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View Full Version : Very interesting read on pace/shot clock usage



superkegger
01-25-2011, 04:36 PM
http://www.sbnation.com/nba/2011/1/24/1952725/nba-pace-speed-spurs-suns-knicks


At this juncture, a number of intriguing details present themselves. First of all, while a number of elite defensive teams force opponents to shoot late in the shot clock (New Orleans, Orlando, Chicago, Milwaukee), many great defensive teams do not do this (Miami, San Antonio, Lakers, Boston). In fact, there is not a statistically significant relationship between defensive efficiency and defensive speed index.

But the low speeds of certain teams offer explanations as to their defensive footprints. The New Orleans Hornets, the league’s slowest defensive team, utilize heavy doses of zone defense and aggressive rotations to force extra passes and minimize opponent drives. This naturally extends the time in the shot clock at which opponents finally attempt shots.

The craziest data point, of course, belongs to the San Antonio Spurs. Opponents shoot earlier in the shot clock against the Spurs than against any other team in the league. It’s difficult to specify exactly why this is. The Spurs are a great defensive rebounding team and thus do not give up many put-backs early in new shot clocks. They’re about league average in fast break points allowed. They foul less often than any other team in the NBA and thus aren’t sending opponents to the line in penalty situations. Moreover, the Spurs rank in the top five in lowest field goal percentage allowed on shots taken early in the shot clock.

So what gives? Your guess is as good as mine. But the overall point is San Antonio’s increased pace this year is largely a function of defensive speed index as opposed to offensive speed index.

We can extend the question "is a team’s speed driven more by their offense or their defense?" to the rest of the league as well.

Very intriguing read about speed/pace factor. I reccomend reading the whole article, really very interesting stuff.

Crackadalic
01-25-2011, 05:11 PM
My mind is blown by reading it but very interesting article

Chronz
01-25-2011, 05:54 PM
I always knew pace factor never strongly correlated with efficiency scores on either end but I never looked at a teams offense/defense speed index. I always wondered whether a team had a middling pace rating because they kept opponents from shooting early but ran themselves. Great find, pace rating generally does the trick but this study really opens up the door for precise analysis in todays game.

superkegger
01-25-2011, 06:06 PM
I always knew pace factor never strongly correlated with efficiency scores on either end but I never looked at a teams offense/defense speed index. I always wondered whether a team had a middling pace rating because they kept opponents from shooting early but ran themselves. Great find, pace rating generally does the trick but this study really opens up the door for precise analysis in todays game.

Yeah, the intriguing thing about it, is that there's still room for improvement on this analysis, since the shot clock usage times used, were still broad. Even more detailed tracking of that, would really provide a more in depth look at the whole issue.