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bears88
12-08-2010, 02:35 PM
The NBA owners aren't the only ones looking to alter the landscape of the league over the next several seasons through the league's collective bargaining agreement.

While the owners want to do away with the soft salary cap and guaranteed contracts, the players hope to end the age restriction that forbids players from entering the NBA directly out of high school.

"We want to go back to the way it was," a source from the NBA Players Association said. "The players have always been philosophically opposed to it. The vast majority of players feel a player should have the right to make a living. If he has the talent and wants to make money to help his family, he should have that right. It's just a matter of principle."

NBA Players Association executive director Billy Hunter sent an audio podcast detailing the union's proposal to every player last week. The proposal, which includes the end of the age restriction, have been obtained by ESPN.com and confirmed by a union source.

In its proposal, the union, while rejecting the owners' call for a hard salary cap and salary reductions, is also willing to negotiate a reduction in league revenue guarantees for players. the union also proposes rule changes that would provide more flexibility for sign-and-trade deals.

The age restriction, which requires a player to be at least 19 years old during the calendar year of the draft as well as at least one year removed from his high school graduation class, has been in place since the 2005-2006 season. A league spokesman refused to comment when asked Wednesday about the union's proposed change to the age restriction.

The league did not address the age requirement specifically in the collective bargaining proposal it submitted to players in February. But Commissioner David Stern's desire has long been to raise the minimum age to 20 rather than to lower it.

While there are much larger issues separating the sides, the age restriction could become a bargaining chip in the stalemated negotiations between owners and players that appear headed toward a lockout next summer.

Hunter said last month he's "99 percent sure" there will be a lockout, and a look at the proposals of each side reveals Hunter may have underestimated the chances of a work stoppage.

The union's contract proposal was given to the owners in July, but it seems to have barely registered with the owners, who have neither provided a counterproposal nor backed off the demands they made in February. The league also refused to comment Wednesday on the details of the union's proposal.

"Our proposal was designed to move the negotiations forward, to be a win-win for both sides," the union source said. "We looked to address some of the owners' concerns and the proposal had elements that would benefit both sides. But the owners have sat on this for five months."

While the union rejects the owners' demands for a hard cap, an $800 million cut in salaries, a shortening of contract lengths, and an elimination of guaranteed contracts, it is willing to negotiate a reduction in the percentage of league revenue players are guaranteed.

Players are currently guaranteed 57 percent of basketball-related income, and the players are willing to remove that guarantee. No new figure was proposed by the union, which is also open to considering adjustments to revenue formulas for owners who build new arenas or significantly renovate existing ones.

The Players Association also proposed, according to the podcast, "enhanced trade and signing flexibility." Basically, it wants to change the system in a way that would make it easier for teams to make trades.

Currently, in trades involving a team that is above the salary cap, the traded players' salaries must fall within 125 percent of one another. The union would like to at least double that percentage. That would make it easier for cash-strapped clubs to receive financial relief by trading away players with large contracts.

The union suggests ending the complicated "base-year compensation" rule that often makes it difficult to pull off trades.

"We want to keep the current system in place, and address some of the owners' concerns within the context of that system," the source said. "We want to keep the soft cap we've had for 30 years and keep salaries tied to revenues."

In the past, the players have had no say in how the owners have shared their revenue among themselves. But with the owners complaining about millions of dollars in annual losses, the union proposed in July that the league incorporate "meaningful revenue sharing."

The players do not believe the burden for giving small-market clubs financial relief should fall entirely upon them. Thus, they're proposing that the league share not only national revenue --such as television contracts, sponsorships and gate receipts -- but also local revenue as well.

The union also suggests the league could give small markets a larger share of the national revenue.

Staunchly against a hard cap, which would eliminate longtime collective bargaining staples such as the Larry Bird exception, the union also noted that it wants to not only keep the mid-level exception but add a second mid-level exception.

In exchange, the players would give up the "bi-annual exception," which is currently worth $2 million, and decrease the maximum length of mid-level contracts from five years to four years.

The players are also looking to shorten the time period (currently seven days) that teams have to match offers for restricted free agents, as well as gain better pension benefits.

The union has been anticipating a lockout for more than a year and has been advising its players regularly to save money in preparation for a work stoppage.

The players are ready to fight to keep the key elements of the current system, as evidenced by the attendance of superstars such as LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Carmelo Anthony and Chris Paul at a negotiating meeting in August.

The players were galvanized in part after union representatives showed them power point presentations that explained exactly how much money they would lose if the owners' proposal was accepted. For instance, the $18 million Joe Johnson is slated to make next season would fall to about $11 million under the owners' proposed system, with less than $5 million guaranteed.

The owners are digging in as well, with one source close to several owners saying "they will not budge" from their current proposal. If the two sides haven't moved significantly closer to one another by the February All-Star Break, a lockout would seem inevitable.

"We're not planning to make another proposal, in part because the owners have not made a counterproposal" the union source said. "They don't seem to want to make a deal early

http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=5899152

yanks19791024
12-08-2010, 02:38 PM
I think NBA should do with the NFL does, 3 years then turn pro.

Frrrrank!!!
12-08-2010, 02:53 PM
God I hope there isn't a lockout, I couldn't go a year without basketball.

ShakeN'Bake
12-08-2010, 03:00 PM
I think NBA should do with the NFL does, 3 years then turn pro.

No way. 2 years MAX.

Although I don't necessarily agree with the 1 year rule I'm ok with it.

ShakeN'Bake
12-08-2010, 03:02 PM
God I hope there isn't a lockout, I couldn't go a year without basketball.

WNBA :shrug:

haha just kidding.

I feel the same, I'd have to watch tons more college hoops but it just wouldn't be the same.

jkiddvc20
12-08-2010, 03:03 PM
Im one of the select few that feels if you wanna come straight out of a highschool you should be allowed to. Not saying teams should take them, but I dont think it should be banned.

Frrrrank!!!
12-08-2010, 03:09 PM
WNBA :shrug:

haha just kidding.

I feel the same, I'd have to watch tons more college hoops but it just wouldn't be the same.

Yeah, I guess I should of said I can't go a year without the Celtics. lol

Crackadalic
12-08-2010, 03:48 PM
I find it funny that players like Rubio can go pro at 14 but someone from that states who want to make a living from basketball has to go to prolong that and go to college for a year and with all these NCAA rules IMO are dumb i wouldnt be surprise if players go pro over seas because of this

Klivlend
12-08-2010, 03:58 PM
I think NBA should do with the NFL does, 3 years then turn pro.

I thought you could leave after your sophmore year, no?

Madness23
12-08-2010, 04:21 PM
why not, players would love to get paid till they die and beyond

richiesaurus310
12-08-2010, 04:34 PM
I always wondered why elite high school prospects play college football and not in some other professional league like in canada or in the USFL???

tbone2171
12-08-2010, 04:57 PM
I always wondered why elite high school prospects play college football and not in some other professional league like in canada or in the USFL???

Because the exposure of NCAA DI College Football trumps any other professional league.

dtmagnet
12-08-2010, 05:13 PM
I like it the way it is, makes the March Madness that much better.

topdog
12-08-2010, 05:20 PM
I actually have come around to a 2yr. wait like Michael Wilbon talks about in his 1st ESPN.com column (just read it today, not really trying to promote it). I really think education and college coaching would really benefit a lot of these guys in addition to the exposure and competition of nationally televised NCAA games.

Super.
12-08-2010, 05:30 PM
I thought you could leave after your sophmore year, no?

If you were redshirted

cle12152433
12-08-2010, 05:40 PM
What about something like this?

All players graduating HS interested in entering the draft can participate in an NBA type combine with college players, and after the combine, they can see what they were graded and where they are projected to be picked (sorta like what you hear in college football about players submitting paperwork to see where they would get drafted).

If the results are good, let them declare for the draft. If not, they can choose to attend college, but they must play for a MINIMUM of two seasons, after which they can choose whether or not to enter the draft or stay at school.

I say 2 years in basketball, because I would think the three yr rule in college for football is a safety issue, so the young pork chops dont have to go against the big pieces of meat and get blown up.

NYY 26 to 7
12-08-2010, 05:42 PM
I find it funny that players like Rubio can go pro at 14 but someone from that states who want to make a living from basketball has to go to prolong that and go to college for a year and with all these NCAA rules IMO are dumb i wouldnt be surprise if players go pro over seas because of this

Thats fine then do the Brandon Jennings and go overseas for a year no one really cares that much. Keep the rule as is the league was becoming littered with high school players who weren't good enough or just not ready. Make a living and taking care of their family - if they are actually good they will be in an even better position after a year of college. Their family (even if very poor) has made it ok without millions thus far and face it most of these real high level players get money in college anyway. I would never feel bad if a guy was thought to be a high pick outa high school and then didn't make or his stock fell big time. This should not be up to the players it should be up to the people paying these guys. College makes these guys better if even just for a year.

AddiX
12-08-2010, 05:44 PM
Keep the age restricting, when you look around the league, especially at bad teams, you see a bunch of young kids who don't offer anything to the roster or the quality of NBA.

I'm tired of hearing about young players ceilings and watching as they go no where when there are good players who could be playing.

Bad teams suck and than they dump there entire franchise to top notch teams for a bunch of draft picks and young players. It's getting real old.

Mane
12-08-2010, 05:44 PM
The age restriction, while good for the game, absolutely destroys the college game.

If you want to play in college, you should have to go at least 2 years, if not, go straight to the pros.. it only makes sense to me. One and dones are terrible for the NCAA.

Byronicle
12-08-2010, 06:05 PM
taking off the school restriction would be absolutely stupid

just think about it, not many people make it to the nba from college, getting rid of the restriction only increases that number of people except the only difference is that there will be more people with a backup in case they don't make it to the nba

you got to make the nba to get paid

Mplsman
12-08-2010, 06:58 PM
I'm fine with what it is now.

NYY 26 to 7
12-08-2010, 07:35 PM
The age restriction, while good for the game, absolutely destroys the college game.

If you want to play in college, you should have to go at least 2 years, if not, go straight to the pros.. it only makes sense to me. One and dones are terrible for the NCAA.

Disagree - first of all one and done did not start with this rule that has and always will happen. Would you have rather seen John Wall for one year or not at all? How sick would it have been to see how Lebron did in college? Making better players go to college improves the talent level and makes everything more exciting. There will always be one and dones.

avrpatsfan
12-08-2010, 08:16 PM
I don't understand the age restriction. It makes no sense.

The Raven
12-08-2010, 08:27 PM
I actually agree with the age restriction.

NYKalltheway
12-08-2010, 09:31 PM
People who wanna get drafted right after high school should be able to do so. And if picked, join that team.

I think college basketball does not need to die like this, since we basically know high school talents that are really good from a very young age (youtube will become the best draft scout tool :facepalm: )
College players should graduate from college. Just like it used to be. I like how the player's union says that they want it just how it used to be... Why not have it the ORIGINAL WAY? College ball is more fun than the NBA these days. At least you don't know who will reach the Final Four in college while we knew the last 3 seasons' NBA winners... and even conference finalists

Also salary cap is useless as it is. Either scrap the whole thing, or have a hard cap. An actual salary cap. Not have the Lakers with $100m worth of salaries and Minnesota to have around $50m!
Just find a figure, maybe $70m. So that everybody wins. And no minimum annual salaries. Just let the franchises run themselves however they want.

JWO35
12-08-2010, 09:54 PM
You should be able to go straight from HS to the NBA...players like Rose, Durant, Blake Griffin, and Wall all would have came out of HS. IMO more talent would be in the NBA, it may or may not narrow the talent gap between teams...but for every LeBron there's a Kwame. That being said allow players to enter the draft from HS, but draft at your own risk.

BTW, Amir Johnson was the last player to be drafted out of HS! Credit for Dumars for drafting him, only if he got decent PT in Detroit :pity:

Niro
12-09-2010, 07:38 AM
this age restriction is some ********..its only in america too

maradona turned pro when he was 16 and was one of the greatest ever..

why not let player go to the nba when they have the talent and are able to earn a lot of money?

at the end of the day they still have to get drafted from some team

NYKalltheway
12-09-2010, 08:57 PM
this age restriction is some ********..its only in america too



Heck in Europe they force you to have young players (Under 21) on the team :cool:

MGB
12-09-2010, 09:13 PM
This whole thing is just a racket to help college basketball and potentially save the owners money. The age limit is all about money; think about how much money Texas and Ohio State made off of Kevin Durant and Greg Oden respectively. Conversely, the owners save money by not having to pay guys who come out and bust hard.