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View Full Version : BP (Bobby) scales back Crosstown Cup sponsorship



Matchstckman
06-02-2010, 05:53 PM
The BP oil spill in the Gulf has leaked into the company's sponsorship of the BP Crosstown Cup, the six-game series between the Cubs and White Sox that kicks off next week.

The company is still sponsoring the series, but "we've scaled back efforts a little bit" as a result of events in the Gulf, said Kevin Saghy, a Cubs spokesman. He said BP has already started some in-store promotions for the Cup, but has cut back on other planned events, as well as media buys and media outreach. The teams are also considering a more sober presentation of the trophy, Saghy said.

The Cubs are "loyal to their business partners," he added. "We are standing by [BP] as they go through this tough time."
Still, the organizers wanted to acknowledge "what's happening off the field" and let BP focus their efforts on the Gulf spill, Saghy said.

This year is the first of a multi-year sponsorship agreement with the oil company. The series will still be called the BP Crosstown Cup and BP's logo will still be visible in signage for the event.

"The BP situation is unfortunate, but from our perspective, we still have the games to play on the field," Saghy said. "Our fans are still excited about the series...Both teams expect it to be a long-standing tradition in Chicago, and something we hope to build excitement for in years moving forward.

http://www.chicagobreakingbusiness.com/2010/06/bp-scales-back-crosstown-cup-sponsorship-efforts.html


I'm kind of surprised and disappointed they didn't refuse the sponsorship completely after what happened. Maybe it was too late.

Kirel
06-02-2010, 06:26 PM
http://www.chicagobreakingbusiness.com/2010/06/bp-scales-back-crosstown-cup-sponsorship-efforts.html


I'm kind of surprised and disappointed they didn't refuse the sponsorship completely after what happened. Maybe it was too late.
I don't think they get to refuse it. The teams aren't going to give the money back after all, and by the looks of the looks of it they have a standing contract.

semperfi
06-02-2010, 06:36 PM
I don't think they get to refuse it. The teams aren't going to give the money back after all, and by the looks of the looks of it they have a standing contract.

You would think there would be a clause within the contract for something like this. BP is falling face first in their own poo on this oil spill.

Kirel
06-02-2010, 07:07 PM
You would think there would be a clause within the contract for something like this. BP is falling face first in their own poo on this oil spill.
I dunno, when I'm writing a contract my initial thought isn't "OK, what if we are embroiled in massive public relations disaster that might upset a half dozen cubs fans because we have Cubs cups in our gas stations", not sure why you would ever think that.

Arbitrary escape clauses aren't generally popular things in contracts. They defeat the purpose of a contract.

ggross
06-05-2010, 11:56 AM
A Sox fan is about to take over BP soon anyway - I doubt that little private contracts will stop the government from "making things right" with everybody. And God forbid if BP tries to survive or does anything to restore their image.

Yagyu+
06-05-2010, 01:50 PM
Nice article from The Nation (http://www.thenation.com/article/one-case-against-bp-wall-street-and-war) on the BP spill. It's only about a page, and worth the read -- as are the links to other articles within. Sorry if this isn't the best venue, but here's an excerpt:


Peter Sutherland, chairman of BP’s board for the past decade, had headed Goldman Sachs International and, in the 1990s, was a director of the World Trade Organization.

Last year Sutherland touted BP’s founders as the “cream of Edwardian society” who organized the Anglo-Persian oil company in 1909 with a concession from the Shah of Persia.

Kicked out of Iraq by former president Saddam Hussein in the 1960s, BP recently has been rewarded with the concession to exploit what “could be one of the largest expansions of crude-oil production ever achieved anywhere”, according to the Wall Street Journal.

[BP PLC Tuesday awarded $500 million in contracts to drill wells in Iraq's giant Rumaila oil field, the first step in a mammoth initiative by foreign oil companies to revive the country's energy industry.

If successful, the effort at Rumaila and several other fields near Basra could be one of the largest expansions of crude-oil production ever achieved anywhere. Increased Iraq production could be the difference between a well-supplied global market with oil steadily trading below today's $82 a barrel and a tight oil market with triple-digit prices, struggling to meet rising Asian demand.]

The BP-Halliburton connection was not only forged in Iraq, but in underwater catastrophes in 2009 in Australia’s sea of Timor and explosion two weeks ago of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig off the southern US coast. Halliburton performed the concrete work that preceded both spills, and the New York Times reports a Halliburton employee has acknowledged “that he made the problem worse” during the Australian spill. As for the recent disaster, Halliburton officials claim it would be “premature and irresponsible to speculate” on the cause.