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View Full Version : Rosen: What to expect from young stars in 2009-10



Draco
08-04-2009, 11:00 PM
http://msn.foxsports.com/nba/story/9889914/What-to-expect-from-young-stars-in-2009-10

List of 25 and under players featured in the article:
Kevin Durant, Derrick Rose, Al Jefferson, Andre Iguodala, Brandon Roy, Andrew Bynum, LeBron James, Dwight Howard, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, Chris Bosh, Deron Williams

Excerpt...

Kevin Durant (almost 21 years old, two seasons in NBA): Every aspect of his field-goal shooting showed marked improvement from his rookie season to his sophomore season — as did his rebounding totals. However, his individual defense is still inferior, and this is where he needs to exhibit the most improvement. After all, if he scores 25 points and the man he's guarding gets, say, 20, then Durant's total impact on the game is minimal. Moreover, with opponents continually attacking him, Durant will habitually be in foul trouble, which will limit his court time and limit his point production. A lack of physical strength is his biggest problem on defense, and it will be interesting to see how much offseason time he's spent in the weight room.

Another category that requires improvement is Durant's negative assist-turnover ratio, but this is mostly a function of his poor court vision. His normal maturation process should greatly reduce the number of times Durant tries to force his dribble through hostile crowds — as well as his errant passwork. Also, as his team improves, Durant won't feel compelled to take as many quick shots as he has in the past.

Right now, there's no question that Durant is an excellent shooter. But to become a legitimate NBA icon, his defense, handling, passing and decision-making will have to make quantum leaps.

Derrick Rose (20 years old, one season): Young Rose has all of the qualities to become a bona-fide superstar. He has the quickness, the speed, the abilities to both drive-and-dish and drive-and-finish, plus the willingness to pass and defend. Even as a mere rookie, Rose also illustrated his courage by being unafraid to take big shots.

What he needs to demonstrate this year is a vast improvement in his 3-point shooting and better reactions on defense. The former is somewhat tricky because of his low release, but the latter should come with experience. Also, Rose must (and will) learn to read defenses in order to avoid over-penetrating — which leads to turnover passes and too many forced shots under heavy pressure.

The Hall of Fame is the limit for Rose. It's all up to him.

Brandon Roy (25 years old, three seasons): Virtually everything about Roy's game is commendable. Of course, his defense could be a tad better, but that's true of just about every player in the league.

Other than that, starting this season, Roy must avoid settling for jumpers and become more intent on attacking the hoop. Indeed, he only averaged 6.47 free throws per game last season — good enough to lead his team, but not good enough to be a reliable scorer in the endgame.


Andrew Bynum (21 years old, four seasons): This young man must show improvement in several physical categories — like staying healthy and developing better footwork on both ends of the court. Even so, his biggest problem is his attitude.

Like so many other young hot-shots, Bynum believes all of the butt-kissers who constantly tell him that he's already a great player who deserves to be playing 35-plus minutes per game and, after Kobe, being the secondary option in the offense. Besides his L.A. buddies, the chorus prematurely celebrating Bynum's game also includes many of the local media.

The truth, however, is that Bynum is still a work-in-progress. He continues being befuddled on defense, and he's convinced that he should be getting many more scoring opportunities than he does. In fact, rather than accepting his role as a defender and rebounder, Bynum thinks that he is primarily a scorer.

Because of all of these factors, Bynum doesn't work as hard as he should and is becoming a perpetual malcontent.

What he absolutely must do this season is to simply buckle down and get busy learning how to play in the NBA. It's now or never for Bynum. If he fails to figure out what's what, he could quite possibly wind up being a career underachiever — a Benoit Benjamin with better hands.

Here's some quick takes on several already elite young players. How might they continue to separate themselves from their peers?

Dwight Howard (23 years old, five seasons): The young man needs to develop some kind of face-up or turnaround jumper. Otherwise, smart help defenders can too often anticipate exactly where his shot will come from. Howard also must become more comfortable passing out of double teams. It's also imperative that he expands his court vision on defense.

Will Howard be satisfied just leading the Magic to the Finals? Or has he understood that the Lakers exposed his various weaknesses and has therefore spent his summer trying to rectify these flaws?

Carmelo Anthony (25 years old, six seasons): In the Lakers series, Anthony played outstanding defense, even against Kobe. Hopefully, that experience taught him the importance of continuing to fully exert himself at the uphill end of the court.

In the past (and even against the Lakers), Anthony has also demonstrated an unfortunate penchant for disappearing for long stretches in critical ball games.

So then, as the new season rapidly approaches, 'Melo must be ready to sharpen his focus and become a full-time All-Star.

Chris Bosh (25 years old, six seasons): This guy must stop acting like there's already a niche reserved for him in the Hall of Fame and become much more aggressive near the hoop — on offense as well as defense.

Toenail Clipper
08-04-2009, 11:06 PM
Blake Griffin = Dominant post player aside from Shaq and Howard in the future

clutchski
08-04-2009, 11:07 PM
That's an extremely general statement made about CB4, although I tend to agree.

Durant is hype
08-04-2009, 11:22 PM
Brandon Roy is a MVP candidate.

Hellcrooner
08-04-2009, 11:28 PM
^unless portland gets eed 1 no he is not

Hellcrooner
08-04-2009, 11:34 PM
Funny in a thread that go closed aout overatings i had wrote something but couldnt make it before they closed it and i was taking byum was overated ( and im a TRUE lakers fan since mid 80s) and i was compring him to benoit benjamin.

Scary because it means.

1 that i am right in suspecting he is like benoit

2 because it will hurt my team in the long run,

3 because it means im an old *** getting older if i can remember everything about benjamins story and way of playing and phisics..

JordansBulls
08-04-2009, 11:35 PM
Derrick Rose is a Hall of Famer?

Me gusta eso idea.

still1ballin
08-04-2009, 11:37 PM
Derrick Rose is a Hall of Famer?

Me gusta eso idea.

no, eso es mierda

Jays Claw
08-04-2009, 11:41 PM
Chris Bosh really needs to step up this upcoming season if he is going to get a max contract in 2010.

madiaz3
08-04-2009, 11:44 PM
Why'd you cut out Lebron James in your quote??

Hellcrooner
08-04-2009, 11:57 PM
Ni me gusta ni es una mierda, es demasiado PRONTO, puede ser el siguiente Boby Hurley

Hellcrooner
08-05-2009, 12:05 AM
Hey Jordan Bulls since you are Old enough to remember too do you see the resembalnce of Bynum and Benjamin?

cowboyz180
08-05-2009, 12:05 AM
cool

tland22
08-05-2009, 12:11 AM
this guy is NOTORIOUS for being a hater. FUHCK everything he says. Seriously, he has never had any credibility with me, or most hardcore NBA fans.

He writes for the casual NBA fan...but his crap doesnt fly with me.

Draco
08-05-2009, 12:28 AM
Why'd you cut out Lebron James in your quote??

I didn't want to quote the entire article and I figured most fans know about LBJ. The players I chose to quote are also ones that often written about in the NBA forum.

secterm
08-05-2009, 12:29 AM
That's an extremely general statement made about CB4, although I tend to agree.

I agree as well

what54!?
08-05-2009, 12:32 AM
he's on point with all of these

JayW_1023
08-05-2009, 11:55 AM
^^^

I agree. I think Rosen is usually pretty accurate in his assessments. Sometimes he takes it too far, but ingeneral he is right most of the time.

The people who think he is hating are just insulted that someone legitimately pointed out flaws in their favorite player and fail to bring an intelligent counterargument.

bigsams50
08-05-2009, 12:02 PM
and the bynum fans will discredit everyting he said about him

tland22
08-05-2009, 02:02 PM
^^^

I agree. I think Rosen is usually pretty accurate in his assessments. Sometimes he takes it too far, but ingeneral he is right most of the time.

The people who think he is hating are just insulted that someone legitimately pointed out flaws in their favorite player and fail to bring an intelligent counterargument.

Not neccessarily. Or they just cant be bothered with explaining everything(their point) then having hard headed people refute it in an idiodic manner, then it just goes back and forth, hopelessly. Some people just cant be bothered with it.

It is silly, every player has flaws. His journalism is filled with negative over tones, which appeals to the casual fan (Manship School of Journalism 101 they teach you this). It is a strategy he pruposely uses to attract the casual fan to read this and that. The "hardcore" fans (for lack of a better word) dont USUALLY want to hear or read things with negative overtones, which this guy ONLY uses in his style of writing. he cant write well, so he uses this strategy to get a rise out of people and people read this crap. But real journalist dont take this stuff seriously. Believe that. Not when this is the only type of material he writes about.

Gibby23
08-05-2009, 02:11 PM
and the bynum fans will discredit everyting he said about him

Why would we. You see the names on the list? It is great that Rosen thinks Bynum can be good, and put him on a list of players that are great or on the way to being great.

JayW_1023
08-05-2009, 02:22 PM
Not neccessarily. Or they just cant be bothered with explaining everything(their point) then having hard headed people refute it in an idiodic manner, then it just goes back and forth, hopelessly. Some people just cant be bothered with it.

It is silly, every player has flaws. His journalism is filled with negative over tones, which appeals to the casual fan (Manship School of Journalism 101 they teach you this). It is a strategy he pruposely uses to attract the casual fan to read this and that. The "hardcore" fans (for lack of a better word) dont USUALLY want to hear or read things with negative overtones, which this guy ONLY uses in his style of writing. he cant write well, so he uses this strategy to get a rise out of people and people read this crap. But real journalist dont take this stuff seriously. Believe that. Not when this is the only type of material he writes about.

I study journalism so you don't have to explain all that to me. I'm not bothered by Rosens articles. He is an analyst and what he writes is entirely subjective. I just respect the fact that he doesn't sugarcoat anything like many mainstream writers do...and buys into the hype. Rosen is a guy who simply watches the game as it happens and draws his own conclusions, without being carried away by statistics, all-star appearances or highlight film.

It's not his job to please the people who read his articles, it's his job to state his opinion. Wether you agree or disagree, the guy always brings an intelligent and elaborate view to basketball. It may not be consistent with the opinions of people who read it, but it's his way of writing. Just like Hollinger is notorious for explaining things through the numbers, Rosen analyzes basketball in a more traditionalist way. The only reason why people critisize his writing because he has a critical view about basketball and doesn't always shower players, teams or coaches with praise by acknowledging certain flaws.

What I find worse is writers who shamelessly bias one team or player (like Andande does with LA and Kobe) and constantly spoonfeed what every casual fan would like to hear anyway. The fact that Rosens articles provoke alot of response is a good thing, because that'll generate all the more interesting debates...and that's a nice breath of fresh air as opposed to always hearing about which team Odom will pick or whatever other headline that's gone overkill to the point where people get fed up with it.

Chronz
08-05-2009, 03:05 PM
Funny in a thread that go closed aout overatings i had wrote something but couldnt make it before they closed it and i was taking byum was overated ( and im a TRUE lakers fan since mid 80s) and i was compring him to benoit benjamin.

Scary because it means.

1 that i am right in suspecting he is like benoit

2 because it will hurt my team in the long run,

3 because it means im an old *** getting older if i can remember everything about benjamins story and way of playing and phisics..

I remember that guy, barely though. By the time I went to my first Clippers game he had already been traded, either the season before or the season of. Anyways what are the parallels? Im looking at the stats and hes all over the place. If we take the 80 games Bynum has played in the past 2 years they are better than anything Benoit has done. For some reason he was incredibly turn over prone, and offered next to zilch on the offensive glass.

How are their games similar? Or is their story similar?

tland22
08-05-2009, 03:20 PM
"What I find worse is writers who shamelessly bias one team or player (like Andande does with LA and Kobe) and constantly spoonfeed what every casual fan would like to hear anyway. The fact that Rosens articles provoke alot of response is a good thing, because that'll generate all the more interesting debates...and that's a nice breath of fresh air as opposed to always hearing about which team Odom will pick or whatever other headline that's gone overkill to the point where people get fed up with it. "

I totally agree with this Jay...

at the same time you must understand...people may not hate on him for "getting down" on their favorite players. Many other reasons Im sure people dont like the subject and SCOPE of topics he writes about. And like I said, some people just cant be bothered with explaining why they dont like his articles (for the reasons mentioned above).

Hellcrooner
08-05-2009, 03:22 PM
I remember that guy, barely though. By the time I went to my first Clippers game he had already been traded, either the season before or the season of. Anyways what are the parallels? Im looking at the stats and hes all over the place. If we take the 80 games Bynum has played in the past 2 years they are better than anything Benoit has done. For some reason he was incredibly turn over prone, and offered next to zilch on the offensive glass.

How are their games similar? Or is their story similar?

body tye, lack of work, injury proness, lack of desire for defense and complaining about touches,

MiamiHeat
08-05-2009, 03:24 PM
Durant is only 20 ??!!

:faint:

IBleedPurple
08-05-2009, 03:25 PM
he's on point with all of these

Agreed. Despite the fans of some of these players getting all bent out of shape, his thoughts could be taken as good advice.