll just turn into a heated rant.

Trace
09-16-2011, 11:09 PM
I feel there must be a balance between political correctness and political incorrectness ( for the lack of a better term) but this is the media that we're talking about where sensationalism reigns supreme.

However, I don't think this story has any prejudicial connotations to it,rather, it seems to be a politically motivated message via racial controversies surrounding the Tea Party ( a political organization Palin campaigned for).