PDA

View Full Version : Simmons: How to Fix the NBA



unwantedplayer
02-24-2010, 06:34 PM
When the Writers Guild of America went on strike in 2007, something fascinating happened: The networks, production companies and movie studios slowly realized their infrastructure made no real sense. They had been handing out too many developmental deals, green-lighting too many pilots and overpaying for too many movies for far too long. It was a broken model. Only when that massive overhead was removed for a few months and Hollywood didn't collapse did everyone realize, "Wait a second, were we doing this the right way?"

The answer, clearly, was no. The old way was like watching two people battle over entrée choices for dinner, then playing it safe by ordering everything on the menu. When the strike ended right as the economy was turning, new Hollywood tightened its belt, stopped overdeveloping and aimed for a higher batting average. Frugality and caution now carry the day. Sure, A-listers earn as much money as they always did, and expensive movies and television shows cost as much as they always did. But that's where it ends. Creative people in Los Angeles now talk longingly of "the old days," back when you could waltz into someone's office, pitch a half-baked idea and walk out with a check. No longer.

In the NBA, the owners are headed for a similar, "Wait a second, were we doing this the right away?" realization, if it hasn't happened already. The current system doesn't fly. The salary cap and luxury threshold ebb and flow with yearly revenue -- so if revenue drops, teams have less to spend -- only there's no ebb and flow with the salaries. When the revenue dips like it did these past two seasons, the owners are screwed.

They arrived at this specific point after salaries ballooned over the past 15 years -- not for superstars, but for complementary players who don't sell tickets, can't carry a franchise, and, in a worst-case scenario, operate as a sunk cost. These players get overpaid for one reason: Most teams throw money around like drunken sailors at a strip joint. When David Stern says, "We're losing $400 million this season," he really means, "We stupidly kept overpaying guys who weren't worth it, and then the economy turned, and now we're screwed."

This isn't about improving the revenue split between players and owners. It's about Andre Iguodala, Emeka Okafor, Elton Brand, Andrei Kirilenko, Tyson Chandler, Larry Hughes, Michael Redd, Corey Maggette and Luol Deng making eight figures a year but being unable to sell tickets, create local buzz or lead a team to anything better than 35 wins.

It's about Jermaine O'Neal making more money this season than Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook, James Harden, Serge Ibaka, Eric Maynor, Thabo Sefolosha and Jeff Green combined.

It's about Rasheed Wallace -- a guy who quit on his team last season, then showed up for this one with 34Cs and love handles -- roping the Celtics into a $20 million, three-year deal that will cost Boston twice that money in luxury tax penalties.

[+] EnlargeTracy McGrady
Noah Graham/NBAE/Getty ImagesA sign of the times: Tracy McGrady and his $22.4 million salary rotted away in Houston.

It's about Tracy McGrady making $22.4 million, being unhappy coming off the bench, then convincing his team to let him disappear until it traded him.

It's about Gilbert Arenas hogging one-third of Washington's salary cap next season even though he brought guns into the Wizards locker room and had to plead no contest to a felony.

It's about Joe Dumars dumping Chauncey Billups and Arron Afflalo (combined cost: $13.2 million this season) so he could give Rip Hamilton, Charlie Villanueva and Ben Gordon $143 million combined.

It's about Jamaal Tinsley getting paid $10.6 million this season and the next by Indiana not to play there.

It's about Brian Cardinal, Darko Milicic, Bobby Simmons, Eddy Curry, Kenny Thomas, T.J. Ford, Mark Blount, Etan Thomas, Andres Nocioni, Tony Battie, Adam Morrison, Marcus Banks, Marko Jaric, Matt Carroll, Jerome James, Mike James, Jason Kapono, DeSagana Diop and Dan Gadzuric making more than $120 million combined this season to dole out high-fives.

And the owners are blaming the players? Really? Just in the past three years, we've seen general managers Sam Presti (Zombie Sonics), Daryl Morey (Rockets) and John Hammond (Bucks) build competitive teams by prudently watching their cap, searching for bargains, building around young talent and picks, and/or carving out enough cap space to take advantage of desperate suitors who will pay with draft picks or young players just to dump an unsavory contract. There's a method to their madness. They are the minority, not the majority. Most of their competitors sabotaged themselves and inadvertently reduced the value of franchises as a whole.

For instance, when I was in Dallas for All-Star Weekend, I asked an extremely wealthy person the following question: "Why haven't you bought an NBA team yet?"

His answer: "Because they're still overvalued. Anyone who buys in right now is doing it for ego only. That's why the league grabbed the Russian's [Mikhail Prokhorov's] money [for the New Jersey Nets] so quickly. He has a big ego and deep pockets, and he didn't know any better. He just wanted in. The pool of American buyers who fit that mold has dwindled. Look at [Oracle CEO] Larry Ellison. Five years ago, he would have jumped on the Warriors like Cuban jumped on the Mavericks. Now he's being much more cautious. He doesn't think they're worth more than $325 [million] and they aren't. Not with the current revenue system, not without a new arena, and not with a lockout coming. It's a dumb investment."

This is how the NBA's situation differs from Hollywood three years ago. Hollywood stumbled by accident into the realization that things were broken. But the NBA already knows. The league wants a system more beneficial to owners that features a hard salary cap, no long-term deals (only three or four years guaranteed at most) and no luxury tax. The players will dig their feet in and fight. We will have a lockout or a strike. It will last for months. And months. And months. Start preparing yourself mentally now. It's going to happen.

And really, I would be fine with this. I would.

Just one problem ...

Let's say the owners get their way and the new system is better than the old one. Great. Awesome. Answer these questions for me:

1. Why should I care?

2. Why should you care?

3. Why should either of us care that owners might not lose as much money in 2013 as they did in 2010?

Does it mean ticket prices will drop? I doubt it.

Does it mean franchises with older arenas aren't in danger of having their team hijacked like the Sonics were stolen from Seattle? I doubt it.

Does it mean failing teams won't continue to tank down the stretch for lottery picks, or dump some of their best players to contenders for 40 cents on the dollar to save a few bucks? I doubt it.

So I ask you again ... why should we care?

For instance, let's say you root for the Wizards like my buddy House. Over the last two years, House watched his team overpay Arenas ($111 million; nobody else could have offered more than $85 million at the time) and Antawn Jamison (a $41 million extension for someone about to reach his mid-30s) in a bizarre attempt to keep together the nucleus of a noncontender. Those contracts forced the Wiz to package the No. 5 pick in the 2009 draft, along with a couple of lousy contracts, for immediate help (Randy Foye and Mike Miller). When that move backfired and Arenas went child actor on us, the team called an audible and dealt three of its four best players (Jamison, Caron Butler and Brendan Haywood) for expiring contracts and the No. 30 pick in the 2010 draft.

Three unintentionally funny outcomes here. First, Wizards GM Ernie Grunfeld was the one who overpaid everybody, then had to sacrifice Butler and a 2009 lottery pick just to undo his own horrendous mistakes. Basically, he created the same cap space that could have been attained two summers ago, only Washington fans lost a lottery pick in the process. Did he get fired for this? Of course not.

[+] EnlargeLeBron James
AP Photo/Mark DuncanLeBron James wants to join Gilbert Arenas in Washington! OK, probably not.

Second, the Wizards will have a ton of cap space this summer, only this summer's top free agents won't be saying, "Man, I'd love to play on a young team that's built around Gilbert Arenas." So it's a flawed business plan coming out of the gate. The Wizards shouldn't even mention the words "cap space" to their fans again. It's like promising your kids an ice cream at the end of a long drive when you know there's nothing in the fridge.

Third, they actually tried to sell their fans that one benefit of the Jamison trade was dipping the Wizards under the luxury tax threshold. As House hissed afterward, "What the [bleep] do I care if the Wiz aren't paying the tax? How does that affect me? Does that mean they're lowering ticket prices for the rest of the year then?"

Nope. Over the past five years, half the league's franchises crapped on their season-ticket holders at least once with mismanagement, salary dumping and/or tanking for lottery picks. Along with the Wizards, the following fan bases have reached a breaking point with their respective teams: Sixers, Pistons, Pacers, Nets, Knicks, Suns, Clippers, Warriors and Timberwolves. Depending on how the summer of 2010 works out, we could be adding Cavs, Heat, Raptors, Hawks and/or Grizzlies fans to that list. And four other teams have tried to put out a quality product but still hemorrhaged money this season: New Orleans, Milwaukee, Charlotte and San Antonio.

(Yes, I just mentioned 19 of the 30 NBA teams. You counted correctly.)

Some situations are fixable with a better revenue system, so let's concentrate on the "franchises that can't stop crapping on their fans" group (10 teams in all, counting the Knicks). Guess what happens when you get continually crapped on? It kinda makes you not want to support your team anymore. You know, because you have a big pile of crap on your head. Teams don't seem to understand this; apparently, neither does the league.

For instance, I have Clippers season tickets. At last week's deadline, the Clippers dumped Marcus Camby, the league's second-leading rebounder and their best defensive player, for two expiring contracts and $1.5 million in cash. I had tickets last Wednesday to watch Atlanta kick the butts of the suddenly depleted/lousy/rebuilding Clips. Did the price of those tickets change? Of course not. Hey Mr. Billionaire Housing Discriminator Who Owns The Clippers, I'm glad you pocketed that extra $1.5 million. Really, I am. But what did that do for me? Why didn't you use that savings to discount my last two months of tickets? And what about the other "customers" who bought season tickets because you promised a good product and didn't deliver for the 17th time in the last 18 years?

Now, here's where you say, "Simmons, you're an idiot for buying tickets for that septic tank of a franchise in the first place." Great point. I still own Clips tickets for two reasons: I like seeing the other teams, and there's a puncher's chance that someone like LeBron or Wade might be dumb enough to sign here. Stupid, I know. I'm delusional. But I have owned Clips seats for the past six years; in five of them, the season was over in mid-February.

Does the NBA care that I feel like an idiot for continuing to renew these seats? I don't know.

Does the NBA care about all the loyal customers in every failing city who feel like idiots for continuing to renew their seats? I don't know.

Shouldn't I know?

* * *

Here's what we do know ...

Teams survive on TV money, season-ticket revenue and luxury suites. They don't care about the upper decks. They care about getting fat checks in March and April for the following season, then banking that money for a few months and collecting interest on it. They care about getting us to pay for a spring's worth of playoff tickets up front even though our team might survive only eight days in the postseason. And if they stink, they care about only one thing: creating an illusion of regret.

The illusion of regret is crucial. It's the single most important dynamic in the NBA right now. It drives every lottery drawing, every trade deadline and every free-agency period. It drives Knicks fans to make the decision in 2008, "I'm gonna ride this out for another two years JUST IN CASE we get someone good two years from now." It's driving more interest in this particular offseason than any in recent memory; as incredible as this sounds, people are anticipating July more than June.

The illusion of regret is also relatively evil, no different from America's lottery system that preys on the lower class: convincing people to pay for the unlikely chance that something good might happen, then making them feel like idiots when it doesn't. This is how the NBA differs from any other professional sport. In a league with 12-man rosters, in which only five guys can play at once, you're really only as good as your franchise guy. If you don't have one, you're screwed.

That's where the illusion of regret comes in. A noncontender needs to convince its fans every spring, You better lock down another year of your seats, because if you don't, you're gonna miss out when we kick *** and make the playoffs and it's going to be impossible to get good seats and you'll be jealous! Hell, look at me. I want to break up with the Clippers ... but what if they get LeBron and I miss out? I would regret it. Every minute. Every day. Sure, they have about as much of a chance of getting LeBron as I have of becoming the WNBA commissioner. Doesn't matter. I can't miss even the 3 percent chance that it might happen. Which leads me to this moment in April ...

"Here's another check, Mr. Billionaire Housing Discriminator Who Owns The Clippers. I'll keep my fingers crossed for another year. I hate you."

I do it every spring. I have no protection. Neither do any of the other season-ticket holders for any of the other screwed-up franchises. In Cleveland, the Cavs asked for 2010-11 renewals last month under the guise of an "Early Bird Special." Cavs season-ticket holders will have to decide before the 2010 playoffs start, "Am I keeping my tickets next year? Am I rolling the dice that LeBron comes back?" If they keep them, and LeBron doesn't come back, it's going to feel like getting tipped over in a port-o-john. And yes, the Cavs would be doing the tipping.

So why don't fans have protection? As a failing business -- and, really, a league that loses $400 million in a single year has to qualify as "failing" -- doesn't the NBA have an obligation to win customers back? Just this week, Minnesota announced that it was making 2010-11 season tickets available for up to 50 percent off in March. This made news because ... well, teams don't normally do this. But why don't they? Why not take Minnesota's move even further?

Let's say the NBA made the following rule right now:

Any team that misses the playoffs cannot raise ticket prices the following season. Miss two straight playoffs, season-ticket holders get a 5 percent discount for renewals the following season. Miss three straight, it goes to 10 percent. Miss four straight, it jumps to 25 percent. Miss five straight, it jumps to 50 percent.

Seems pretty reasonable, right? Geez, if you miss the playoffs for five straight years, you shouldn't be in the league. The Clippers missed in 2007, 2008 and 2009. Last summer, they brought back coach Mike Dunleavy, who had made history by losing 300-plus games for two different teams (the Clips and the Bucks) and also having a winning percentage under .400 with both. To nobody's surprise, the season fell apart and that squinty con artist stepped down last month. Now the Clippers are playing the illusion of regret to a hilt. We have tons of cap space, we're gonna have a new coach, and we're going after LeBron ... don't quit on us! Doesn't change the fact that Mr. Billionaire Housing Discriminator Who Owns The Clippers sacrificed the 2009-10 season when he didn't have to.

OK, so let's say my discount penalty plan is in motion. Let's say the 2009-10 Clips knew that, if they missed the playoffs a fourth straight year, they would be looking at 25 percent discounts across the board. Is there any way they keep Dunleavy? No. Is there any way they dump Camby at the deadline? No. Financially, it wouldn't make sense.

DAVID STERN PODCAST

A few days before the NBA All-Star Game, NBA commissioner David Stern joined Bill Simmons on the B.S. Report to discuss all things NBA.

• David Stern podcast

This is what kills me about David Stern, a shrewd man who loves the National Basketball Association and has devoted his life to making it better. He pretends that the economics of his sport don't work anymore, only he acts as though there isn't any blood on his hands. I beg to differ. By allowing franchises to antagonize season-ticket holders, and by refusing to put a system in place that protects fans from tanking teams, he's as guilty as anyone. How can a league have such crystal-clear vision with so many different things -- expanding its global presence, building a self-perpetuating Olympic team, dominating the digital market, experimenting with 3-D -- and look the other way every time its fans get kicked in the teeth?

If I were running the NBA, eliminating the illusion of regret would be my biggest initiative. I would give every nonplayoff team the same odds for winning the lottery, just so these teams wouldn't destroy six to eight weeks of a season for paying customers. Then, I would cut the season by four games, guarantee only the top 12 playoff spots, then decide the seventh and eighth seeds in each conference with a double-elimination tournament for every nonplayoff team that I would call the Entertaining As Hell Tournament (see my 2007 column for the gory details). Boom, we just killed the tanking and salary-dumping issues.

Couldn't that work? Has it even been discussed? Wouldn't it generate a ton of interest and extra revenue? Wouldn't you watch? Wouldn't it put a ton of pressure on teams to stop shutting their best guys down or giving away contract-year guys for no real reason? You can't give away Camby! We need him for the Entertaining As Hell Tournament in April! And who knows, maybe a wacky 7-seed would gain momentum and pull off a Round 1 shocker in the playoffs. You never know. It's never a bad thing when those three words are involved.

Since Stern works for the owners, I understand why he blames the economy instead of blaming the reckless franchises who got the league into this $400 million hole. That's his job -- to cover up the sins of his employers. Just know that gate revenues aren't down only because people have less money than three years ago. They're down because fans became tired of the illusion of regret, and also, because our consumption patterns changed. Many of us own nice televisions now. We can watch any game in HD on a 50-inch screen. We can watch one game while watching another on our laptop. If we want, we can watch the fourth quarters of 10-12 NBA games in one night. There's no real impetus to buy NBA season tickets anymore unless: (A) you're rich, and/or (B) you have great seats between the baskets.

When I mentioned this theory to Stern in our recent podcast, he spun it into a positive by pointing out that the league should be praised for finding new ways to reach its fans. True. But let's spin it the other way. Teams depend on season-ticket revenue because it's guaranteed income. With the current setup, I could skip getting season tickets, then use stubhub.com, ebay.com and even team-endorsed ticket sites to cherry-pick choice seats for six or seven big games per season. So if the NBA wants to keep me (or you, or anyone) as a customer, it needs to prevent me from sampling instead of buying. Ask any sales guy for any NBA team -- this is their biggest challenge. They don't want me for seven games. They want me for all of them.

Stern didn't seem to think it was a problem. Which is a problem. He's running a league blessed with a giant TV contract and its biggest talent boon in two decades, only it's about to lose $400 million, and he's acting like everything is out of his hands right now. Huh? Maybe he needs to be more honest with himself. Yeah, the revenue system needs to be fixed. But so do the playoff system, the salary cap, the ticket plans and the customer/team relationship. They're all part of the same problem.

And if the commish doesn't think the NBA is fundamentally screwed up, just look at what happened last week, when the Knicks, Bulls and Clippers all gave away players and/or picks to shave 2010-11 cap space for LeBron, Bosh, Johnson, Stoudemire, Gay, Boozer and Wade. Was it the right thing to do? Sadly, tragically, disgustingly ... yes. The illusion of regret was taken to new heights. Only one fan base can end up with the best player alive. A few others will settle for lesser stars, some will come up empty, and in the case of Knicks fans and Cavaliers fans, there's a chance for genuine damage. Like, "I'm never rooting for those guys again" damage. Just know that the players didn't create this do-or-die scenario; the owners did.

And sure, like with the Hollywood strike, an NBA lockout will end up working in favor of the owners. It will lower operating costs, protect teams from overspending and create a system in which A-listers get rewarded (the LeBrons and Wades) and the working class (the Goodens and Farmars) gets screwed. Costs will drop, franchise values will increase, and the owners will believe all the acrimony was worth it. The ship will have been righted. Or so they will say.

I hope they're right.

I still don't know how it benefits you and me.



http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/100224

pretty cool read

Raph12
02-24-2010, 06:37 PM
Damn that's way too long to read after a long day at uni, can someone just sum it up for me?

Chronz
02-24-2010, 06:49 PM
Damn that's way too long to read after a long day at uni, can someone just sum it up for me?

Owners are morons that need protection from themselves, shorten contract length and I stopped halfway through but he makes some solid points. Basically prep yourself for a year without basketball.

unwantedplayer
02-24-2010, 06:51 PM
Owners are morons that need protection from themselves, shorten contract length and I stopped halfway through but he makes some solid points. Basically prep yourself for a year without basketball.

Couldn't have summed it up better than that myself haha.

ManRam
02-24-2010, 06:56 PM
I love Bill Simmons. I don't think anyone else could have wrote an article about this topic that was that long, and get me to read the whole thing...besides him.

Solid read, as usual.

DerekRE_3
02-24-2010, 06:58 PM
Another thing they can do is stop calling so many damn fouls and let people actually play defense. They reward the offensive player for initiating contact way too much in the NBA.

pd7631
02-24-2010, 06:58 PM
Good article....long, but good

Kakaroach
02-24-2010, 08:21 PM
Another thing they can do is stop calling so many damn fouls and let people actually play defense. They reward the offensive player for initiating contact way too much in the NBA. Agreed, players get to the rim so easy now its ridiculous.

That was a horrendous long read, but well worth it. On this topic, Simmons knows what he is talking about.

Korman12
02-24-2010, 08:37 PM
Fantastic read; hearing all the mistakes the Wizards made in the past year in two paragraphs is insane -- it sucks for so many teams in the league, the horrible situations management and the play of the game that gets them in to.

I'm a Sixers fan, so I feel the same way.

ChiSox219
02-24-2010, 09:03 PM
Other than his playoff ideas, solid read. When did ~4000 words become a "long read"? Blame Twitter I guess.

smith&wesson
02-24-2010, 09:13 PM
i think its always easy to tell another chest player what to do when your not actually sitting at the chest board yourself. = bill simmons.

ChiSox219
02-24-2010, 09:17 PM
i think its always easy to tell another chest player what to do when your not actually sitting at the chest board yourself. = bill simmons.

I agree, that's a problem I have with Simmons. Sometimes he writes as if running an NBA team is so easy. Fact is, he's not always right and after reading his book I was even less convinced of his ability to succeed as a GM.

Big Quett
02-24-2010, 09:19 PM
i think its always easy to tell another chest player what to do when your not actually sitting at the chest board yourself. = bill simmons.

Agreed. That is why i get so annoyed by watching Skip Bayless saying that he could have done better in every sport situation after the fact.

It is real easy to make the decisions at home when you dont have to deal with consequences.

Raph12
02-24-2010, 09:24 PM
Owners are morons that need protection from themselves, shorten contract length and I stopped halfway through but he makes some solid points. Basically prep yourself for a year without basketball.

Well that sucks... But thnx for saving me the trouble lol.

The Jokemaker
02-25-2010, 12:03 AM
I liked the article and he made good points. He's right about the fans getting screwed in all this. This is all about the owners losing money because they screwed up in managing their franchise. Now there will be a lockout and nobody will play. The main thing I gree with is the improvement of relationship of team and fans where they will cut prices if the team sucks. I just enjoy watching basketball and would love to see more Grizzlies games when I'm in the area but tickets are just so ridiculously high even in the upper decks. I don't know how its going to work out but fact is teams have to respect fans more and be a lot smarter when it comes to spending theirs (and in a way ours) money.

soonabooma
02-25-2010, 12:30 AM
Simmons is definitely a douchebag with cheese. I don't really care if he's still sad about Seattle losing their team. Every time I see that guy refer to our team as the Zombie Sonics, I just want to punch him in the mouth. If he only knew how sad and pathetic he sounds when he says that like a bitter little kid, that kind of sour grapes stuff is very weak. I know that's not the topic of the article, but I just had to make it known once again that he's a loser in life who really has no business working in anything having to do with sports. I seriously doubt he got that job becuz he was qualified. My money says a family member got him that job. But that's how it goes I guess. Either way, he's a clown.

Sox Appeal
02-25-2010, 12:59 AM
Simmons is definitely a douchebag with cheese. I don't really care if he's still sad about Seattle losing their team. Every time I see that guy refer to our team as the Zombie Sonics, I just want to punch him in the mouth. If he only knew how sad and pathetic he sounds when he says that like a bitter little kid, that kind of sour grapes stuff is very weak. I know that's not the topic of the article, but I just had to make it known once again that he's a loser in life who really has no business working in anything having to do with sports. I seriously doubt he got that job becuz he was qualified. My money says a family member got him that job. But that's how it goes I guess. Either way, he's a clown.

I love the fact he calls OKC the Zombie Sonics, or "the team that shall not be named". I think it's awesome, one of the main reasons I like Simmons, is because he does things like that.

He got the job at ESPN, because he is qualified. He was on Page 2 for years, became a hit there, and now he's the most read sports columnist in the world. So, he's obviously doing something right.

SteveNash
02-25-2010, 01:04 AM
Damn that's way too long to read after a long day at uni, can someone just sum it up for me?

"Any team that misses the playoffs cannot raise ticket prices the following season. Miss two straight playoffs, season-ticket holders get a 5 percent discount for renewals the following season. Miss three straight, it goes to 10 percent. Miss four straight, it jumps to 25 percent. Miss five straight, it jumps to 50 percent."

Simmons is an idiot.

Lindystud36
02-25-2010, 01:07 AM
Great Article, and even the whole losing 4 season's in a row is harsh, it is good means for change. It should be 5 years at 25 percent, because injuries do occur. Also contracts need to be restructured, make more incentive based contracts for the NBA while raising the base. So I would propose raising the base salary by 200,000$ but if someone way under performs, than they do not have to be paid what their max contract would cost.

Something like Kobe is going to be paid 10 million in base salary. Every game he starts gives him 100,000 and he is alloud to miss x games for injury. During these games he has to average 5 points and 2 rebounds or his team has to have a winning record with him playing.

Something so if you get a player like TMAC or Eddy Curry you do not have to shell out that sort of money

soonabooma
02-25-2010, 01:11 AM
Uhhhh, it's pretty crappy that a professional sports writer does something like that. If he was doing it in a newspaper or something, that would be one thing. But he does it on ESPN. What's done is done. We deserve alot more respect than that. That team is in OKC now and they have a new name. He makes himself look like a fool when he says something like that, becuz it proves that he's still bitter. It's sour grapes to the fullest. A professional is supposed to do their job the right way, not with a bitter attitude about something that happened that they didn't like. I guess on TV they have to approach it that way, and when they're just writers, they're allowed to do what they want, but it's pretty pathetic. I think the guy is a joke, and very rarely does he actually write credible stuff that can be looked at as anything but a bunch of ranting by some goofball that still lives with his parents. He's not popular becuz he's credible, I'll promise you that, he's popular becuz he's so full of crap that people want to read it to see just what kind of junk he's up to. We have a guy here just like that by the name of Jim Traber on the "Sports Animal" radio show. The guy is a weasel. Sorry, but it's true. Oh well....I guess I'll just have to hope and pray that I see him face to face some day. Now that would be FUN. Let's just say that by the time I was through with him, he'd be having nightmares about the THUNDER for the rest of his miserable life.:box:

Fool
02-25-2010, 01:12 AM
tl;dr, plus I hate Bill Simmons. But, judging by the reactions here, I may just have to read it.

Draco
02-25-2010, 01:13 AM
I thought a little more than half of this article was interesting before rambling about non sense... Even the interesting part isn't too enlightening: the NBA has a revenue problem.. yes, yes it does.

I'd stop reading at this sentence...
(Yes, I just mentioned 19 of the 30 NBA teams. You counted correctly.)

His "illusion of regret" theory and new playoff system is ridiculous..
So the Clips (the non-contender) convinced Simmons to buy Clipper season tix because they might sign a FA like Lebron.. actually Simmons doesn't directly put the blame on the Clipper organization like he did the Knick's but it's implied.. and it makes no sense. Did the Clips really try to sell Lebron to their fans? Did the fans actually fall for it and subsequently purchase season tix? Who's really to blame, the fans or the organization? Sorry, but if I buy a bag of chips that's 40% air, I probably just won't buy those chips anymore. I'm certainly not going to crusade against the brand or try to change the way the brand advertises their product.. There's deception in advertisement? Who'd a thunk it.... Why did I read this article.. cuz I had nothing better to do for the last 10 minutes.

Purple&Gold24
02-25-2010, 01:15 AM
Goood article..its gunna suck if theres no basketball for a full year.

ink
02-25-2010, 01:16 AM
I agree, that's a problem I have with Simmons. Sometimes he writes as if running an NBA team is so easy. Fact is, he's not always right and after reading his book I was even less convinced of his ability to succeed as a GM.

The NBA would be improved if the writers covering the league were better calibre than Bill Simmons. He is the King of the Easy Laugh who has little substance.

JNA17
02-25-2010, 01:18 AM
Bill Simmons sucks but he has made a couple of good points, however, i doubt it will happen.

BradyIsTheMan12
02-25-2010, 01:47 AM
Agreed. That is why i get so annoyed by watching Skip Bayless saying that he could have done better in every sport situation after the fact.

It is real easy to make the decisions at home when you dont have to deal with consequences.

Skip Bayless is a moron, a funny one but still a moron.

soonabooma
02-25-2010, 02:05 AM
The NBA would be improved if the writers covering the league were better calibre than Bill Simmons. He is the King of the Easy Laugh who has little substance.

You nailed it man....easy laugh, little substance. That's all this clown is good for. He's not a GOOD sportswriter. Just like so many of those radio hosts are not actually good sports radio hosts, they are there becuz they are clowns, they stir up crap and get a few laughs. This Simmons guy is not top notch. I can laugh at some of the stuff he says, no matter how whack it might be, but I sure as hell don't laugh at a grown man who is still bitter about his favorite NBA team relocating so he refuses to call the team by it's new name, and also a guy who is so ignorant he doesn't even realize that all his ranting and raving about his little team being hijacked is not gonna change a thing. He can be sour grapes until the end of time, it's not gonna help Seattle get another team. Well.......maybe I was lying about what I said up there.......I absolutely DO laugh at this guy, becuz he's a freaking clown. Did you hear that simmons????? You're a freaking clown, and I'm glad you lost your team. They belong here, and they're gonna make alot of great history here in OKC. I'm glad you don't have them anymore, I'm glad you're sad about it, and I'm glad you're too stupid to realize what a moron you look like, becuz it proves my theory about you to be true. Hope you enjoy not having an NBA team, you little jerk.:dance:

Chronz
02-25-2010, 02:31 AM
So then who ARE the good analysts/broadcasters? Youve basically eliminated everyone

Korman12
02-25-2010, 02:42 AM
^^ That's what I'm basically hearing too.

You make it sound like everyone sucks at everyone's job.

Korman12
02-25-2010, 02:45 AM
You nailed it man....easy laugh, little substance. That's all this clown is good for. He's not a GOOD sportswriter. Just like so many of those radio hosts are not actually good sports radio hosts, they are there becuz they are clowns, they stir up crap and get a few laughs. This Simmons guy is not top notch. I can laugh at some of the stuff he says, no matter how whack it might be, but I sure as hell don't laugh at a grown man who is still bitter about his favorite NBA team relocating so he refuses to call the team by it's new name, and also a guy who is so ignorant he doesn't even realize that all his ranting and raving about his little team being hijacked is not gonna change a thing. He can be sour grapes until the end of time, it's not gonna help Seattle get another team. Well.......maybe I was lying about what I said up there.......I absolutely DO laugh at this guy, becuz he's a freaking clown. Did you hear that simmons????? You're a freaking clown, and I'm glad you lost your team. They belong here, and they're gonna make alot of great history here in OKC. I'm glad you don't have them anymore, I'm glad you're sad about it, and I'm glad you're too stupid to realize what a moron you look like, becuz it proves my theory about you to be true. Hope you enjoy not having an NBA team, you little jerk.

He says the phrase Zombie Sonics and you sound like you wanna burn his house down.

Draco
02-25-2010, 02:48 AM
So then who ARE the good analysts/broadcasters? Youve basically eliminated everyone

Local beat writers and local tv analysts (who are also former players) like KC Johnson and Stacy King... Johnson sticks to reporting.. and King (even though he's obviously a bit of a homer) does an excellent job breaking down the plays.

Sadds The Gr8
02-25-2010, 03:00 AM
Thanks for the article...good read. Simmons has some good points, like how the Wizards failed miserably the last couple years. But that playoff tournament idea was pretty weird. A team that is 20-62 doesn't deserve to have a chance to make a playoffs over a team that is 41-41.

ChiSox219
02-25-2010, 03:01 AM
Someone needs to delete soonabooma's posts.

Wilson
02-25-2010, 03:19 AM
You nailed it man....easy laugh, little substance. That's all this clown is good for. He's not a GOOD sportswriter. Just like so many of those radio hosts are not actually good sports radio hosts, they are there becuz they are clowns, they stir up crap and get a few laughs. This Simmons guy is not top notch. I can laugh at some of the stuff he says, no matter how whack it might be, but I sure as hell don't laugh at a grown man who is still bitter about his favorite NBA team relocating so he refuses to call the team by it's new name, and also a guy who is so ignorant he doesn't even realize that all his ranting and raving about his little team being hijacked is not gonna change a thing. He can be sour grapes until the end of time, it's not gonna help Seattle get another team. Well.......maybe I was lying about what I said up there.......I absolutely DO laugh at this guy, becuz he's a freaking clown. Did you hear that simmons????? You're a freaking clown, and I'm glad you lost your team. They belong here, and they're gonna make alot of great history here in OKC. I'm glad you don't have them anymore, I'm glad you're sad about it, and I'm glad you're too stupid to realize what a moron you look like, becuz it proves my theory about you to be true. Hope you enjoy not having an NBA team, you little jerk.:dance:

Bill Simmons is a Celtics fan...and there are a lot of people who are still upset about the Sonics being moved...

_KB24_
02-25-2010, 03:32 AM
Is their honestly a plausibility of their being a lockout? :speechless:

Wilson
02-25-2010, 04:00 AM
Is their honestly a plausibility of their being a lockout? :speechless:

Yes. However after seeing what the NHL's year long work stoppage did to the league, I would hope that the league and the players can get something sorted out quickly. They've still got another full season after this one to get it worked out.

DaBUU
02-25-2010, 11:23 AM
i was with the guy and his ***** fest all the way up until he said he was a Clips season ticket holder.

HoopsDrive
02-25-2010, 12:06 PM
Good article. I agree on most of his points and how the NBA needs to change its current system.

Except the playoffs format. I think that is a strong point in the NBA. The only thing I'd change or agree to a change about the playoff format is the elimination of East/West playoffs and just group them into 1-16 seeds, with the top 16 teams making into the playoffs. I think that would be much fairer to every team that is deserving to go into the playoffs instead of the crap we see in the East make it every year and those good enough in the West that can't get in because the West is so tight.

I don't like his Entertainment As Hell idea and wouln't agree to that at all. 7 game series from the best 16 teams in the league, playoff format is the best way to go imo.

Other than that, I agree with most of his points.

mfb_lt1birdman
02-25-2010, 12:29 PM
I particularly like the thought of penalizing team ownership in the form of lower ticket prices for putting out a non competitive product for many years. This would force a more competetive league from top to bottom. And better competition will always yield better entertainment and more $$.

Expansion is a great thing too, but if clubs are losing money its time to sever ties. A few less teams would drastically raise the talent pool of the league.

Blackjack24
02-25-2010, 12:36 PM
Simmons is usually a good visionary for ideas that could never be implemented in any realistic manner. The miracle fix type of idea. And he's humorous while he writes.

But for anything with a shred of credibility or possibility to be implemented in the future, he's not a good source.

Wilson
02-25-2010, 12:45 PM
I particularly like the thought of penalizing team ownership in the form of lower ticket prices for putting out a non competitive product for many years. This would force a more competetive league from top to bottom. And better competition will always yield better entertainment and more $$.

I liked that at first, but when you think about it it contradicts his point of protecting the owners from themselves. Take the recent history of the Clippers, Sixers and Wizards for example. It's not like there has been no effort to bring in talent.

The Clippers broke the bank for Baron Davis ($12,150,000 this season) and Chris Kaman ($10,400,000), drafted good players in Eric Gordon and Blake Griffin, and tried to sign Corey Maggette and Elton Brand.

The Sixers threw a lot at Andre Iguodala ($12,200,000), Elton Brand ($14,858,471) and Samuel Dalembert ($11,360,000).

The Wizards had Gilbert Arenas ($16,192,080), Antawn Jamison ($11,641,095) and Caron Butler ($9,780,970).

The owners were obviously trying to win, they just weren't succesful in putting the right team together. Now, if they're threatened with lowered season ticket prices, they're likely to throw even more money at big name free agents, which gets them in an even bigger rut, making the team even more unsuccesful. That isn't protecting the owners from themselves.

R.A.J.
02-25-2010, 12:54 PM
Super long, but true! owners created this mess, let them suffer for it for a bit, and aslong as theres stars like Kobe, LB, Melo, and Wade, there's no danger to the NBA.

PS. Screw the Raptors, Collangelo used his GM status to bring his eurpean buddies to North America and giv'em citizenship.

knickerbockerny
02-25-2010, 01:29 PM
One thing I would say is that I like his lottery system and "entertaining as hell" tournament are great ideas. Like he said guarantee the top 12 (top 6 seeds in each conference) and let the other 18 rumble in NCAA tournament style for the last two spots in each conference. This would rule out tanking, because the team with the better record would have home court advantage for each tournament game in each round.

knickerbockerny
02-25-2010, 01:31 PM
I liked that at first, but when you think about it it contradicts his point of protecting the owners from themselves. Take the recent history of the Clippers, Sixers and Wizards for example. It's not like there has been no effort to bring in talent.

The Clippers broke the bank for Baron Davis ($12,150,000 this season) and Chris Kaman ($10,400,000), drafted good players in Eric Gordon and Blake Griffin, and tried to sign Corey Maggette and Elton Brand.

The Sixers threw a lot at Andre Iguodala ($12,200,000), Elton Brand ($14,858,471) and Samuel Dalembert ($11,360,000).

The Wizards had Gilbert Arenas ($16,192,080), Antawn Jamison ($11,641,095) and Caron Butler ($9,780,970).

The owners were obviously trying to win, they just weren't succesful in putting the right team together. Now, if they're threatened with lowered season ticket prices, they're likely to throw even more money at big name free agents, which gets them in an even bigger rut, making the team even more unsuccesful. That isn't protecting the owners from themselves.

The way you fix that quandry is lowering the max amount of years that could be given.

mser58
02-25-2010, 01:39 PM
The NBA is a mess...


start over, pull every player from every team and have a fantasy draft!

jk

Wilson
02-25-2010, 01:46 PM
The way you fix that quandry is lowering the max amount of years that could be given.

But scared owners would still handcuff themselves for three or four years at a time by offering money to the wrong guy.

Plus, let's say a team misses the play-offs a few years running and have to half their ticket prices. Then they make the play-offs one year and bump them right back up - how much unrest will that create amongst the fanbase?

I do agree with any movement towards making this a fan's game again, I just think Simmons' idea about ticket prices will force owners into the same dumb mistakes they're already making, and could increase them.

css\kwallace
02-25-2010, 01:53 PM
who cares nba stinks bunch of guys who can jump and run see that at any park mabye 5 or 6 players in whole league worth watchin game just stinks and it aint even cool any more bring on mlb

css\kwallace
02-25-2010, 01:55 PM
who cares nba stinks bunch of guys who can jump and run see that at any park mabye 5 or 6 players in whole league worth watchin game just stinks and it aint even cool any more bring on mlb

:mad::confused:

Korman12
02-26-2010, 05:46 PM
who cares nba stinks bunch of guys who can jump and run see that at any park mabye 5 or 6 players in whole league worth watchin game just stinks and it aint even cool any more bring on mlb

= I don't like or know anything about basketball. But it's their fault, not mine.

OG "Dee" LOCc
02-26-2010, 06:32 PM
Wow, what a read.

Bill Simons is great, and I agree with just about everything he said.

magichatnumber9
02-26-2010, 07:11 PM
Bill Simmons is a Celtics fan...and there are a lot of people who are still upset about the Sonics being moved...I'm sorry Wilson did I miss something. Bill Simmons is a Celtics fan. Do you plan to elaborate on that? Celtics fans are very respectful especially when visiting other forums. I would like a response.

magichatnumber9
02-26-2010, 07:13 PM
But scared owners would still handcuff themselves for three or four years at a time by offering money to the wrong guy.

Plus, let's say a team misses the play-offs a few years running and have to half their ticket prices. Then they make the play-offs one year and bump them right back up - how much unrest will that create amongst the fanbase?

I do agree with any movement towards making this a fan's game again, I just think Simmons' idea about ticket prices will force owners into the same dumb mistakes they're already making, and could increase them.
I agree Simmons' doesn't have a degree in business and should probably stay out of this ticket thing. Owners should take care of there season ticket holders better.

Wilson
02-27-2010, 02:44 AM
I'm sorry Wilson did I miss something. Bill Simmons is a Celtics fan. Do you plan to elaborate on that? Celtics fans are very respectful especially when visiting other forums. I would like a response.

The guy I quoted seemed to think that Simmons was a Sonics fan who's just bitter about losing the team to Oklahoma. The point I was trying to make was that A) Simmons is not from Seattle or a Sonics fan and B) you don't have to be a Sonics fan to be upset about that team moving.

Sorry for the confusion :o