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DodgerBlue8188
10-11-2010, 01:54 PM
I知 looking at baseball encyclopedia and mlb.com stats for WHIP and it does not seem like an individual pitchers WHIP is being accurately stated. For example, Clayton Kershaw pitched 204 1/3 IP in 2010. He gave up 160 hits, walked 81 batters and intentionally walked 9 batters.

But all the WHIP stats I知 getting for him are 1.179. Well, you get 1.179 by adding 160+81=241 241/204 1/3 equals 1.179

They are leaving off IBB which is 9. If you add in 9 you値l get 1.223 as a WHIP

Am I missing something here? Again, both MLB.com and Baseball encyclopedia are stating a WHIP of 1.179 but that would be excluding IBB which should be included.

Thanks

DodgerBlue8188
10-11-2010, 01:55 PM
The only thing I can think of is if they are double entrying walks. Which means the 81 already includes the 9 intentional walks.

VRP723
10-11-2010, 02:08 PM
The only thing I can think of is if they are double entrying walks. Which means the 81 already includes the 9 intentional walks.

That's probably it

Gigantes4Life
10-11-2010, 06:44 PM
They're probably counting HBP.

DodgerBlue8188
10-11-2010, 06:57 PM
They're probably counting HBP.

HBP is not counted in WHIP.

Gigantes4Life
10-11-2010, 08:02 PM
They might be counting it though, that's what I'm saying.

Some consider it.

Toirtap
10-11-2010, 11:01 PM
As you correctly surmised, intentional walks are a subset of walks in the statistics. Adding them in would be double-counting.

brewersfan729
10-12-2010, 01:52 AM
Am I the only one who hates intentional walks being included in WHIP? Who's to say the pitcher doesn't get the batter out if his manager lets him pitch to the batter?

Gigantes4Life
10-12-2010, 03:09 AM
There's always flaws with the older statistics, it's why I tend to stay away from them.

fanofclendennon
10-17-2010, 08:59 AM
HBP is not counted in WHIP.

Never understood that. What is the rationale? Anyone know?

Toirtap
10-17-2010, 11:42 AM
WHIP was originally a rotisserie category. They used stats that were widely available in newspapers in the early 1980s.

Since WHIP is used as a quick indicator, there's really not much utility to adding in HB. Most analysts would prefer to have opponents' OBA (they are essentially the same concept, except one is the proportion of baserunners to baserunners + batting outs, and one is just the ratio of baserunners to all outs), and that includes HB.