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PatsSoxKnicks
03-01-2011, 11:25 PM
Just wondering about the ones that we know do value advanced stats.

I know Denver, Houston, Cleveland (I believe Dan Rosenbaum works there), Boston, Portland, OKC do. There's probably some others I'm forgetting.

Any other teams?

How league wide is the use of advanced stats in basketball?

Unfortunately, I have a large suspicion that my Knicks are too stupid to use any advanced stats (I can probably thank the moron Dolan for that).

abe_froman
03-02-2011, 01:42 AM
dallas does to, even though cuban walked back from how much weight to give them just abit..and heard from someone(i think on this site)that said memphis does to

PatsSoxKnicks
03-02-2011, 03:00 AM
dallas does to, even though cuban walked back from how much weight to give them just abit..and heard from someone(i think on this site)that said memphis does to

Oh right, forgot about Dallas. I knew they did and I knew I was forgetting some teams.

Didn't know Memphis does.

Chronz
03-02-2011, 07:47 PM
Just wondering about the ones that we know do value advanced stats.

I know Denver, Houston, Cleveland (I believe Dan Rosenbaum works there), Boston, Portland, OKC do. There's probably some others I'm forgetting.

Any other teams?

How league wide is the use of advanced stats in basketball?

Unfortunately, I have a large suspicion that my Knicks are too stupid to use any advanced stats (I can probably thank the moron Dolan for that).

Ill try to find the list haves and have nots of stats but until then this might shine some light on the subject of the Knicks

http://espn.go.com/blog/truehoop/post/_/id/25595/the-knicks-could-use-a-good-geek

PatsSoxKnicks
03-02-2011, 08:00 PM
Ill try to find the list haves and have nots of stats but until then this might shine some light on the subject of the Knicks

http://espn.go.com/blog/truehoop/post/_/id/25595/the-knicks-could-use-a-good-geek

Yeah, I read that article. It doesn't prove that they don't but I've long suspected that the Knicks don't (the article certainly reinforces that opinion though).

KnicksorBust
03-02-2011, 10:16 PM
Miami does.

Chronz
03-11-2011, 06:40 PM
http://www.nbastuffer.com/component/option,com_glossary/Itemid,90/catid,44/func,view/term,NBA%20Teams%20That%20Have%20Analytics%20Depar tment/

http://www.red94.net/rocketscience-analytics-teams-nonanalytics-teams/5698/

Found it

Gators123
03-11-2011, 07:11 PM
This is from the Pistons.com mailbag from yesterday....


Matthew (Sarasota, Fla.): In an article about the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, it was mentioned that roughly 20 NBA teams have statistical analysis departments. Are the Pistons one of the 10 or so that do not employ a team of stat geeks?

Langlois: I talked with Pistons VP Scott Perry last summer about that, Matthew. At least as of that time, the Pistons did not have a dedicated numbers cruncher. That doesn’t mean the people on Joe Dumars’ staff don’t follow stats, even advanced stats. But Perry also said something that’s stuck with me. He spent a year in Seattle as Sam Presti’s assistant GM. OKC has been hailed as one of the pioneers in statistical analysis. Perry acknowledged they used it but said the degree to which they leaned on it has been overstated. He said it wasn’t anything to do with the numbers that led them to take Kevin Durant and Jeff Green in the 2007 draft.
http://www.nba.com/pistons/chat_mailbox/mailbag_110310_3.html

Chronz
03-12-2011, 12:59 AM
This is from the Pistons.com mailbag from yesterday....


http://www.nba.com/pistons/chat_mailbox/mailbag_110310_3.html

Of course not, they took Durant because Portland ignorantly ignored what the Stats said and took the conventional wisdom approach. Just gos to show, no matter what the stats say your always going to go with your gut. Even if 7/10 the stats get it right, your going to hope your that 30% where you hit a homerun.

PatsSoxKnicks
03-12-2011, 02:12 AM
http://www.nbastuffer.com/component/option,com_glossary/Itemid,90/catid,44/func,view/term,NBA%20Teams%20That%20Have%20Analytics%20Depar tment/

http://www.red94.net/rocketscience-analytics-teams-nonanalytics-teams/5698/

Found it

Thanks. This seems to be right in line with the 20 teams that they said were using analytics at the MIT Sloan Sports conf.

From the looks of it, you can definitely see the more successful teams over the last couple years use some form of analytics. It'd be interesting to see a study done like that over a larger sample. I'm sure it'd reinforce the idea that teams who use analytics are better off then the teams that don't. And I'd wager if you adjusted for the superstars (guys like Lebron, Durant, etc. who are appealing to stat guys and traditional guys), there'd be an even greater disparity between the analytics and non-analytics teams.

ChiSox219
03-15-2011, 12:46 AM
Of course not, they took Durant because Portland ignorantly ignored what the Stats said and took the conventional wisdom approach. Just gos to show, no matter what the stats say your always going to go with your gut. Even if 7/10 the stats get it right, your going to hope your that 30% where you hit a homerun.

What?

Chronz
03-15-2011, 06:17 PM
What?

Kevin Pritchards response to if their in house models are why they chose Oden, no all the #'s and markers said to draft Durant, he was the surefire star. But he wasnt 7ft 260

PatsSoxKnicks
03-16-2011, 07:15 AM
The Wizards use "advanced stats". Ted, the owner, is apparently a fan of the Stumbling on Wins book that Dave Berri wrote as well as Wayne Winston's Mathletics book.

http://www.tedstake.com/2010/05/01/stumbling-on-wins/
http://www.tedstake.com/2010/05/01/another-good-read/

ChiSox219
03-16-2011, 08:18 PM
Kevin Pritchards response to if their in house models are why they chose Oden, no all the #'s and markers said to draft Durant, he was the surefire star. But he wasnt 7ft 260

Link?

I just don't see how data from one year of college basketball can give justification for select one plate over the other when they are similar talents. Oren wasnt even healthy his year at OSU.

And at the NBA level, Oden showed glipses that he could at least the same impac KD has, shame about all those injuries.

Chronz
03-17-2011, 04:55 AM
Link?

I just don't see how data from one year of college basketball can give justification for select one plate over the other when they are similar talents. Oren wasnt even healthy his year at OSU.

And at the NBA level, Oden showed glipses that he could at least the same impac KD has, shame about all those injuries.
Took awhile but I just googled different combinations of Durant, Pritchard and stats, but I was wrong on who said it. It was an assistant consultant of the team but he knows the models they used but yes they mention his injuries in College and IIRC he was injured in HS as well.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/ball_dont_lie/post/Blazers-consultant-wouldn-t-have-drafted-Greg-Od?urn=nba-268861

If people that use analytics to predict player performance in the NBA, using performance analytics, meaning what they did in college, and they tell you they had Oden ranked higher than Durant, they are full of crap. There are very few statistical measures that would have rated Oden's system in college better than Durant's. Oden was injured his entire career, that one season at Ohio State. He had to shoot free throws left handed, was not efficient, didn't have a great statistical season.
Our numbers absolutely said they should pick Durant. It wasn't even close.

If you look my book, and this is a good point to bring back, this is a perfect example of using the numbers to make an unconventional or difficult decision. Conventional wisdom would tell you to take the big man. It wouldn't tell you to take Durant. It's the old thing about no one gets fired for buying IBM. No one ever gets fired for drafting a big man. If things had flipflopped and Oden had been amazing and Durant had just been a high-volume shooter and high-volume scorer, everyone would second-guess that just as much, if not more.
My disappointment was that, in a lot of ways, [the Blazers] made the safe choice versus what I thought was the right choice.

I think Kevin always made decisions that he thought were the right decisions. He could do some unconventional things. But I think a lot GMs would have made that same decision and a lot of them would have made it because they thought it was the safe decision.

John Walls Era
03-25-2011, 12:12 PM
You forgot Dallas. One of the first teams o use adv stats

ChiSox219
03-27-2011, 01:10 PM
came across this list while doing some unrelated research:

http://www.nbastuffer.com/component/option,com_glossary/Itemid,90/catid,44/func,view/term,NBA%20Teams%20That%20Have%20Analytics%20Depar tment/

the layout is cleaner at the link but here's the copy and paste:

Boston Celtics:
Mike Zarren (Asst. Exec. Director of Basketball Operations), David B. Sparks (Statistical Intern)
Cleveland Cavaliers:
Dan Rosenbaum (Consultant), David Lewin (Basketball Operations Seasonal Assistant)
Dallas Mavericks:
Roland Beech, (Director of Basketball Analytics) Wayne Winston (formerly worked for Mavs)
Denver Nuggets:
Dean Oliver, (formerly worked for Nuggets as Director of Quantitative Analysis)
Houston Rockets:
Daryl Morey (General Manager), Sam Hinkie (Vice President of Basketball Operations),
Ed Kupfer (Consultant), Eli Witus (Basketball Operations Analyst), Monte McNair (Basketball Operations Analyst)
Indiana Pacers:
Kevin Pelton (Consultant)
Los Angeles Lakers:
Chris Bodaken (Director of Video Services), Trey Tomjanovich (Software Provider)
Memphis Grizzlies:
Aaron Barzilai (Quantitative Analyst)
Miami Heat:
Bob Chaikin (Basketball Analyst)
Milwaukee Bucks:
Jon Nichols (Basketball Analytics Intern)
New Jersey Nets:
Milton Lee (Director of Basketball Operations), Ken Catanella (formerly worked for Nets as Coordinator of Statistical Analysis)
Oklahoma City:
Benjamin C. Alamar (Senior Quantitative Analyst),
Jesse Weinstein-Gould (Basketball Information Coordinator), Keith Goldner (Statistical Analysis Intern)
Orlando Magic:
Charles Klask (Scouting Information Manager)
Phoenix Suns:
Steve Ilardi (Analytics Consultant)
Portland Trail Blazers:
Rich Cho (GM), Justin Kubatko (Consultant), Ben Falk (Basketball Analytics Manager),
Jeff Ma (Consultant), Ryan Parker (Intern)
San Antonio Spurs:
Gabe Farkas (Consultant)
Toronto Raptors:
Alex Rucker (Consultant), Keith Boyarsky (Consultant)
Washington Wizards:
Bob Bellotti (Consultant), Joe Sill (Consultant),
Ryan Saunders (Assistant Coach/Statistical Analysis)

PatsSoxKnicks
08-25-2011, 10:23 AM
22 teams use advanced stats.

Gators123
09-27-2011, 12:49 PM
http://nba-point-forward.si.com/2011/09/27/the-pistons-are-getting-smart/


It was not surprising to find representatives from the Thunder, Mavericks, Celtics and Rockets over the weekend the New England Symposium on Statistics and Sports, a delightfully geeky conference held every two years at Harvard. Those clubs have long been ahead of the curve in using advanced statistics to inform decisions across their organizations. They have all purchased fancy camera equipment that tracks every player’s movement in every game they host, and they could tell you all about (among many other things) adjusted plus/minus formulas that get at what player combinations actually work.

But there was some legitimate buzz among the NBA folks in attendance when they realized the Pistons, not exactly known as a stat-savvy bunch, had a representative attending a conference known mostly for the sophisticated math involved in the presentations.

That representative was Robert Wentworth, a longtime leader at Platinum Equity, the private equity fund whose founder, Tom Gores, purchased the Pistons in June. (The firm itself also owns a chunk of the team.) Wentworth and Philip Norment, both based in Boston, will run the team full-time, though Gores of course will have a major hand in decision-making. Wentworth talked extensively about Platinum’s plans for the Pistons and how the organization hopes to incorporate advanced statistics into its planning.

SI.com: Some folks were sort of surprised the Pistons had someone at Harvard this weekend. But given your background, isn’t it sort of natural to look at how advanced statistics and algorithms might help your team?

Wentworth: We’re a private equity firm. This is our first move into professional sports, both for the firm and for Tom Gores, and we approach this like any other investment that we make. We will really try to understand best practices and be forward-thinking as opposed to reactionary. Getting heavily into statistical analysis seems quite natural to us.

SI.com: I mean, this is what PE firms do to find opportunities and value, right?

Wentworth: Yes, to an extent. The advanced stats just ought to be a part of your tool kit. It’s equally important to have really solid basketball people, and Joe Dumars has obviously been in this league for 25-plus years now. He has tremendous basketball intellect. But we’re just trying to make sure we use every tool in that took box, even if it means you just do a better job at finding that 8th, 9th or 10th guy.

SI.com: You guys just hired Charles Klask, who did this kind of work for the Magic and [Orlando head coach] Stan Van Gundy. How did you settle on him as the right guy to start this movement within the organization?

Wentworth: That was all Lawrence Frank (Detroit’s new head coach). He was out there beating the bushes and had come up with Charles as the guy who will help do all that game preparation. But he’s not the sole resource we’ll end up with at the end of the day.

SI.com: So you plan to hire more folks with this kind of background? Or spend more resources on this kind of research?

Wentworth: That is a pretty good assumption. There are various ways you can approach this, either through hiring in-house or using outside resources. Charles is going to focus on working with the coaching staff on a day-to-day basis, and we’ll continue to look at how statistical analysis can help us on the basketball operations side — in free agency and all of that.

SI.com: One thing that was brought up repeatedly at the conference is how the league isn’t quite as collegial as it used to be — how teams hoard data for themselves instead of sharing it. Have you talked to other teams — maybe the Celtics, for instance, given your Boston connections — for advice on how to get the lay of the land on advanced basketball stats?Are they receptive to it?

Wentworth: Everyone is doing their own thing, and it is all proprietary. It’s intellectual property now. I do have a relationship with the Celtics, and I tried to prod a bit there, but they told me it would be difficult to do. I spoke to a representative from the Rockets [at Harvard] about possibly taking a trip to Houston, and he thought it might be better to just get together when they visit Detroit. He was very pleasant about it.

You also have to remember: We were prohibited by league rules from talking to our own team executives or anyone from other teams until we closed on the deal, and we didn’t do that until June 2, and then we had to prepare for the draft and hire a coach. We have been drinking from a fire hose. We had actually talked to Joe [Dumars] a bit before closing, and we were reminded in a very public way that we were violating the rules. It was a meeting where Tom [Gores] was being interviewed for ownership approval, and [deputy commissioner] Adam Silver reminded us in front of everybody that we were not supposed to be talking to anyone. [Editor's note: Wentworth's tone here is good-natured; he is not at all angry or bitter toward Silver -- not even close.]

SI.com: How else have you tried at this early stage to get familiar with advanced basketball stats?

Wentworth: Well, going to conferences like the one at Harvard. And it helps that Lawrence Frank came out of Boston last season. We’re not trying to pump him for information or anything, but he clearly has an understanding now of how the Celtics use the information they have. And that’s the important thing we see — the ability to not only have this information, but to have the right people so that it gets communicated, translated and accepted by the basketball side.