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Panamax
08-03-2010, 04:34 PM
I've been observing the interaction - both subtle and overt - between hitters and umps for quite some time now and it's my conclusion that way too many ballplayers unwittingly sabotage their chances of becoming baserunners and/or driving-in runs (when the bases are loaded) by involuntary reflex.

Assuming a pitch is a ball, they dash-off to 1st. base only to be called back or out on strikes. In many cases the ball is as much as a foot out of the strike zone, but the umpire, not wanting to be "shown-up" or to show who's boss, will arbitrarily call the pitch a strike, particularly when there's three-ball count.

Very few players have the presence of mind and discipline to await the umpire's call. Those who do, are often rewarded by helping their team win eventually and in many cases, immediately via the winning walk-off RBI.

Your feedback, please...

theLgndKllr35
08-03-2010, 04:41 PM
That's a bold statement.

Panamax
08-03-2010, 04:53 PM
That's a bold statement.Well, I guess it is that, if only because it's in bold text, but do you agree with it?

Pittz
08-03-2010, 05:02 PM
That's a bold statement.

:laugh2:

carson005
08-03-2010, 05:05 PM
Yeah I consider that true.

VinceCarter
08-03-2010, 05:26 PM
I've been observing the interaction - both subtle and overt - between hitters and umps for quite some time now and it's my conclusion that way too many ballplayers unwittingly sabotage their chances of becoming baserunners and/or driving-in runs (when the bases are loaded) by involuntary reflex.

Assuming a pitch is a ball, they dash-off to 1st. base only to be called back or out on strikes. In many cases the ball is as much as a foot out of the strike zone, but the umpire, not wanting to be "shown-up" or to show who's boss, will arbitrarily call the pitch a strike, particularly when there's three-ball count.

Very few players have the presence of mind and discipline to await the umpire's call. Those who do, are often rewarded by helping their team win eventually and in many cases, immediately via the winning walk-off RBI.

Your feedback, please...

You can't be shown up if it is the correct call :eyebrow:

Panamax
08-03-2010, 05:37 PM
You can't be shown up if it is the correct call :eyebrow:I meant "shown-up" not in terms of right or wrong calls, but it terms of the player undermining the ump's authority. :cool:

Padres Son
08-03-2010, 05:42 PM
I think it's actually the opposite. When a pitch comes in on a 3-ball count, it seems like if the pitch is close and the batter freezes and just stands there without making a move towards first, he's almost telling the ump to call a strike... and in many cases the ump will call a strike.

I think it's smart for the batter to make a move towards first.

Pittz
08-03-2010, 05:52 PM
I think it's actually the opposite. When a pitch comes in on a 3-ball count, it seems like if the pitch is close and the batter freezes and just stands there without making a move towards first, he's almost telling the ump to call a strike... and in many cases the ump will call a strike.

I think it's smart for the batter to make a move towards first.

The power of suggestion!

Panamax
08-03-2010, 05:56 PM
I think it's actually the opposite. When a pitch comes in on a 3-ball count, it seems like if the pitch is close and the batter freezes and just stands there without making a move towards first, he's almost telling the ump to call a strike... and in many cases the ump will call a strike.

I think it's smart for the batter to make a move towards first.On one thing we can agree - that is to disagree. I maintain that making a move to first base will invariably influence the ump's call to the contrary.

Bryrob58
08-03-2010, 11:11 PM
On one thing we can agree - that is to disagree. I maintain that making a move to first base will invariably influence the ump's call to the contrary.

Guy I realize that your trying to fit in with your own style, but drop the bold print... I didn't even read the original post because all I could think of is you talking like the announcer from Superfriends when you typed it.

sexicano31
08-03-2010, 11:27 PM
I honestly think this is the way it should be. Like its the umpires way of saying, "Get back her boy. I make the calls, not you."

sexicano31
08-03-2010, 11:29 PM
Guy I realize that your trying to fit in with your own style, but drop the bold print... I didn't even read the original post because all I could think of is you talking like the announcer from Superfriends when you typed it.

:laugh: Meanwhile, aquaman and his trusted dolphin partners...

Zaunnie
08-03-2010, 11:32 PM
:laugh: Meanwhile, aquaman and his trusted dolphin partners...

his name is Seaman.

sexicano31
08-03-2010, 11:42 PM
his name is Seaman.

Partners with the prophet Muhammad?

hugepatsfan
08-03-2010, 11:53 PM
Umpires (and officials in all sports) need to get the **** over themselves. No one wants to see them. Even their own mothers get pissed when they show their faces on the screen. Honestly, no one cares about their "authority." Bunch of attention whores.

avrpatsfan
08-03-2010, 11:59 PM
Please don't us all bold. Anyways, I think you're right that that can influence the umps calls.

avrpatsfan
08-04-2010, 12:00 AM
Umpires (and officials in all sports) need to get the **** over themselves. No one wants to see them. Even their own mothers get pissed when they show their faces on the screen. Honestly, no one cares about their "authority." Bunch of attention whores.
Agreed. Umps want their own moments. It's so damn irritating.

Bryrob58
08-04-2010, 12:03 AM
Agreed. Umps want their own moments. It's so damn irritating.

I still believe, even after seeing him cry, that Jim Joyce intended on breaking up Galarraga's perfect game. He knew, before that pitch was thrown, that if there was a close call at first he was going to give it to the runner. Isn't it an unwritten rule that all close calls go to the pitcher? Maybe I'm backwards on this one. Either way, Joyce knew what the hell he was doing.

sexicano31
08-04-2010, 12:21 AM
I still believe, even after seeing him cry, that Jim Joyce intended on breaking up Galarraga's perfect game. He knew, before that pitch was thrown, that if there was a close call at first he was going to give it to the runner. Isn't it an unwritten rule that all close calls go to the pitcher? Maybe I'm backwards on this one. Either way, Joyce knew what the hell he was doing.

Iv always heard that the "tie" goes to the runner, even tho it wasnt close to a tie in that situation

Panamax
08-04-2010, 03:45 AM
Guy I realize that your trying to fit in with your own style, but drop the bold print... I didn't even read the original post because all I could think of is you talking like the announcer from Superfriends when you typed it.First of all, given that you don't know me, it's presumptuous of you to judge or make assumptions of any kind. Secondly, my bold text has nothing to do with personal style and all to do with a sight impediment, and lastly, your analogy is lost on me.