PDA

View Full Version : Yahoo Sports: The 10 best centers of the last decade



AlexTmz2
10-01-2009, 02:49 PM
http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/ball_dont_lie/post/The-10-best-centers-of-the-last-decade;_ylt=AqJfvRAowLPgxEmso4QW7Sm8vLYF?urn=nba,1 93423

10. Alonzo Mourning(notes)
I don't want to denigrate Mourning's passion for the game or will to return to the court, much less his accomplishments on the court while he was healthy. But Mourning also played in less than half of the games he could have from 1999 to 2008 because of illness and injury. Big heart, but bit part.

When he was able to perform, Zo was a defense-focused big who was capable of big shot-blocking nights even when he was playing fewer than 20 minutes a contest. Working on Nets and Heat teams that didn't depend on interior scoring as much, Mourning was allowed to save his energy for the other end and roam, roam, roam.



9. David Robinson

Sure, he only played from 1999 to 2003, but check the numbers.

About 13 points, 8.5 rebounds, two blocks, a steal and a low turnover rate in only 29 minutes a game. The Hall of Famer was a pocket All-Star in his last few years, and wholly deserves a spot on this list despite retiring in 2003.



8. Yao Ming(notes)
He hasn't played more than 57 games since 2004-05, but Yao has shown flashes of being an all-world center when he's healthy.

"When he's healthy." Sigh.

Forget it. The work he's put in is good enough. Scores from either block, from either hand, with several moves. Rebounds, changes shots, makes me tune in. Love watching him play, love watching him get a proper entry pass, and we'll all love it when he walks confidently back onto the court and starts dominating again.



7. Amar'e Stoudemire(notes)
Stoudemire broke into the league the same year as Yao (2002-03), and while he's been pretty injury-prone himself (missing almost all of 2005-06 and good chunks of 2003-04 and 2008-09), you cannot deny the young man's high- and low-post scoring aptitude.

No, he can't guard you, or tell you who Golda Meir is, but Amar'e can shoot, drive either direction, rebound and dominate games. He's sort of a fully realized Shawn Kemp, able to stay on the floor, able to play the pivot.

Now, fully realize it, Amar'e.



6. Zydrunas Ilgauskas(notes)
He gets no extra points for this, but it's worth bringing up.

We thought the man's career was over during the lockout year. We thought it was over in 1999-00, and we thought it was over in 2000-01, when he managed only 24 appearances. The total, between those three seasons? Twenty-nine games, in 214 chances to play.

But Big Z came back, as if nothing had ever happened. Shot the high percentage, turned into the best opening tip-off winner we've ever seen, started tapping in offensive rebound put-backs from all sorts of impossible angles, and holding it down on both ends for a series of either crappy, crafty or championship-worthy Cavalier teams.



5. Jermaine O'Neal(notes)
O'Neal's been bashed plenty, and he deserves a good chunk of it.

Never was a low-post workhorse. Always listed at power forward, despite playing the pivot. Missed heaps of games. Shot a low percentage. Probably made too much money, relative to his production.

You know what he also did? Averaged a double-double for three years, played otherworldly defense, blocked shots, worked his tail off.

No, he hasn't played 80 games since 2000-01, a season that saw "hanging chad" work as a somewhat-funny punch line for the first six weeks. He hasn't shot over 47 percent since becoming a starter, and we're not sure how much he has left. But O'Neal was such a dominant defensive force, moving his feet, that he deserves a bit of reflective praise.



4. Ben Wallace(notes)
Can't drop 25 points in an empty gym, but could probably hold a community college's starting five, by himself, to 25 points in 40 minutes in the same empty gym.

All Ben Wallace did, for years, was guard everyone, and then come up with the rebound. A couple of times a game, he blocked the other team's shot, but most importantly he guarded everyone and then came up with the rebound. Changed shots, chased away guards, helped his teammates, got in people's faces, and then got the rebound.

I don't care if he averages 20 air-balled free throws a season. His mere presence had opposing teams air-balling 20 shots a week.



3. Dwight Howard(notes)

Only on the scene since 2004-05, he's taken a while to come around defensively (despite all the blocks) and offensively (despite all the dunks), and he's a bloody beast.

Forget the mitigating factors. Forget the growing pains. Let's talk about right now, and what he's done right then. Howard has averaged 17.3 points, 12.5 rebounds, 2.9 combined steals/blocks, 57 percent shooting in 36 minutes a game.

Five seasons in, turns 24 in December. Good luck with all ... that.



2. Shaquille O'Neal(notes)
One of the greatest, if not the greatest, pivotmen ever.

That said, he's been injury-prone, he's showed up to camp out of shape, he hasn't really been a dominant force since 2003-04 or so. Sure, he came back to win a ring in Miami in 2005-06, and is still complaining about missing out on the MVP award in 2004-05, but he wasn't even the best player on either of those teams.

That said, O'Neal's 1999-00 turn was one of the greatest seasons of any center to ever play this game, he's still changing games and he's still throwing down. This just wasn't as fine a 10-year turn as the man who comes below this paragraph.



1. Tim Duncan(notes)
The same, old, story.

Duncan won't blow you away. Shaq seems scarier, and the "power forward" designation might throw you, but don't get shook.

Tim guards the low post (guards everything, really), and works from the low post while his "center" teammate (David Robinson, Nazr Mohammad, Fabricio Oberto(notes), Matt Bonner(notes)) works anywhere from the high post (D-Rob, Nazr), the baseline (Fab), or the 3-point line (Red Rocket).

In the meantime, Duncan has destroyed teams defensively, drawn trillions of double teams, scored efficiently and generally acted as what we'd hoped Bill Walton would have turned into.

And he's done it consistently, nearly free from injury (1999-00 and 2008-09 were kind of tough) for years. You can't say that about Shaq.

And injuries aside? I'm sorry, but he's been better. The best. The best center, of the last decade.

Hellcrooner
10-01-2009, 02:54 PM
thats why thy didnt put duncan in pf

its easier to put him before and old shaq than put him ahead of kg, they didnt want to make that decision

tromo9
10-01-2009, 03:07 PM
****kk that shaqs number 1

AlexTmz2
10-01-2009, 03:09 PM
IMO, I would of put Camby on that list. Ben Wallace over Amare, should that be because of the Defense???

BlondeBomber41
10-01-2009, 03:10 PM
thats why thy didnt put duncan in pf

its easier to put him before and old shaq than put him ahead of kg, they didnt want to make that decision

No, its MUCH easier to put him in front of KG than it is to put him in front of Shaq. MUCH MUCH MUCH easier.

AlexTmz2
10-01-2009, 03:13 PM
No, its MUCH easier to put him in front of KG than it is to put him in front of Shaq. MUCH MUCH MUCH easier.

x1

J4KOP99
10-01-2009, 03:17 PM
Shaq deserves to be #1 and it shouldnt even be an argument.

How are they going to put Duncan and David Robinson on the same list when they obviously had to play different positions? Duncan has always been a PF and that is his natural position. They ****ed this one up...put him in front of Garnett for PF's.

JordansBulls
10-01-2009, 03:22 PM
No, its MUCH easier to put him in front of KG than it is to put him in front of Shaq. MUCH MUCH MUCH easier.

How so? Shaq has at least 6 years in his prime in the 1990's. In 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 while Duncan only has 2 years in the 90's. KG has been in his prime the entire 2000's.

ko8e24
10-01-2009, 03:25 PM
what a joke of a list???? Duncan, really?????


Well then, I guess it's been determined that the Mail Man, Karl Malone, is the greatest power forward in NBA HISTORY!

Chronz
10-01-2009, 03:25 PM
Mother of god this is his worst list yet but its not because Duncans #1, how is he not?

ko8e24
10-01-2009, 03:27 PM
How so? Shaq has at least 6 years in his prime in the 1990's. In 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 while Duncan only has 2 years in the 90's. KG has been in his prime the entire 2000's.


:confused:
i would say his last yr in minnesota and his 2 yrs so far in boston have not even been near close to his prime mvp season of 03-04.

SteveNash
10-01-2009, 03:33 PM
Proper List:
10. Brad Miller
9. Vlade Divac
8. David Robinson
7. Dwight Howard
6. Zydrunas Ilgauskas
5. Alonzo Mourning
4. Amar'e
3. Yao
2. Ben Walllace
1. Shaq

mikantsass
10-01-2009, 03:36 PM
:confused:
i would say his last yr in minnesota and his 2 yrs so far in boston have not even been near close to his prime mvp season of 03-04.

Only cuz your a Laker fan do you believe that. KG finished 3rd in MVP voting the year they won the title.

Back on topic, Ilgauskis is wayyyyyy too high. Shaq should no doubt be #1. Duncan needs to be on the PF list.

EaglesJackson10
10-01-2009, 03:39 PM
Shaq is a much better center than Tim Duncan way more dominant plus hes more of a center. He has also won just as many titles.

J4KOP99
10-01-2009, 03:43 PM
How so? Shaq has at least 6 years in his prime in the 1990's. In 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 while Duncan only has 2 years in the 90's. KG has been in his prime the entire 2000's.

Explain to me why Duncan is not on the PF list? Where is the logic in putting Robinson and Duncan on the same position list...one was obviously a Center(Robinson) and one was a PF(Duncan).

AIMelo=KillaDUO
10-01-2009, 03:44 PM
I dont understand how Robinson is lower then Dwight...

Robinson has rings, and MVP's and better stats that howard.. Robinson was the original D12!!

AIMelo=KillaDUO
10-01-2009, 03:44 PM
the dude who writes these is an idiot!

bigsams50
10-01-2009, 04:32 PM
How is zydrunas in ahead of amare?

goku
10-01-2009, 04:48 PM
this list deserve a big :facepalm:

timmy is a pf and still shaq was the most dominate center in the 2000s

big-z over yao :facepalm::facepalm:

d12 3rd on the list:facepalm::facepalm::facepalm:

goku
10-01-2009, 04:49 PM
this list deserve a big :facepalm:

timmy is a pf and still shaq was the most dominate center in the 2000s

big-z over yao :facepalm::facepalm:

d12 3rd on the list:facepalm::facepalm::facepalm:

and where is deke he should be on here if ben is


timmy,amare and jo r pf

Lakerfan In NY
10-01-2009, 04:51 PM
http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/ball_dont_lie/post/The-10-best-centers-of-the-last-decade;_ylt=AqJfvRAowLPgxEmso4QW7Sm8vLYF?urn=nba,1 93423

10. Alonzo Mourning(notes)I don't want to denigrate Mourning's passion for the game or will to return to the court, much less his accomplishments on the court while he was healthy. But Mourning also played in less than half of the games he could have from 1999 to 2008 because of illness and injury. Big heart, but bit part.

When he was able to perform, Zo was a defense-focused big who was capable of big shot-blocking nights even when he was playing fewer than 20 minutes a contest. Working on Nets and Heat teams that didn't depend on interior scoring as much, Mourning was allowed to save his energy for the other end and roam, roam, roam.



9. David Robinson

Sure, he only played from 1999 to 2003, but check the numbers.

About 13 points, 8.5 rebounds, two blocks, a steal and a low turnover rate in only 29 minutes a game. The Hall of Famer was a pocket All-Star in his last few years, and wholly deserves a spot on this list despite retiring in 2003.



8. Yao Ming(notes)
He hasn't played more than 57 games since 2004-05, but Yao has shown flashes of being an all-world center when he's healthy.

"When he's healthy." Sigh.

Forget it. The work he's put in is good enough. Scores from either block, from either hand, with several moves. Rebounds, changes shots, makes me tune in. Love watching him play, love watching him get a proper entry pass, and we'll all love it when he walks confidently back onto the court and starts dominating again.



7. Amar'e Stoudemire(notes)
Stoudemire broke into the league the same year as Yao (2002-03), and while he's been pretty injury-prone himself (missing almost all of 2005-06 and good chunks of 2003-04 and 2008-09), you cannot deny the young man's high- and low-post scoring aptitude.

No, he can't guard you, or tell you who Golda Meir is, but Amar'e can shoot, drive either direction, rebound and dominate games. He's sort of a fully realized Shawn Kemp, able to stay on the floor, able to play the pivot.

Now, fully realize it, Amar'e.



6. Zydrunas Ilgauskas(notes)
He gets no extra points for this, but it's worth bringing up.

We thought the man's career was over during the lockout year. We thought it was over in 1999-00, and we thought it was over in 2000-01, when he managed only 24 appearances. The total, between those three seasons? Twenty-nine games, in 214 chances to play.

But Big Z came back, as if nothing had ever happened. Shot the high percentage, turned into the best opening tip-off winner we've ever seen, started tapping in offensive rebound put-backs from all sorts of impossible angles, and holding it down on both ends for a series of either crappy, crafty or championship-worthy Cavalier teams.



5. Jermaine O'Neal(notes)
O'Neal's been bashed plenty, and he deserves a good chunk of it.

Never was a low-post workhorse. Always listed at power forward, despite playing the pivot. Missed heaps of games. Shot a low percentage. Probably made too much money, relative to his production.

You know what he also did? Averaged a double-double for three years, played otherworldly defense, blocked shots, worked his tail off.

No, he hasn't played 80 games since 2000-01, a season that saw "hanging chad" work as a somewhat-funny punch line for the first six weeks. He hasn't shot over 47 percent since becoming a starter, and we're not sure how much he has left. But O'Neal was such a dominant defensive force, moving his feet, that he deserves a bit of reflective praise.



4. Ben Wallace(notes)
Can't drop 25 points in an empty gym, but could probably hold a community college's starting five, by himself, to 25 points in 40 minutes in the same empty gym.

All Ben Wallace did, for years, was guard everyone, and then come up with the rebound. A couple of times a game, he blocked the other team's shot, but most importantly he guarded everyone and then came up with the rebound. Changed shots, chased away guards, helped his teammates, got in people's faces, and then got the rebound.

I don't care if he averages 20 air-balled free throws a season. His mere presence had opposing teams air-balling 20 shots a week.



3. Dwight Howard(notes)

Only on the scene since 2004-05, he's taken a while to come around defensively (despite all the blocks) and offensively (despite all the dunks), and he's a bloody beast.

Forget the mitigating factors. Forget the growing pains. Let's talk about right now, and what he's done right then. Howard has averaged 17.3 points, 12.5 rebounds, 2.9 combined steals/blocks, 57 percent shooting in 36 minutes a game.

Five seasons in, turns 24 in December. Good luck with all ... that.



2. Shaquille O'Neal(notes)
One of the greatest, if not the greatest, pivotmen ever.

That said, he's been injury-prone, he's showed up to camp out of shape, he hasn't really been a dominant force since 2003-04 or so. Sure, he came back to win a ring in Miami in 2005-06, and is still complaining about missing out on the MVP award in 2004-05, but he wasn't even the best player on either of those teams.

That said, O'Neal's 1999-00 turn was one of the greatest seasons of any center to ever play this game, he's still changing games and he's still throwing down. This just wasn't as fine a 10-year turn as the man who comes below this paragraph.



1. Tim Duncan(notes)
The same, old, story.

Duncan won't blow you away. Shaq seems scarier, and the "power forward" designation might throw you, but don't get shook.

Tim guards the low post (guards everything, really), and works from the low post while his "center" teammate (David Robinson, Nazr Mohammad, Fabricio Oberto(notes), Matt Bonner(notes)) works anywhere from the high post (D-Rob, Nazr), the baseline (Fab), or the 3-point line (Red Rocket).

In the meantime, Duncan has destroyed teams defensively, drawn trillions of double teams, scored efficiently and generally acted as what we'd hoped Bill Walton would have turned into.

And he's done it consistently, nearly free from injury (1999-00 and 2008-09 were kind of tough) for years. You can't say that about Shaq.

And injuries aside? I'm sorry, but he's been better. The best. The best center, of the last decade.

How in gods name is B. Wallace ahead of two player bound for the Hall of famer...1 is in...1 soon to be.

DirkIsTheBest
10-01-2009, 04:53 PM
Where is Erick Dampier ?????????? he is way better than Zydrunas and Yao !

Raph12
10-01-2009, 05:06 PM
x1

I think you mean "x2" or "+1"? Because "x1" would mean that he is on his own with that post.

Lakerfan In NY
10-01-2009, 05:10 PM
How so? Shaq has at least 6 years in his prime in the 1990's. In 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 while Duncan only has 2 years in the 90's. KG has been in his prime the entire 2000's.

You could easily put Duncan ahead of KG. B/c most of the decade he was in sota & in Sota he never got that team anywhere except that one yr (which was his only MVP season I believe) & that one yr they didnt make it to the finals. Duncan, from the day he got into the league help D. Robinson (some may say D. Robinson helped Duncan get a ring,) If you minus the Boston yr…KG legacy was going to be that of a great player that couldn’t win championship. Like Barkley & Malone. Duncan should be #1 PF & Shaq#1 center...Duncan hasn't even played that much center threw the decade...1st it was D. Robinson...than N. Mahummod...Than F. Elson...Not to mention that european center (can't remember his name right now)...I even think Kurt Thomas played center...Duncan at center is a recent event.. Like a yr or two ago that started

TheMicrowave
10-01-2009, 05:13 PM
Tenos.

fairandbalanced
10-01-2009, 05:52 PM
http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/ball_dont_lie/post/The-10-best-centers-of-the-last-decade;_ylt=AqJfvRAowLPgxEmso4QW7Sm8vLYF?urn=nba,1 93423

10. Alonzo Mourning(notes)
I don't want to denigrate Mourning's passion for the game or will to return to the court, much less his accomplishments on the court while he was healthy. But Mourning also played in less than half of the games he could have from 1999 to 2008 because of illness and injury. Big heart, but bit part.

When he was able to perform, Zo was a defense-focused big who was capable of big shot-blocking nights even when he was playing fewer than 20 minutes a contest. Working on Nets and Heat teams that didn't depend on interior scoring as much, Mourning was allowed to save his energy for the other end and roam, roam, roam.



9. David Robinson

Sure, he only played from 1999 to 2003, but check the numbers.

About 13 points, 8.5 rebounds, two blocks, a steal and a low turnover rate in only 29 minutes a game. The Hall of Famer was a pocket All-Star in his last few years, and wholly deserves a spot on this list despite retiring in 2003.



8. Yao Ming(notes)
He hasn't played more than 57 games since 2004-05, but Yao has shown flashes of being an all-world center when he's healthy.

"When he's healthy." Sigh.

Forget it. The work he's put in is good enough. Scores from either block, from either hand, with several moves. Rebounds, changes shots, makes me tune in. Love watching him play, love watching him get a proper entry pass, and we'll all love it when he walks confidently back onto the court and starts dominating again.



7. Amar'e Stoudemire(notes)
Stoudemire broke into the league the same year as Yao (2002-03), and while he's been pretty injury-prone himself (missing almost all of 2005-06 and good chunks of 2003-04 and 2008-09), you cannot deny the young man's high- and low-post scoring aptitude.

No, he can't guard you, or tell you who Golda Meir is, but Amar'e can shoot, drive either direction, rebound and dominate games. He's sort of a fully realized Shawn Kemp, able to stay on the floor, able to play the pivot.

Now, fully realize it, Amar'e.



6. Zydrunas Ilgauskas(notes)
He gets no extra points for this, but it's worth bringing up.

We thought the man's career was over during the lockout year. We thought it was over in 1999-00, and we thought it was over in 2000-01, when he managed only 24 appearances. The total, between those three seasons? Twenty-nine games, in 214 chances to play.

But Big Z came back, as if nothing had ever happened. Shot the high percentage, turned into the best opening tip-off winner we've ever seen, started tapping in offensive rebound put-backs from all sorts of impossible angles, and holding it down on both ends for a series of either crappy, crafty or championship-worthy Cavalier teams.



5. Jermaine O'Neal(notes)
O'Neal's been bashed plenty, and he deserves a good chunk of it.

Never was a low-post workhorse. Always listed at power forward, despite playing the pivot. Missed heaps of games. Shot a low percentage. Probably made too much money, relative to his production.

You know what he also did? Averaged a double-double for three years, played otherworldly defense, blocked shots, worked his tail off.

No, he hasn't played 80 games since 2000-01, a season that saw "hanging chad" work as a somewhat-funny punch line for the first six weeks. He hasn't shot over 47 percent since becoming a starter, and we're not sure how much he has left. But O'Neal was such a dominant defensive force, moving his feet, that he deserves a bit of reflective praise.



4. Ben Wallace(notes)
Can't drop 25 points in an empty gym, but could probably hold a community college's starting five, by himself, to 25 points in 40 minutes in the same empty gym.

All Ben Wallace did, for years, was guard everyone, and then come up with the rebound. A couple of times a game, he blocked the other team's shot, but most importantly he guarded everyone and then came up with the rebound. Changed shots, chased away guards, helped his teammates, got in people's faces, and then got the rebound.

I don't care if he averages 20 air-balled free throws a season. His mere presence had opposing teams air-balling 20 shots a week.



3. Dwight Howard(notes)

Only on the scene since 2004-05, he's taken a while to come around defensively (despite all the blocks) and offensively (despite all the dunks), and he's a bloody beast.

Forget the mitigating factors. Forget the growing pains. Let's talk about right now, and what he's done right then. Howard has averaged 17.3 points, 12.5 rebounds, 2.9 combined steals/blocks, 57 percent shooting in 36 minutes a game.

Five seasons in, turns 24 in December. Good luck with all ... that.



2. Shaquille O'Neal(notes)
One of the greatest, if not the greatest, pivotmen ever.

That said, he's been injury-prone, he's showed up to camp out of shape, he hasn't really been a dominant force since 2003-04 or so. Sure, he came back to win a ring in Miami in 2005-06, and is still complaining about missing out on the MVP award in 2004-05, but he wasn't even the best player on either of those teams.

That said, O'Neal's 1999-00 turn was one of the greatest seasons of any center to ever play this game, he's still changing games and he's still throwing down. This just wasn't as fine a 10-year turn as the man who comes below this paragraph.



1. Tim Duncan(notes)
The same, old, story.

Duncan won't blow you away. Shaq seems scarier, and the "power forward" designation might throw you, but don't get shook.

Tim guards the low post (guards everything, really), and works from the low post while his "center" teammate (David Robinson, Nazr Mohammad, Fabricio Oberto(notes), Matt Bonner(notes)) works anywhere from the high post (D-Rob, Nazr), the baseline (Fab), or the 3-point line (Red Rocket).

In the meantime, Duncan has destroyed teams defensively, drawn trillions of double teams, scored efficiently and generally acted as what we'd hoped Bill Walton would have turned into.

And he's done it consistently, nearly free from injury (1999-00 and 2008-09 were kind of tough) for years. You can't say that about Shaq.

And injuries aside? I'm sorry, but he's been better. The best. The best center, of the last decade.

Worst rankings ever, period. It's not even worth responding too.

MackSnackWrap
10-01-2009, 05:55 PM
Shaq shud be first

Chronz
10-01-2009, 06:50 PM
I dont understand how Robinson is lower then Dwight...

Robinson has rings, and MVP's and better stats that howard.. Robinson was the original D12!!

Not in the 00's, get it?

Toenail Clipper
10-01-2009, 07:09 PM
Where's Andrew Bynum?!
JK

Reversed86Curse
10-01-2009, 07:37 PM
Where's Andrew Bynum?!
JK

I was half expecting some homer to make the Bynum argument.

And Duncan is the best PF of all time, and should be on that list.

I like you
10-01-2009, 07:53 PM
Proper List:
10. Brad Miller
9. Vlade Divac
8. David Robinson
7. Dwight Howard
6. Zydrunas Ilgauskas
5. Alonzo Mourning
4. Amar'e
3. Yao
2. Ben Walllace
1. Shaq

I like you

ko8e24
10-01-2009, 09:46 PM
I was half expecting some homer to make the Bynum argument.

And Duncan is the best PF of all time, and should be on that list.

:drunk:

wut r u talkin bout?

Cavs_Fan24
10-01-2009, 10:01 PM
Howards ranked too high IMO

htownsfavorite
10-01-2009, 10:05 PM
U have got to be kidding me, how is Hakeem Olajuwon not #1 or even mentioned, he played against just about all those guys and dominated them, there will never be another center who could do the things he did, he was like a created player on a video game

Toenail Clipper
10-01-2009, 10:09 PM
U have got to be kidding me, how is Hakeem Olajuwon not #1 or even mentioned, he played against just about all those guys and dominated them, there will never be another center who could do the things he did, he was like a created player on a video game

Cause Hakeem is from the 90's.... ******

ThuglifeJ
10-01-2009, 11:01 PM
come on...

Shaq is the most dominate player of the 2000s. How is he not number one at his position. Tim should be in the PF list, especially since it's so much easier to just put him in front of KG than SHAQ. IT's SHAQ for cryin out loud. Shaq should EASILY be NUMBER 1 ON THE BEST CENTERS LIST OF THE LAST DECADE.

Jeez. IGLAUSKAUS!?!? SEROIUSLY that high?!


This bugs me these orders are messsedd up. How does this guy fail at positions so much. Dwight Howard (I'm a damn Magic fan) is already higher than Ming? And others? Not yet...He might be in the talks for the next decade but not right now...


this is dumb.





this is dumb....

BkOriginalOne
10-01-2009, 11:08 PM
I was actually hoping that Camby would crack the list.
Very underrated player.
Shaq should still be number 1.

j-mart
10-01-2009, 11:10 PM
Umm...I think they forgot about Zan Tabak.

Illuminati999
10-01-2009, 11:55 PM
Worst rankings ever, period. It's not even worth responding too.

Yet you responded anyways. =p