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whitesoxfan83
04-23-2009, 12:26 AM
Jeremy Tyler has decided to forgo his senior year of high school and turn pro.

Yes, high school.

This isn’t some sign of the sporting apocalypse or a teenager with an overvalued sense of worth. It’s a daring, trailblazing yet well-thought out move that challenges the bizarre way America develops amateur basketball players.

Tyler is an agile 6-11, 260-pound San Diego native, the nation’s top player in the junior class who already committed to the University of Louisville. He’s as close to a can’t-miss NBA prospect as there is; a tantalizing mix of size, speed and smarts. Scouts project him to be the No. 1 pick in the 2011 draft, when he’s eligible under the NBA’s age requirements.

In the meantime, Jeremy Tyler’s options were to:

1. Spend the next year at his local school, San Diego High, where he faces quadruple teams and isn’t experiencing much development; or

2. Transfer to a basketball factory in some rural outpost back East which has a big-time team but resembles a traditional high school in name only; and then

3. Play college ball for a few months dealing with NCAA limitations on practice time and coaching contact while competing against many of the same guys he has the last few years.

All for free, of course.

Instead Jeremy and his father, James, who owns his own home improvement company and is about to open a family restaurant, surveyed the traditional route, decided it made little sense, and went looking for a new plan. They called retired sneaker executive and hoops deal maker Sonny Vaccaro and plotted a course for Europe.

It isn’t the easy way – hanging out in high school, AAU and college is safer and far less demanding – but it is what they believe will be the best way to prepare for the NBA. It’s exactly what a teenager of comparable talent would do if they were pursuing a career in music, acting, tennis, hockey or even academics.

“It may not be the best way to get to the NBA, but it’s the best way to get ready for the NBA,” Jeremy Tyler told Yahoo! Sports this week. His decision was first reported by the New York Times.

“I know I can do great things with my talent,” Tyler continued. “My goal in life is to get better. Playing with the pro guys will get me a lot better faster. It will help me fulfill my dreams of playing in the NBA.”

Over the next couple of weeks the Tylers said they will hire a financial planner and professional sports agent and pursue early feelers from professional teams in Spain, Italy and Israel. Jeremy Tyler is likely to receive a contract worth at least a few hundred thousands of dollars a year and could sign endorsement contracts worth at least that.

The plan is to live abroad the next two years, with his father and an uncle taking turns staying with him. “He’ll never be alone,” James said.

Tyler will play against the grown men who can challenge a player of his size and potential. Away from the court he’ll be home-schooled, earn a GED and return in two seasons when he’s eligible for the 2011 draft.

By then, Jeremy Tyler figures, he’ll be a much better player and person; having learned from top coaches, enjoyed unlimited practice time and broadened his horizons in a foreign land. He calls it “a dream job” and isn’t the slightest bit nostalgic for homecoming, prom or missing out on college hoops.

And while he’ll earn a great deal of money, he says his chief motivation is to make himself the best prospect possible for the even greater amount waiting in the NBA.

In basketball terms, it’s a no brainer. The only risk is exposure at the hands of superior competition. Tyler could just stay in the States and hide his weaknesses against smaller, less-talented opponents.

“His game will be picked apart [by scouts], but long-term it’s much better for his development as a player,” said one Western Conference general manager, who can’t comment publicly due to NBA rules. “It’s a bold move, but I’ve seen tape and that kid could play in the NBA right now. He’s an incredible talent.”

Jeremy Tyler said he wants his shortcomings exposed so he can work on them in the same European professional leagues that have produced dozens of NBA players.

This June’s draft will bring more, including Brandon Jennings, a guard from Compton, Calif., who skipped his freshman season of college to play in Italy. Despite predictable challenges on and off the court, Jennings is returning as a projected lottery pick. NBA front offices said they value his experience more than that of a college freshman

Then there’s Spain’s 18-year old Ricky Rubio, expected to be the No. 2 pick in June’s draft. He turned pro at age 14 and at 17 was an Olympic starter holding his own against Team USA.

“For a 14-year-old overseas to be able to make money to play the same sport I’m playing, I think it’s only fair to have the same opportunity,” Jeremy Tyler said. “If you have a talent, you should be able to use it. If college is not going to help you at any stage, it’s a little unfair.”

The college is not going to help you part is where Jeremy, who is polished beyond his years, understands the criticism will come from.

He and his father are bracing for an establishment backlash that fails to appreciate their motivation, determination and appreciation of the intrinsic value of education. They think most of it will be designed to protect the billion-dollar business of amateur basketball.

“It’s just the old way of doing things and no one wants to swallow the pill of change,” James Tyler said. “Basketball is an American sport and they want the kids to go through the channels. And I think there is so much money generated in collegiate sports that they don’t want that interrupted.

“It’s a double standard.”

It won’t help the NCAA if top prospects flee to Europe to develop their games rather than add star power to March Madness.

College hoops was rescued from a long talent drain when in 2005 the NBA enacted an age limit that prohibited American players, but not foreigners, from entering the draft until one year after their high school class graduated.

That has led to a push of young stars in college basketball for one year, even if their commitment to being a “student-athlete” is often dubious. To be eligible for a season, a kid needs to earn just two D’s in the fall semester. He can fail, or not even show up for, every other class his freshman year and drop out immediately after the season.

Jeremy Tyler insists he’s on solid academic ground and isn’t going to Europe to avoid school work. The family informed Cardinals coach Rick Pitino about the decision.

“Education will always be there,” Jeremy said. “It doesn’t matter if I get it now or in three years. I can always go back. I’ll always have that to fall back on. I want to have a degree in business management.”

“Give me the day Harvard is going to close and then I’ll reconsider,” said James, who attended Mississippi Valley State but didn’t graduate. “He can always go back to school. It’s all learning. How is living in Europe not a learning experience?”

Sonny Vaccaro, 69, spent four decades as a powerful sneaker executive and basketball middle man, doing everything from signing Michael Jordan to Nike and Kobe Bryant to adidas, to creating what is now known as national grassroots basketball (high level AAU and high school teams).

He has little patience with college basketball, which after years with an inside view, he calls exploitative and dishonest. As a long-time fighter for player rights, he thinks the NBA’s age limit is criminal.

A year ago he helped Jennings and his mother head to Rome and this winter fielded calls from at least a dozen families who considered doing the same.

That included James Tyler, who watched his man-child of a son get little out of high school ball, where his local school has few good players allowing defenses to descend on Jeremy. He contrasted that with the week Jeremy spent last summer at the Amare Stoudemire big man camp, where he was more aggressive and improved almost by the hour.

“He was bored in high school,” James said. “He said that every game. [He’d] just get the rebound and shoot it back in the hole. I said, ‘we’re wasting this guy’s time. He’s not getting the challenge he deserves.’ As a parent, all you want to see is your kid strive to be his best.”

Rather than choose to send his son off to a diploma mill with a killer basketball team back East – for some reason perfectly acceptable by the establishment – he and his son looked to Europe.

Jennings opened the door to Europe, Vaccaro said. Jeremy Tyler is taking it to the next level.

“I always wanted someone to do this,” Vaccaro said. “It’s amazing to me this kid from San Diego has the guts to do this, to take on all these establishment people like this.”

James Tyler said this isn’t about cashing in on his son. If he wanted to do that, he could’ve accepted under the table payments from agents or college coaches.

“Financially we don’t need anything from him. I can provide for him,” James said, before laughing. “And that’s saying something [because] he’s a seven-foot kid that eats a lot.

“If you know Jeremy, you know this kid is going to excel,” James said. “Why would we waste his time holding him back? Kobe [Bryant] was only 17 [when he went pro] and he blossomed. And LeBron [James] blossomed. [Dwight] Howard blossomed. Why not give my son that chance?”

Jeremy hopes others take a look at the European option and consider it. Why mindlessly follow a system designed to enrich and reward everyone but the player?

He said he didn’t set out to be a revolutionary. He is one anyway.

In the future the news of a kid forgoing his senior year of high school might not sound so shocking.

http://sports.yahoo.com/top/news;_ylt=AhYghxvXHIKlW8sRn3zEISg5nYcB?slug=dw-tyler042209&prov=yhoo&type=lgns

I'm guessing this isnt what the NBA had in mind when they changed the age limits, the age restrictions are dumb and need to be changed.

Kyle N.
04-23-2009, 12:37 AM
Ok here I'll fix the rule. Players must complete high in spring of their graduating year and complete two years of college before entering the draft.

theuuord
04-23-2009, 12:41 AM
maybe it's just me, but i don't see any problem with this...

abe_froman
04-23-2009, 12:46 AM
we can *****,but its been to successful for them to change it back

braveniler58
04-23-2009, 12:56 AM
maybe it's just me, but i don't see any problem with this...

I don't either.

The only bad thing is, he won't even have his high school degree. Guess that's what GEDs are for.

still a fan
04-23-2009, 10:28 AM
Stern just got slapped in the face; his ruling on being in college for one yr, or being 19 one yr removed just backfired.

Reading this and the way Europe pays, and just the chance for a 17 yr old or 18 yr old for that matter to go overseas and just play basketball is going to be to tempting for guy's to just say no too.

This will now increase the players in the draft in the future coming from a Euro team, and really get to see them play against Pro's, ala Rubio and Jennings, and Gallanari.

This is important because Jennings is projected early this year. So now there will be increased scouts in Europe, and change the college game drastically.

So this means that the Euro scouts are now watching our High School players taking advantage of Sterns ruling:

It's going to get very interesting how he and the NBA react to this-





Quote:
Reports: Tyler to skip senior year
ESPN.com news services
http://sports.espn.go.com/highschool...ory?id=4090570

Updated: April 23, 2009, 9:35 AM ET
Jeremy Tyler, a 6-foot-11 junior, has dropped out of San Diego High School and says he will skip his senior year to play professionally in Europe, The New York Times and Yahoo! Sports reported on Wednesday.

Tyler, 17, will become the first player born in the United States to leave high school early to play professional basketball overseas. He is expected to come back in two years, when he is eligible for the NBA draft.

Tyler had made a verbal commitment to Louisville. He has not signed with an agent or a professional team, but he probably will play in Spain, the Times reported, although clubs from other European leagues are showing interest.

"Nowadays people look to college for more off-the-court stuff versus being in the gym and getting better," Tyler told the Times. "If you're really focused on getting better, you go play pro somewhere. Pro guys will get you way better than playing against college guys."

Point guard Brandon Jennings, a Los Angeles native, graduated last year from Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Va.) and became the first high school grad to skip college and play pro ball in Europe. He is wrapping up his first season with Lottomatica Virtus Roma in Italy. Jennings is projected as a high pick in June's NBA draft.

lakers4sho
04-23-2009, 10:32 AM
dropping out of high school? That's taking it a bit too far IMO...

cubulls
04-23-2009, 10:34 AM
A few hundred thousand dollars to drop out of highschool sounds like a good deal to me.

lakers4sho
04-23-2009, 10:37 AM
He's still a junior meaning his game isn't as polished as well...and he looks to play with PROS?? I mean...can't he wait until he graduates first?

He's probably not gonna earn "a few hundred thousand dollars" at first anyways...

WSU Tony
04-23-2009, 10:38 AM
So your opting to allow 17-18 year old without a GED to get millions of dollars playing basketball and then you expect him to stay out of trouble?

Do you wonder why the NBA is known for bad behavior?
Why are like 1/3 retired basketball players going broke 5 years after retirement?

They need an education, that's the reason. Half of these players are so brain dead it is amazing.

Becks2307
04-23-2009, 10:42 AM
this kid made a great decision..why play vs Crappy HS seniors and NOT improve at all...and risk blowing your knee, then getting nothing. Even if he fails he'll have $$ and he can pay to go to school and get his degree in whatever he wants if he so desires. People act like, he was studying hard in school or like he was going to collge for 4 years, the term student athlete is a misnomer...

people like to talk about what a failure Kwame Brown was....i would love to be Kwame Brown..he has made over 40 mil in his nba career.

king4day
04-23-2009, 11:11 AM
High School should be a requirement no matter where you play in the world.
He's not gonna grow as a person let alone a player.

king4day
04-23-2009, 11:13 AM
http://www.prosportsdaily.com/forums/showthread.php?t=354961

gcoll
04-23-2009, 11:20 AM
Good for that kid.


High School should be a requirement no matter where you play in the world.
Why?

Tony_Starks
04-23-2009, 11:22 AM
I'm not mad at the young dude, get your money! Obviously he has game if he's even in a position to get a offer like that. Why should he go to college? So the University can make mad money off him for a couple of years while he eats ham sandwhiches? I think not!!


This is the mess you created Stern!

Faneik
04-23-2009, 11:23 AM
High School should be a requirement no matter where you play in the world.
He's not gonna grow as a person let alone a player.

Not all youth sports' structures are like in the US...

In Europe, we don't have school's teams, we have what we call "clubs".

Clubs have several teams: over 20, under 20, under 18, under 16, under 14, under 12, ... etc.

If a kid with 14, is able to compete with the pros, there's no restrictions why he shouldn't (ex: rubio). That's the kid, parents and club decision. The league can't interfere.

A few thing scouts love about rubio: his experience for such an young age...

That's why I don't agree you need HS to grow as a person.

IRUAM #21
04-23-2009, 11:24 AM
**** you Stern !

theuuord
04-23-2009, 12:11 PM
High School should be a requirement no matter where you play in the world.
He's not gonna grow as a person let alone a player.

lol, good luck implementing THAT.

ATX
04-23-2009, 01:03 PM
Good thread and a great topic for conversation. If kids start dropping out of high school to play overseas, this is a problem. What if the kid doesn't pan out? Sure he'll have one or two hundred thousand dollars, but my money says most 17/18/19 year olds would blow that rather quickly trying to live the lifestyles they see NBA players live. Then what to do? I'd have my doubts that these kids would return to school and earn a diploma.

Face it, most highschoolers (Aside from LBJ) just aren't ready for the NBA in terms of skill or size. These "Upside" players usually ride the bench for a few years. Some pay off, some are busts. I liked where Sterns' head was at when he implemented that rule. He was trying to help the overall game of the NBA. Making them not elible untill 19 gives team scouts a chance to see how they "Mature" on a higher level before investing lots of time and money in them. I'd love to see kids go to college and develope not only thier physiques but their games more. Besides college basketball is richer for this.

Maybe Stern foresaw our highschool players leaving for Europe and implemented the rule for further globalization of the NBA product, thus fattening NBA execs wallets...

colinskik
04-23-2009, 01:14 PM
I'm not mad at the young dude, get your money! Obviously he has game if he's even in a position to get a offer like that. Why should he go to college? So the University can make mad money off him for a couple of years while he eats ham sandwhiches? I think not!!


This is the mess you created Stern!
Hahaha ... so true, so true

what54!?
04-23-2009, 01:19 PM
well thats stupid. At least get a damn high school dipolma

mjt20mik
04-23-2009, 01:21 PM
I actually like Stern's idea of the one year in college rule. I think it's really good that he's making them stay an extra year, so these kids get some actual education, understand the responsibility of the NBA and realize how to manage their money, by living the college life. I think it weill help a lot of players when it comes to managing their money at the end of their careers.

luckynumber_752
04-23-2009, 01:49 PM
I don't think it was a smart move. What if it doesn't even work out overseas? He has no idea how good he's gonna b at this point. You can't base your game off of what u do against High School players. Take Travis Outlaw for example, when he first came into the league outa Mississippi, his game was not ready for the NBA at all. The only reason that he's amounted to the terrific 6th man that he is, is the fact that the Blazers management liked him and decided to spend a lot of time and $ working with him. It usually doesn't work out that smooth. It takes perfect circumstances to end up on top when u start out at the bottom.

madiaz3
04-23-2009, 02:31 PM
Jennings has already said he hasn't liked it overseas. They take forever to get him his checks and it wasn't anything like he had expected.

superkegger
04-23-2009, 02:37 PM
dropping out of high school? That's taking it a bit too far IMO...

Did you read the article? Kids projected as the number one pick in 2011 already.


He's still a junior meaning his game isn't as polished as well...and he looks to play with PROS?? I mean...can't he wait until he graduates first?

He's probably not gonna earn "a few hundred thousand dollars" at first anyways...

I suppose he could, but what's the point? He can easily get his GED overseas, and it's not like living abroad for a couple years won't be a great learning experience in and of itself.


well thats stupid. At least get a damn high school dipolma


I actually like Stern's idea of the one year in college rule. I think it's really good that he's making them stay an extra year, so these kids get some actual education, understand the responsibility of the NBA and realize how to manage their money, by living the college life. I think it weill help a lot of players when it comes to managing their money at the end of their careers.

The one and done rule doesn't accomplish any of that.


To be eligible for a season, a kid needs to earn just two Dís in the fall semester. He can fail, or not even show up for, every other class his freshman year and drop out immediately after the season.

Yeah, really giving them an education.

The one year wait until after your class graduates is stupid. When Ricky Rubio can go pro at 14 in europe, why shouldn't Jeremy Tyler get that same opportunity?

Yall act like a year of college education is so vastly important that it can't be replaced by any other learning experience. This kid is going to be living abroad and experiencing what its like to be an adult, treated like an adult, and live like one. How is that not a learning and growing experience.

Read the whole Dan Wetzel article (http://sports.yahoo.com/top/news;_ylt=AlcKRTS7pr.MLiRHTyrt4sU5nYcB?slug=dw-tyler042209&prov=yhoo&type=lgns)about it. I give Jeremy Tyler mad props for his decision.

bogdanrom
04-23-2009, 03:11 PM
Smart decision by him. If his parents teach him not to spend his money all crazy then it's a great deal. To all who think that he should finish high school, and go to college. Why? He's isn't going learn anything,do you realize that. He just shows up a couple of days, and during game days. That's it. Most athletes that good don't care about learning, they care about doing what the do best, what they like and getting paid while doing it. Anyway he is still going to get his GED overseas while getting paid. He's going to learn to play better against the pro's in Europe. I'll take a year experience in Europe over a year in college any day. Plus college exploit this players so much. They can make money of these kids but they aren't allowed to get anything back. They're not just students. They do something else extremely well and they should be repaid.

Lo Porto
04-23-2009, 03:31 PM
Unfortunately, most everything in life is based on money. Shouldn't we have seen this coming eventually?

The rule had good intentions, but it just doesn't work. Some of the best players in the game today were straight to pro players - LeBron, Kobe, Garnett, etc. Plus, I don't like what the rule has done to college basketball. Too many one- and-dones. It's almost like they are sandbagging. Derrick Rose should have been in the league already but instead, he goes to beat up on real scholar athletes while his education didn't mean crap. The level competition of the college game is out the window only so a guy puts in his mandatory one year. It's like me going and playing YMCA rec soccer for a year although I'm ready for college soccer.

Hoopsadvocate
04-23-2009, 03:42 PM
David Stern just ****ed the league imo. Many kids will be looking at how this pans out for the Jeremy and will i wouldnt be surprised if more kids end up doing it for the money.
The scary thing is i think this will have a negative effect on the league i dont think players will get better they will get worse. I mean Jennings was a projected top 3 pick before he went to Italy and now hes droped considerably. Still somewhere around top 10 but hes dropped no doubt. A lot of stupid kids looking to get rich early and dont know the value of a dollar will rush to euro leagues for a quick payoff and there future careers will be in trouble because of it and the talent of the future NBA will be worse. Some kids will be smart and go to college and then be succesful in the pros but some are like this kids situation is a bit overboard and lets face it some of these kids once they turn 16 can do w/e they want especially when they will probably make more than there parents do by going overseas to play.

Overall David Stern has kinda ********** the NBA.

abe_froman
04-23-2009, 03:56 PM
David Stern just ****ed the league imo. Many kids will be looking at how this pans out for the Jeremy and will i wouldnt be surprised if more kids end up doing it for the money.


just like all those kids who followed jennings huh ;)

NIUHuskies
04-23-2009, 04:11 PM
I mean Jennings was a projected top 3 pick before he went to Italy and now hes droped considerably. Still somewhere around top 10 but hes dropped no doubt.

Him dropping out of the top 3 has nothing to do with him going to europe. It has to do with his performance. Wasn't BJ Mullens one of the top prospects coming out of high school and projected to be picked in the top 5? He had a less then stellar year at OSU and now may fall out of the lottery. There are tons of examples of players not living up to the hype they have coming out of high school. You make it sound like it's Europe's fault.

superkegger
04-23-2009, 04:17 PM
David Stern just ****ed the league imo. Many kids will be looking at how this pans out for the Jeremy and will i wouldnt be surprised if more kids end up doing it for the money.
The scary thing is i think this will have a negative effect on the league i dont think players will get better they will get worse. I mean Jennings was a projected top 3 pick before he went to Italy and now hes droped considerably. Still somewhere around top 10 but hes dropped no doubt. A lot of stupid kids looking to get rich early and dont know the value of a dollar will rush to euro leagues for a quick payoff and there future careers will be in trouble because of it and the talent of the future NBA will be worse. Some kids will be smart and go to college and then be succesful in the pros but some are like this kids situation is a bit overboard and lets face it some of these kids once they turn 16 can do w/e they want especially when they will probably make more than there parents do by going overseas to play.

Overall David Stern has kinda ********** the NBA.

I think you're a bit off. Jennings didn't get worse. His stock may have dropped a bit, but he'll still go high, and he's a better player now for the experience he gained in Europe, and it will have paid off in the long run for him.

Euro leagues have produced a lot of talented NBA playes, and our HS kids going over there won't make them worse. I don't really understand where you get off syaing that. You don't get better playing against worse players, you get better by challenging yourself by playing against better players. That's what they'll be doing, and they'll be improving their games.

Jennings and now Jeremy Tyler aren't doing this from a financial standpoint. They're doing it from a basketball stand point. It's not like Euro leagues are all of the sudden just start signing any 16 year old kid from the US cause he wants to play over there. They want talented players, and unless agents start really selling these kids on playing in europe, the high level teams aren't going to be trying to get young raw and untalented kids trying to get rich. Maybe some of the lower level teams will, but they can't offer the same money.

While I agree that the age limit is a bad rule, it hasn't ****ed the league. They're still getting all the top talent in the world coming here, and wanting to come here.

FOBolous
04-23-2009, 04:21 PM
I don't understand why these kids abhor the idea of going to college so much? what's wrong with that? everyday, millions of kids accross the globe dream of going to college and make something of themselves. everyday, countless families across the nation struggle to make enough money so their kids can go to college. and here's they're chance to get a free ride through college due to their god given talent and they're turning it down. dumb move.

yes true you can make millions right away and get filthy rich. but what happens if you game doesn't translate to the NBA and you end up on the bench. what happens if you're not good enough to have a lasting career? what happen if your career end prematurely due to injury? what are you going to do after you retire at 40? those millions you make during your career is not going to last you for the rest of your life. this is where college comes into play. going to college and getting a degree gives you something to fall back in. it gives you something to do after you retire from basketball so you won't end up being one of those 60% of NBA players who go broke after they retire.

These kids are stupid for not taking advantage of the free ride through college they're being offered. The parents are setting a bad example for not forcing their kids through college.

superkegger
04-23-2009, 04:26 PM
I don't understand why these kids abhor the idea of going to college so much? what's wrong with that? everyday, millions of kids accross the globe dream of going to college and make something of themselves. everyday, countless families across the nation struggle to make enough money so their kids can go to college. and here's they're chance to get a free ride through college due to their god given talent and they're turning it down. dumb move.

yes true you can make millions right away and get filthy rich. but what happens if you game doesn't translate to the NBA and you end up on the bench. what happens if you're not good enough to have a lasting career? what happen if your career end prematurely due to injury? what are you going to do after you retire at 40? those millions you make during your career is not going to last you for the rest of your life. this is where college comes into play. going to college and getting a degree gives you something to fall back in. it gives you something to do after you retire from basketball so you won't end up being one of those 60% of NBA players who go broke after they retire.

These kids are stupid for not taking advantage of the free ride through college they're being offered. The parents are setting a bad example for not forcing their kids through college.

Why can't they go back to college after they're done playing basketball?

There are plenty of people that are college educated that come into big time money that don't know how to handle it, and end up in bad situation. I just don't buy that if all of these kids went to college for 4 years it would solve the problem.

And there's nothing wrong with not going to college. There are plenty of successful people who don't go to college. College doesn't guarantee any kind of success, and forcing your kids through college is a terrible idea, when they have a god given ability that will only have a window of opportunity open for so long.

Chronz
04-23-2009, 04:34 PM
High School is such a waste of time anyways, you kids might not see it right now but when you go to college or something your gonna look back and realize you couldve skipped right through it with no consequence. Its once you out of highschool that schooling becomes important.

superkegger
04-23-2009, 04:37 PM
High School is such a waste of time anyways, you kids might not see it right now but when you go to college or something your gonna look back and realize you couldve skipped right through it with no consequence. Its once you out of highschool that schooling becomes important.

Pretty true, I coasted through 4 years of high school, especially my senior year. I'm not sure how much I really learned in class in high school.

theuuord
04-23-2009, 06:49 PM
Pretty true, I coasted through 4 years of high school, especially my senior year. I'm not sure how much I really learned in class in high school.

not to reiterate, but i had the exact same experience. i didn't do anything in high school. my second semester senior year i had two classes, and neither one was going to fail me.

high school is just what they do to keep you busy until you turn 18.

Jezeble
04-23-2009, 06:55 PM
High School should be a requirement no matter where you play in the world.
He's not gonna grow as a person let alone a player.

Someone should have told Tony Parker and other European players this. Parker has been playing professionally in Europe since he was 16. How's he doing now?:rolleyes:

MiamiHeat
04-23-2009, 07:00 PM
It's his own decision, and his father is supporting him
but I think he should talk to Brandon Jennings since he is being mistreated in Europe