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View Full Version : What's the point of the Restricted Area?



superkegger
05-26-2009, 12:48 AM
I get what it does. You have to be outside of it to draw a charge, and all that. But I don't get why it's implemented. The college game doesn't have it, and I don't get why it was instituted. Is it some kind of safety precaution? I don't really get why it was instituted and looked and couldn't find a reason as to why it was instituted.

znick21
05-26-2009, 01:02 AM
umm, reduces the number of offensive fouls so there is more scoring in games and the league is more "entertaining"?

i have no ideaaa dude.

IndyRealist
05-26-2009, 01:37 AM
So players like Kobe, Lebron, and Wade can get to the basket more. That's the ONLY reason it was implemented. The NBA doesn't want you to be able to play defense on exciting dunkers.

nyanks79
05-26-2009, 01:52 AM
So you cant just stand under the basket and take charges. If you watch college teams like duke just stand under the basket and people drive and the just get screwed. its mad dumb. they need a restricted area or driving wouldnt be extremly hard.

Chronz
05-26-2009, 02:27 AM
To minimize the effect of zone defenses and allow slashers to thrive

If it didnt exist, Yao would average 3-4 Blocks a game

superkegger
05-26-2009, 02:43 AM
To minimize the effect of zone defenses and allow slashers to thrive

If it didnt exist, Yao would average 3-4 Blocks a game

Don't they give slashers enough help when they dissallowed hand checking?

madiaz3
05-26-2009, 02:51 AM
Tall guys could just stand right under and in front of the basket with their hands up and draw charges or just block them, knowing the player has to come to them and they are there waiting.

superkegger
05-26-2009, 02:59 AM
doesn't defensive 3 seconds do the same thing?

Chronz
05-26-2009, 03:02 AM
Don't they give slashers enough help when they dissallowed hand checking?
The league does a good job of evening the playing fields depending on where the game is going. Some years defenses have the upper hand and teams replicate those tactics that bog the game down, so the league finds ways to open the game up. Other years offenses are having too much success so Zone defenses came about to get rid of all the 1 on 1 play that was starting to plague the game, but they didnt want to get rid of all the highlight plays, just stress more ball movement.

I like the medium we're at right now, you can play any style of defense you want, but if your not quick about it positioning yourself the offensive player still holds the advantage.

Chronz
05-26-2009, 03:03 AM
doesn't defensive 3 seconds do the same thing?

Yea pretty much, thats really the more influential rule I think, if neither of these rules existed Yao would go down as one of the greatest defenders of all time.

GregOden#1
05-26-2009, 03:06 AM
The league does a good job of evening the playing fields depending on where the game is going.
For entertainment purposes, not for competitive reasons.

Chronz
05-26-2009, 03:23 AM
For entertainment purposes, not for competitive reasons.

Why do you say that?

BarryIsInnocent
05-26-2009, 03:30 AM
The league makes most its money on dunks, its what people pay to see. Duh!@

junion
05-26-2009, 04:25 AM
because when they were young, they felt it wasn't fair when someone would "babysit" their ali-ali-oxen-free area.

MickeyMgl
05-26-2009, 05:00 AM
I get what it does. You have to be outside of it to draw a charge, and all that. But I don't get why it's implemented. The college game doesn't have it, and I don't get why it was instituted. Is it some kind of safety precaution? I don't really get why it was instituted and looked and couldn't find a reason as to why it was instituted.

Even though the college game doesn't draw the circle, the rule exists the same. The rule is supposed to be simply that somebody standing in the cylinder under the basket can not draw a charge. So in the NBA, the circle was drawn a few years ago to help the officials with the call.

Unfortunately, what has resulted is that the circle is being used to determine "charge/block". Again, if you're in the circle, it's not supposed to necessarily mean that the call is "blocking", but merely that it's "not charging". Part of the decline of NBA officiating is the steady disappearance of a good honest "no call".

On the other side, you also see defenders just step in front of an in-flight offensive player, quickly set their feet outside the circle, and as you often note from broadcasters, the focus goes to whether or not the defender was inside the circle instead of whether or not his feet were set before the offensive player took flight.

It's all screwed up.

IndyRealist
05-26-2009, 12:16 PM
Even though the college game doesn't draw the circle, the rule exists the same. The rule is supposed to be simply that somebody standing in the cylinder under the basket can not draw a charge. So in the NBA, the circle was drawn a few years ago to help the officials with the call.

Unfortunately, what has resulted is that the circle is being used to determine "charge/block". Again, if you're in the circle, it's not supposed to necessarily mean that the call is "blocking", but merely that it's "not charging". Part of the decline of NBA officiating is the steady disappearance of a good honest "no call".

On the other side, you also see defenders just step in front of an in-flight offensive player, quickly set their feet outside the circle, and as you often note from broadcasters, the focus goes to whether or not the defender was inside the circle instead of whether or not his feet were set before the offensive player took flight.

It's all screwed up.

The restricted area is ridiculous. if you're feet are set it should be a charge, if they're not it's blocking. If you step in front of an in flight player it's blocking, because you're taking his feet out from under him if he's in the air (he doesn't get an opportunity to land). If you camp in the lane, it's a 3 second violation. The restricted area is meant to open up the basket for slashers, to let wing players like Lebron dominate the game. Any other explanation is redudant with 3 seconds + blocking rules.

kozzer
05-26-2009, 12:31 PM
MickeyMgl is right. The line was put there to help the officials determine whether a given play should be called a charge or not. It wasn't (at least according to my memory) supposed to help the officials call blocking, as if they player is set inside the circle, it should be a NO CALL. It seems like the NBA has forgotten that basketball is a contact sport. If the official isn't sure how a charge/block call should go, then err on the side of not calling anything.

Plus, I wish they would only call charges (or fouls in general) when they actually see a foul take place, not because someone fell down or a "great" player missed a shot they usually make.

Edit: Actually, I'm slow this morning. If a player is set inside the circle, I guess it should be called a block, because you can't just have guys camping under the basket preventing offensive players from driving to the hoop. It's too damned subjective, which is why I'd rather they not call anything if it's not clear which way a charge/block call should go.

Unruly Fan
05-26-2009, 03:08 PM
The restricted area basically prevents the defence from forcing offensive fouls within too far underneath the net. Imagine how boring the NBA would be if there was no more driving or dunking because you have Anderson Varejao-like players underneath the rim flopping everytime a player gets near it.

_Sn1P3r_
05-26-2009, 03:55 PM
Tall guys could just stand right under and in front of the basket with their hands up and draw charges or just block them, knowing the player has to come to them and they are there waiting.

Yeah that's what I think. Someone could just stand under the basket knowing a player is driving and will either get a charge call, or that block. Forces the defense to think more.

JordansBulls
05-26-2009, 04:11 PM
Well I do know that it started in 1998. I have games of the Bulls from 1997 and before and that area wasn't there. In 1998 the restricted area became a dotted area and now it is a half circle.
The whole idea is so that the refs can be consistent with what is a blocking foul and what is a charging foul.

IndyRealist
05-26-2009, 04:40 PM
The restricted area basically prevents the defence from forcing offensive fouls within too far underneath the net. Imagine how boring the NBA would be if there was no more driving or dunking because you have Anderson Varejao-like players underneath the rim flopping everytime a player gets near it.

That -should- be taken care of with the 3 second rule. There was driving and dunking before the restricted area, long before.