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thescore53
09-15-2010, 12:07 PM
is it better if a rookie enters a team as a starter but doesn't get all the shots but is a starter and gets heavy minutes playing alongside great players. so he can hopefully learn from them.



or


he is given the keys to the team as soon he is drafted.

llemon
09-15-2010, 12:09 PM
Depends on the rookie.

Baller1
09-15-2010, 12:12 PM
Exactly what llemon said. It depends on the rookie. For example, Tyreke is a player that you give the keys to and say "save us from mediocrity".

thekmp211
09-15-2010, 12:37 PM
four possibilities all depending on situation

1. good team, polished rookie, ease him into small but important role see if he thrives (prince, pistons)

2. good team, raw rookie, let him sit and develop for a couple years before unleashing (jermaine oneal, blazers)

3. bad team, polished rookie, give him the keys and let him learn to run the show (tyreke evans, kings)

4. bad team, raw rookie, difficult spot for the franchise because they probably expected an instant contributor and instead have a project that does nothing to move them forward (any of the 5 millions project centers the sonics drafted earlier in the decade)


i feel like this is how it plays out, generally. it's also contingent on how well they learn, injuries, physical capabilities ect. i wouldn't say that one particular approach is going to garner better results. that's why talent development is so difficult and so important.

Boo2u
09-15-2010, 12:39 PM
For the few elite rookies that can handle a starting job out of the gate, put them right into the fire. That is, assuming they have the right supporting cast.

Otherwise, most rookies are better off getting a year on the bench to learn from the veterans, the coaches, and get familiar with NBA speed of play and competition levels.

Boo2u
09-15-2010, 12:40 PM
four possibilities all depending on situation

1. good team, polished rookie, ease him into small but important role see if he thrives (prince, pistons)

2. good team, raw rookie, let him sit and develop for a couple years before unleashing (jermaine oneal, blazers)

3. bad team, polished rookie, give him the keys and let him learn to run the show (tyreke evans, kings)

4. bad team, raw rookie, difficult spot for the franchise because they probably expected an instant contributor and instead have a project that does nothing to move them forward (any of the 5 millions project centers the sonics drafted earlier in the decade)


i feel like this is how it plays out, generally. it's also contingent on how well they learn, injuries, physical capabilities ect. i wouldn't say that one particular approach is going to garner better results. that's why talent development is so difficult and so important.


What about all those average teams? ;)

Klivlend
09-15-2010, 01:02 PM
four possibilities all depending on situation

1. good team, polished rookie, ease him into small but important role see if he thrives (prince, pistons)

2. good team, raw rookie, let him sit and develop for a couple years before unleashing (jermaine oneal, blazers)

3. bad team, polished rookie, give him the keys and let him learn to run the show (tyreke evans, kings)

4. bad team, raw rookie, difficult spot for the franchise because they probably expected an instant contributor and instead have a project that does nothing to move them forward (any of the 5 millions project centers the sonics drafted earlier in the decade)


i feel like this is how it plays out, generally. it's also contingent on how well they learn, injuries, physical capabilities ect. i wouldn't say that one particular approach is going to garner better results. that's why talent development is so difficult and so important.

HAHAHAHA! You mean like Mohammed Sene, Johan Petro and Robert Swift? To name a few.

thekmp211
09-15-2010, 01:09 PM
What about all those average teams? ;)

ahah fair enough. i assumed we were talking big name/lottery types. for the mid first rounders, well...if they're good they play and if they aren't they don't. usually enough room to shine when you are middle of the pack.