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View Full Version : Do Allstar Big Men Need to shoot 50%+ for their teams to succeed?



JordansBulls
08-07-2009, 02:53 PM
Do Allstar Big Men Need to shoot 50%+ for their teams to succeed?

Here is a list of guys who are allstar/superstars in the league and what they have shot from the field their career and how often they shoot 50% or better.


Bosh shoots 49% FG, has shot 51%, ~50%, ~49% and 49% in his career
Amare shoots 54% FG, shot over 50% 4x out of 6 full years.
Gasol shoots 52% FG, has shot over 50% every year except 1
Dirk shoots 47% FG only shot 50% one time in 2006-2007
Garnett shoots 50% FG and has shot over 50% 4 times and shot 50% two other times
Duncan shoots 51% FG and has shot over 50% 6 times and shot 50% 4 times.
Boozer shoots 54% FG and has shot over 50% every year except last season where he shot 49% FG.
David West shoots 48% FG and has only shot 50% FG once in his 6 years.


Obviously guys like Shaq and Dwight will shoot better because they mainly get shots off of dunks.

tland22
08-07-2009, 03:28 PM
West is a jump shooter...so 48% is OUTSTANDING. Same with Dirk.

But to answer yoyur question.... Im not exactly sure. Every big man needs a team around him. Thats a more important factor really. not how well the big man shoots. Cuz a big man might not be the best FG% but might get to the free throw line a TON and that makes up for shooting lower %

cowboyz180
08-07-2009, 06:11 PM
well, if they are jump shooters, 50% is pretty high. i would say in the high 40s

TheMicrowave
08-07-2009, 06:16 PM
No I don't think so.

Basketball is a team sport, one player's shooting percentage is not going to make or break success.

Are you trying to say Chris Bosh shooting 51% from the field would make the Raptors a lot more successful rather than 48%? I don't think so. It is a team sport.

sp1derm00
08-07-2009, 06:37 PM
I don't think percentages matter as much as everyone makes it out to be. The difference between a 48% scorer and a 50% scorer is maybe 1 or 2 more bad games, or 1 or 2 more extremely good games. It's not a huge deal.

Dirk might shoot only 47%, but he actually shoots 3's whereas the others listed rarely, if ever, shoot 3's. His percentages are down because of this.

Same thing with Lebron. Lebron would easily shoot over 50%, but he takes something like 2 or 3 3-pointers a game, and that brings his percentages down.

theuuord
08-07-2009, 06:55 PM
depends if they're shooting twos or threes, and how good they are from the line.

that's why true shooting percentage is so much better than everything else.

theuuord
08-07-2009, 06:59 PM
I don't think percentages matter as much as everyone makes it out to be. The difference between a 48% scorer and a 50% scorer is maybe 1 or 2 more bad games, or 1 or 2 more extremely good games. It's not a huge deal.

Dirk might shoot only 47%, but he actually shoots 3's whereas the others listed rarely, if ever, shoot 3's. His percentages are down because of this.

Same thing with Lebron. Lebron would easily shoot over 50%, but he takes something like 2 or 3 3-pointers a game, and that brings his percentages down.

If we're talking about first options, the average first option took about 1300 shots on the season. The difference between 48% and 50% is 26 shots, or at the very least, 52 points (likely more depending on the type of shot, the free throws involved, etc.)

52 points doesn't sound like a lot, but as far as marginal points go that can swing a good solid 4 or 5 games. and in this league every win counts. you'd be surprised at how little percentages can make big differences.

tland22
08-07-2009, 07:12 PM
^^^^ hell yea to what you said.

How do you find out "true" shooting % ?

Hustla23
08-07-2009, 07:32 PM
Yes 50% should be the minimum for a #1 option big man on a team.

Anything less is hazardous to the success of a team.

Paulliwali
08-07-2009, 07:52 PM
um..what does yao shoot at?

Toenail Clipper
08-07-2009, 08:04 PM
NOOOOOOOOO
Not really, they can shoot at 0 percent and still be beast

Brooklyn Mets
08-07-2009, 08:06 PM
its good because it means that theyre getting good looks at the basket and theyre probably cleaning up on the boards and getting good second chance opportunities.. being an efficient low post player is key for having sucess in the league..

theuuord
08-07-2009, 09:04 PM
^^^^ hell yea to what you said.

How do you find out "true" shooting % ?

it's on any reputable basketball statistic site, like basketball-reference. the formula is pts/(fga+(.44*fta)), the .44 being the multiplier for free throws (2 free throws historically has been equal to about .88 possessions - it's not exactly 1 because of three point plays and the rare four point plays).

it's a lot more telling than raw fg%, which suffers from not distinguishing types of shots (thus undervaluing guys like ray allen and jr smith) and not adding in free throws (thus undervaluing guys like devin harris).

Raps08-09 Champ
08-07-2009, 09:08 PM
I don' think so.

But as long as it is around 47% or higher.

bagwell368
08-07-2009, 09:15 PM
incomplete question.

would you rather have a center that shoots 45% from the floor and 77.5% from the line

OR

shoots 55% from the floor and 60% from the line?

I'll take the 45 and 77.5 from the line - the other player will invite a wave of fouls at the end of any close game.

Even better to have McHale having his 60.4/83.6 season

Raps08-09 Champ
08-07-2009, 09:17 PM
incomplete question.

would you rather have a center that shoots 45% from the floor and 77.5% from the line

OR

shoots 55% from the floor and 60% from the line?

I'll take the 45 and 77.5 from the line - the other player will invite a wave of fouls at the end of any close game.

Even better to have McHale having his 60.4/83.6 season

Yao Ming's 55 and 87 is pretty good too.

theuuord
08-07-2009, 09:58 PM
incomplete question.

would you rather have a center that shoots 45% from the floor and 77.5% from the line

OR

shoots 55% from the floor and 60% from the line?

I'll take the 45 and 77.5 from the line - the other player will invite a wave of fouls at the end of any close game.

Even better to have McHale having his 60.4/83.6 season

Depends on how many of each shot, but for big men, you would almost always want to take the first guy.

For example.
If all of the floor shots are 2-pointers and each shot, say, 1000 field goals and 200 free throws, the second guy would make 550 two point shots and 120 free throws. That's 1220 points. The first guy would make 450 two point shots and 155 free throws - that's only 1055 points, or 165 points less with the same number of chances.

All other things equal, I think anyone would take the second guy, easily - the difference between 100 field goals over the course of the season is massive, and more than offsets the difference between 35 free throws.

To explain how MASSIVE the difference between 45% and 55% from the floor is, if they each shot 1000 field goals over the course of the season they'd have to each shoot over 1100 free throws to offset the difference between the field goal percentages.
Dwight Howard led the league in free throw attempts this year, with 849, and no one else was even close to that.

IndyRealist
08-07-2009, 10:45 PM
Depends on how many of each shot, but for big men, you would almost always want to take the first guy.

For example.
If all of the floor shots are 2-pointers and each shot, say, 1000 field goals and 200 free throws, the second guy would make 550 two point shots and 120 free throws. That's 1220 points. The first guy would make 450 two point shots and 155 free throws - that's only 1055 points, or 165 points less with the same number of chances.

All other things equal, I think anyone would take the second guy, easily - the difference between 100 field goals over the course of the season is massive, and more than offsets the difference between 35 free throws.

To explain how MASSIVE the difference between 45% and 55% from the floor is, if they each shot 1000 field goals over the course of the season they'd have to each shoot over 1100 free throws to offset the difference between the field goal percentages.
Dwight Howard led the league in free throw attempts this year, with 849, and no one else was even close to that.

Great analysis.

But to the original question, it does not necessarily have to do with all-star big men, but rather the low post player on the team. Sometimes it's the C, sometimes it's the PF. Some teams don't have a real post player at all (like the Mavs). Some players like Lebron and MJ can effectively give you the same results as a good post player if they can shoot a high percentage.

It's a combination of having a potent post player that makes defense have to collapse and shift the defense, creating openings for other players while also being able to get high percentage shots without having to spend a lot of energy and effort.