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View Full Version : Correlation between Doubles and Homeruns



waveycrockett
11-06-2009, 06:04 AM
I was reading an article from Fangraphs and a section of it was based on Robinson Cano (http://www.fangraphs.com/fantasy/index.php/the-good-and-the-bad-of-09-new-york-al). It stated that his ability to hit 48 doubles this season suggests that even at 27 his power is still developing and indicates more Home Runs are to come. I'm probably misunderstanding something somewhere but what is the trend of players who hit for lots of doubles, who then later on translate that into Home Run power?

Driven
11-09-2009, 11:22 PM
Well doubles ARE power, though not HR power. The more extra base hits, the more power. Is there a correlation between 2B and HRs? I have no idea. Brian Roberts is constantly at the top of the list in doubles, but he ain't a HR hitter by any means.

waveycrockett
11-11-2009, 06:18 AM
I'm just curious because I've read that scouts believe younger players that show "doubles power" will translate that into home-run power once that player develops. I was just curious if sabermetricians have debunked this as myth or not. I don't think Brian Roberts would exactly be a fair example. The first time the guy showed real "doubles power" was in 2004 when he he hit 50 yet he was already 26-27 years old, when hitters are at their peak, although the following season he did more than quadruple his HR total and his doubles total went down a bit, so maybe.

Milnertime
11-11-2009, 06:43 AM
I'm just curious because I've read that scouts believe younger players that show "doubles power" will translate that into home-run power once that player develops. I was just curious if sabermetricians have debunked this as myth or not. I don't think Brian Roberts would exactly be a fair example. The first time the guy showed real "doubles power" was in 2004 when he he hit 50 yet he was already 26-27 years old, when hitters are at their peak, although the following season he did more than quadruple his HR total and his doubles total went down a bit, so maybe.
Well Roberts is a bad example, because he was juicing at some point, so it's hard to tell if his power came from development or the increased strength he got from using HGH.

Either way, the whole idea is that as a young guy develops more physical strength he'll be able to hit the ball harder, and thus farther. A good example is Cubs 3B prospect, Josh Vitters. He's been labeled as the kind of guy who will grow into a HR hitter. He is a line drive hitter with good bat speed, but right now he's more of a doubles hitter than a HR hitter just because he's not as strong now as he will be in a few years (He's only 20).


I'd guess there are a plethora of guys who were doubles hitters early on in the minors and grew into their HR power.....Kevin Youkilis fits that mold. The most homers he ever hit in any one season in the minors was 8.