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cheerio
09-28-2009, 05:37 PM
1884 National League Charley Radbourn for the Providence Grays

The Providence Grays finished first with a record of 84-28

Charley was 59-12 with 1 Save 1.38 ERA w. 441 K's

Wow


That is some endurance

Zmaster52
09-28-2009, 05:41 PM
this is a random thread...didnt jake peavy win it on '07?

Kinsm
09-28-2009, 05:47 PM
Very random.

Radbourn started 73 games and completed 73 games that season. The Providence team had only 2 other pitchers that year with more than 32 IP, one had 221 IP the other 71 IP...compared to Radbourn's 678. There were only 8 teams in the NL that year.

Past Winners

http://www.baseball-reference.com/awards/triple_crowns.shtml

Kinsm
09-28-2009, 05:49 PM
1884 National League Charley Radbourn for the Providence Grays

The Providence Grays finished first with a record of 84-28

Charley was 59-12 with 1 Save 2.11 ERA

Wow

He only had 170 K's though

That is some endurance

HE HAD 441 K's and an ERA of 1.38 that year.

Zmaster52
09-28-2009, 05:59 PM
they called him Old House Radbourn or somethin right?

cheerio
09-28-2009, 06:03 PM
HE HAD 441 K's and an ERA of 1.38 that year.

Sorry, typo

reading the wrong line

cheerio
09-28-2009, 06:04 PM
they called him Old House Radbourn or somethin right?

Old Hoss

cheerio
09-28-2009, 06:04 PM
Just amazes me how times have changed

MDfootball36
09-28-2009, 06:37 PM
he wasn't playing against the best players from around the world either

Kinsm
09-28-2009, 08:01 PM
he wasn't playing against the best players from around the world either

He could have been pitching to eskimos, wouldn't have mattered....the fact that his arm didn't fall off was amazing enough.

bagwell368
09-28-2009, 08:07 PM
1884 National League Charley Radbourn for the Providence Grays

The Providence Grays finished first with a record of 84-28

Charley was 59-12 with 1 Save 1.38 ERA w. 441 K's

Wow


That is some endurance

There are IMO 4 distinct eras for pitchers. This year is from the #1 era. Did you know that pitchers threw from 50' until 1894? Did you also know that the top 116 IP thrown in a season happened during this era (455.1 - 680). Comparing these guys to the 3 following era's is a joke.

The period of 1894-1901 has the normal pitching distance, but baseball was still in its infancy - call it a transition.

1901-1920 is the peak of the dead ball era (BTW, none of the aces of the teens matched their stats in the 20's, that should tell you something)

1921 - 1983 is the third era

1983 - 1988 is the transition phase (DH in AL, modern bullpen/closer starts)

1988 - now is the 4th

Comparing between era's is almost always makes the later ones look worse. I can promise you Sandy Koufax for instance would be nowhere near as dominant in the AL in 2000 as he was in the NL in 1963 (higher mound, huge strike zone (the letters were actually a strike), huge pitcher friendly park, most teams built to push across one run). Pedro's 2000 dwarfs what Koufax did given the context.

Pedro Martinez, Randy, Clemens would have had sub 0.30 ERA's in Radbourn's time, bank on it. Betcha Lefty Grove, Bob Gibson, and other aces from the 3rd era would have performed about the same in 1884. Meanwhile Radbourn having probably never hit 90 MPH once in his life would probably not even make a Division 1 college team today. I know - my son's a lefty that has ace control and can throw six different pitches for strikes, but he need to crack 87 (he's at 84 now) by April to have a shot at D1, otherwise its D2 where he can play in the field and pitch.

bagwell368
09-28-2009, 08:47 PM
Era 2:


1913 Walter Johnson 36-7; 1.14 ERA (259 ERA+); 243 K's 346 IP's; RAA 92

Era 3:



1966 Sandy Koufax 27-9; 1.73 (190 ERA+); 317 K's 323 IP; RAA 63; VORP 99.7

1968 Bob Gibson 22-9; 1.12 (258 ERA+); 268 K's 304.2 IP's (got terrible run support); RAA 74; VORP 85.4

Era 4:


2000 Pedro Martinez 18-6; 1.74 ERA (291 ERA+); 313 K's 217 IP; RAA 76; VORP 116.7